Below you will find intelligence updates as our team of expert analysts continuously track the wildfires. These alerts provide a glimpse into one of 11 categories covered by WorldAware intelligence-driven risk management services.

Navigate to each of the wildfire alert updates below:

November 25: Update 13 | Warning Alert: Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, fully contained as of early Nov. 25. Ongoing evacuations to be lifted in coming days.

November 22: Update 12 | Warning Alert: Camp Fire approximately 85-percent contained as of late Nov. 21. Evacuation orders ongoing in parts of Butte County, Calif., US.

November 19: Update 11 | Critical Alert: Camp Fire approximately 66-percent contained as of Nov. 19. Evacuation orders maintained in parts of Butte County, Calif., US.

November 17: Update 10 | Critical Alert: Crews contain over half of the Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 17. Many evacuations and road closures maintained.

November 16: Update 9 | Critical Alert: Minor growth reported at Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 16. List of missing persons increases to over 600.

November 15: Update 8 | Critical Alert: Camp Fire continues to grow in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 15. Evacuations maintained; death toll increases to 56.

November 14: Update 7 | Critical Alert: Wildfire death toll rises to 48 in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 14. Containment slightly increases amid improved weather.

November 13: Update 6 | Critical Alert: Firefighters slightly increase containment of Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 13. Evacuations, road closures ongoing.

November 12: Update 5 | Critical Alert: Significant disruptions, structural damage, and casualties reported amid ongoing Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US.

November 11: Update 4 | Critical Alert: Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, Calif., US. Expect further evacuations and transport disruptions.

November 10: Update 3 | Critical Alert: Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, Calif., US. Expect further evacuations. Transport disruptions likely.


UPDATE 13: Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, fully contained as of early Nov. 25. Ongoing evacuations to be lifted in coming days.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary
 

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (CalFire) has announced that as of 0629 PST Nov. 25, the Camp Fire in Butte County, California, has been fully contained. Although flare-ups are not considered likely at this juncture, firefighters will remain on site to conduct mop-up operations and ensure that hot spots are fully extinguished over the coming days.

Camp Fire Overview
The Camp Fire has burned approximately 62,053 hectares (153,336 acres) of public and state land since it first ignited early Nov. 8. In addition to destroying thousands of residential homes and commercial structures, the blaze has killed at least 87 people and injured three others. Although most of the destruction occurred in the town of Paradise, communities in Butte Valley, Berry Creek, Brush Creek, Concow, Magalia, and Pulga were also severely impacted.

The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
As of early Nov. 25, localized evacuations remain in place in the following areas: Berry Creek Zone B, Cherokee Zone B, Concow Zone A, Concow Zone B, Concow Zone C, Lovelock Zone, Messilla Valley Zone B, Morgan Ridge Zone B, Nimshew Zone C, North Coutolenc Zone, North Fir Haven Zone, North Pines Zone, Old Magalia Zone, South Coutelenc Zone, South Fir Haven Zone (within fire perimeter), South Pines Zone, Stirling Zone, Yankee Hill, and Zones 1-14. Most of these evacuation orders will likely be lifted in the coming days, particularly as authorities no longer consider the Camp Fire a threat to infrastructure.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
Numerous road closures remain in effect due to ongoing evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-70, SR-162, and SR-191 are closed to traffic until further notice. The status of highways and secondary roads is likely to change alongside the needs of response operations; increased traffic congestion is expected after the remaining evacuation orders are lifted and residents return to their homes.

Residual disruptions to power and telecommunication services are anticipated across Butte County until fire-damaged networks have been repaired. Boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend and Meadowbrook mobile home parks, Gran Mutual Water, Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Charter School, Forest Knolls, Mountain Village, and Hartley water systems will likely remain in place until damaged water infrastructure is repaired and/or water quality improves.

Advice
Monitor local media for fire-related updates and advisories. Continue to heed all evacuation orders and boil water notices. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.


UPDATE 12: Camp Fire approximately 85-percent contained as of late Nov. 21. Evacuation orders ongoing in parts of Butte County, Calif., US.

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 22 Nov 2018 14:50 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California 
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Firefighters continue to battle the Camp Fire in Butte County, California, Nov. 22. Although favorable weather conditions have aided firefighting efforts over the past 24 hours, reports indicate that the blaze was only about 85-percent contained as of 1900 PST Nov. 21. Authorities maintain that the wildfire will likely be contained around Nov. 30; however, this date could fluctuate depending on local weather in the coming days.

The Camp Fire has burned approximately 62,053 hectares (153,336 acres) of public and state land since it first ignited early Nov. 8. In addition to destroying thousands of residential homes and commercial structures, the blaze has killed at least 83 people and inured three others to-date. Most of the destruction occurred in the town of Paradise. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area. Smoke haze, and the resultant poor air quality, continues to pose an indirect health threat to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in and around the broader Butte County.

Hazardous Conditions
The National Weather Service (NWS) has cautioned that a winter storm system could bring heavy rainfall, strong winds, and snow to parts of north-central California through Nov. 22. Although precipitation could help minimize ongoing fire activity in Butte County, sustained rainfall may also trigger minor ashflows near the Camp Fire burn area. High rainfall rates of more than 1.3 cm (0.5 inches) per hour could generate more disruptive mudslides near the burn scar with little warning. In addition to debris flows, flash floods pose a credible risk along burn scars across Butte County. Floodwaters and mudslides both have the potential to aggravate fire-related disruptions to essential services - including electricity, potable water, natural gas, and sewage - as well as transport operations in affected areas.

Evacuations
Although repopulation is slowly taking place in areas no longer under evacuation advisories, such as Campbell Hills and Durham, thousands of Butte County residents remain under evacuation warnings in the following zones:

  • Evacuation Zones (within fire perimeter): Concow A, B, and C; Lower Pentz; Morgan Ridge A and B; Nimshew C; Old Magalia; South Coutolenc; South Pines; Yankee Hill
  • Evacuation Zones (outside fire perimeter): Berry Creek B; Cherokee B; Lovelock; Messilla Valley B; North Coutolenc; North Fir Haven, North Pines; South Fir Haven

As of early Nov. 22, displaced residents are still being accepted at the Glenn County Fairgrounds in Orland, the Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridley, and the Neighborhood Church in Chico. However, emergency shelters continue to open and close depending on capacity.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
Numerous road closures remain in effect due to the evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-70, SR-162, and SR-191 are closed to traffic until further notice. Additional closures are also ongoing on secondary roads within the wildfire burn complex and evacuated communities. The status of highways and secondary roads is likely to change in the coming days due to fire activity and the needs of response operations. Low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across parts of northern California.

Fire damage has caused significant utility outages in Butte County. As of late Nov. 21, officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 5,325 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county are without service and will remain so until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure continues to be threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials are maintaining boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend and Meadowbrook mobile home parks, Gran Mutual Water, Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Charter School, Forest Knolls, Mountain Village, and Hartley water systems. The advisories are set to remain in effect until damaged water infrastructure is repaired and/or water quality improves within these areas of concern.


Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. Monitor local air quality index reports. People with certain underlying high-risk health conditions - such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or heart and lung disease - could have adverse reactions to poor air conditions in affected areas. People with such conditions should have adequate medication and consult with a physician. Concerned individuals should limit the amount of time spent outdoors during periods of poor air quality.

 


UPDATE 11: Camp Fire approximately 66-percent contained as of Nov. 19. Evacuation orders maintained in parts of Butte County, Calif., US.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California 
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Over 5,000 firefighters continue to battle the Camp Fire that has been burning in Butte County, California, since Nov. 8. As of Nov. 19, the wildfire has grown to approximately 61,107 hectares (151,000 acres) and was 66-percent contained. Firefighters still hope to have the wildfire fully contained by Nov. 30; however, the date could fluctuate depending on local weather conditions. A storm system is forecast to bring rainfall and high-elevation snow to parts of central and northern California starting Nov. 21.

The death toll associated with the Camp Fire continues to increase; as of Nov. 19, the fire has killed at least 77 people and injured three others. Teams are searching the towns of Paradise, Magalia, Concow, and the surrounding areas for missing individuals. Relatives and friends have reported over 1,000 people missing in the area. Many of the missing individuals are senior citizens who likely had difficulty evacuating. Several of the reports were issued while the fire was burning through the area; many of the missing likely escaped and do not realize officials are searching for them.

An estimated 12,462 residential and commercial structures have been destroyed by the fast-moving fire. Most of the destruction occurred in the town of Paradise. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
Thousands of residents of Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following areas:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley, Berry Creek, and Brush Creek
  • Evacuation Zones: Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Honey Run, Little Chico Creek (south), Lovelock, Lower Pentz, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill

Voluntary evacuations are ongoing in the Cherokee/North Table Mountain area, Messilla Valley, Lower Clark zone, Lower Neal zone, Hamlin Canyon, and the northern extent of the Little Chico Creek area. Residents within the voluntary evacuation zones are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Emergency shelters continue to open and close depending on capacity; as of Nov. 19, displaced residents are being accepted at the Glenn County Fairgrounds in Orland, the Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridley, and the Yuba-Sutter Fairgrounds in Yuba City.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of Nov. 19, numerous road closures remain in effect due to the evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-70, SR-162, and SR-191 are closed to traffic until further notice. Additional closures are also ongoing on secondary roads within the wildfire burn complex and evacuated communities. The status of highways and secondary roads is likely to change in the coming days due to fire activity and the needs of response operations. Low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across parts of northern California.

Fire damage has caused significant utility outages in Butte County. As of Nov. 19, officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 8,300 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county are without service and will remain so until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend and Meadowbrook mobile home parks, Gran Mutual Water, Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Charter School, Forest Knolls, Mountain Village, and Hartley water systems. Air quality in the Sacramento Valley and into the San Francisco area is classified as unhealthy in some areas. Poor air quality could pose an indirect health threat to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases.

Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. Monitor local air quality index reports. People with certain underlying high-risk health conditions - such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or heart and lung disease - could have adverse reactions to poor air conditions in affected areas. People with such conditions should have adequate medication and consult with a physician. Concerned individuals should limit the amount of time spent outdoors during periods of poor air quality.

 


UPDATE 10: Crews contain over half of the Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 17. Many evacuations and road closures maintained.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Firefighters are preparing for gusty winds and low humidity levels in parts of Butte County late Nov. 17-18, which could cause rapid fire growth near the Camp Fire complex. As of early Nov. 17, the fire had burned an estimated 59,894 hectares (148,000 acres) of land and was 55-percent contained. The National Weather Service has issued a red flag warning for the region from 2200 Nov. 17 to 1600 Nov. 18; wind gusts of up to 65 kph (40 mph) will likely complicate fire suppression efforts. Long-range forecast models continue to suggest that a storm system might deliver beneficial rainfall to parts of central and northern California starting Nov. 21.

The death toll associated with the Camp Fire continues to increase; as of Nov. 17, the fire has killed at least 71 people and injured three others. Relatives and friends have reported over 1,000 people missing in the area. Many of the missing individuals are senior citizens, who likely had difficulty evacuating. Several of the reports were also issued while the fire was burning through the town of Paradise, and many of the missing likely escaped the area and do not realize officials are searching for them.

An estimated 10,180 residential and commercial structures have been destroyed by the fast-moving fire, most of which occurred in the town of Paradise. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
Thousands of residents of Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following areas:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley, Berry Creek, and Brush Creek
  • Evacuation Zones: Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Honey Run, Hamlin Canyon, Little Chico Creek (south), Lovelock, Lower Clark, Lower Pentz, Mesilla Valley, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill

Repopulation of areas in parts of Forest Ranch, Durham, Humbug, Hamlin Canyon, and Campbell Hills are ongoing as of Nov. 17; residents of additional evacuation zones could be permitted entry in the coming days. An evacuation warning remains in effect in northern Little Chico Creek and North Table Mountain, where residents are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Although most evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, a center is still accepting displaced residents at the Glenn County Fairgrounds in Orland.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of Nov. 17, numerous road closures remain in effect due to the evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-70 and SR-162 are closed to traffic until further notice. While related ground transport disruptions will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across much of northern California. Air quality in the Sacramento Valley and into the San Francisco area is classified as unhealthy to hazardous in some areas. Poor air quality could pose an indirect health threat to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases.

Fire damage has caused significant utility outages in Butte County. As of Nov. 17, officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 16,000 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county remain without service until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend and Meadowbrook mobile home parks, Gran Mutual Water, Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Mutual Water, Forest Ranch Charter School, Forest Knolls, Mountain Village, and Hartley water systems.

Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. Monitor local air quality index reports. People with certain underlying high-risk health conditions - such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or heart and lung disease - could have adverse reactions to poor air conditions in affected areas. People with such conditions should have adequate medication and consult with a physician. Concerned individuals should limit the amount of time spent outdoors during periods of poor air quality.

 


UPDATE 9: Minor growth reported at Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 16. List of missing persons increases to over 600.

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 16 Nov 2018 19:32 GMT and is scheduled to expire 19 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Although the Camp Fire remained active overnight Nov. 15-16, officials observed only minor additional growth. As of Nov. 16, the wildfire has burned approximately 57,465 hectares (142,000 acres) of land and is 45-percent contained. Firefighters plan to continue strengthening and improving fire containment lines over the coming days, and the fire will probably become better controlled amid low wind speeds. Long-range forecast models suggest that a storm system could deliver beneficial rainfall to parts of central and northern California by Nov. 21.

The death toll associated with the Camp Fire continues to increase; as of Nov. 16, the fire has killed at least 63 people and injured three others. Relatives and friends have reported 631 people missing in the area. Many of the missing individuals are senior citizens, who likely had difficulty evacuating. Several of the reports were also issued while the fire was burning through the town of Paradise, and many of the missing likely escaped the area and do not realize officials are searching for them.

An estimated 10,180 residential and commercial structures have been destroyed by the fast-moving fire, most of which occurred in the town of Paradise. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
Thousands of residents of Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following areas:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley, Berry Creek, and Brush Creek
  • Evacuation Zones: Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Cherokee, Honey Run, Hamlin Canyon, Little Chico Creek (south), Lovelock, Lower Clark, Lower Pentz, Mesilla Valley, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill

Repopulation of areas in Forest Ranch, Durham, and Campbell Hills is ongoing as of Nov. 16; residents of additional evacuation zones could be permitted entry in the coming days. An evacuation warning is in effect in northern Little Chico Creek, where residents are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Although some evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, emergency shelters remain open at the Bidwell Junior High School in Chico.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of Nov. 16, numerous road closures remain in effect due to localized evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-70 and SR-162 are closed to traffic until further notice. While related ground transport disruptions will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across much of northern California. Air quality in the Sacramento Valley and into the San Francisco area is classified as unhealthy to hazardous in some areas.

Fire damage has caused extensive utility outages in Butte County. As of Nov. 16, officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 23,000 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county remain without service until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend Mobile Home Park, Gran Mutual Water Company, and Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water systems. Poor air quality could also pose an indirect health threat to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in the surrounding area.


Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. Monitor local air quality index reports. People with certain underlying high-risk health conditions - such as asthma, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or heart and lung disease - could have adverse reactions to poor air conditions in affected areas. People with such conditions should have adequate medication and consult with a physician. Concerned individuals should limit the amount of time spent outdoors during periods of poor air quality.

 


UPDATE 8: Camp Fire continues to grow in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 15. Evacuations maintained; death toll increases to 56.

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 15 Nov 2018 20:30 GMT and is scheduled to expire 19 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California 
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click above image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Officials continue to increase wildfire-related death toll and structural loss figures in Butte County, California. As of Nov. 15, the Camp Fire has burned roughly 56,656 hectares (140,000 acres) of land; despite the increased size of the fire, crews have managed to increase containment of the blaze to 40 percent. The most active fire growth continues to occur in more remote areas along the northern and eastern fire perimeter, as well as in the Butte Valley and Berry Creek areas. Authorities still hope to have the blaze fully contained by Nov. 30, but this date could fluctuate depending on local weather conditions.

As of Nov. 15, the death toll associated with the Camp Fire has increased to 56; at least three firefighters have also been injured by the blaze. Relatives and friends have reported over 300 people missing in the area. Many of the missing individuals are senior citizens, who likely had difficulty evacuating. Most of the deaths occurred in the town of Paradise, which was largely destroyed by the blaze.

Over 9,000 residential and commercial structures have been destroyed by the fast-moving fire. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
Thousands of residents of Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following areas:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley, Berry Creek, and Brush Creek
  • Evacuation Zones: Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Cherokee, Honey Run, Hamlin Canyon, Humbug, Little Chico Creek, Lovelock, Lower Clark, Lower Pentz, Messilla Valley, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill

It remains unclear when repopulation will be permitted within Paradise and nearby communities where fire activity has decreased. An evacuation warning remains in effect along Nopel Road from SR-32 north to the county line. Residents in this area are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Although some evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, emergency shelters remain open at the Bidwell Junior High School in Chico.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of Nov. 15, numerous road closures remain in effect due to localized evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-32, SR-70, and SR-162 are closed to traffic until further notice. While related disruptions to ground transport will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across much of northern California.

Fire damage has caused extensive utility outages in Butte County. As of Nov. 15, officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 23,000 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county remain without service until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend Mobile Home Park, Gran Mutual Water Company, and Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water systems. Poor air quality could also pose an indirect health risk to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in the surrounding area.

Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

 


UPDATE 7: Wildfire death toll rises to 48 in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 14. Containment slightly increases amid improved weather.

 

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California 
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Improved weather conditions have allowed firefighters to strengthen containment lines around the Camp Fire in Butte County, California. As of Nov. 14, the fire has burned approximately 54,633 hectares (135,000 acres) and was 35-percent contained. The most active fire growth in recent days has been reported in more remote areas along the northern and eastern fire perimeter, as well as in the Butte Valley and Berry Creek areas.

Light winds are expected over the coming days in Northern California, which should help with wildfire containment efforts; however, no precipitation is forecast in the region through at least Nov. 20. Authorities hope to have the blaze fully contained by Nov. 30, but this date could fluctuate depending on local weather conditions.

On Nov. 12, President Donald J. Trump approved a major disaster declaration for California, which will allow for the allocation of federal funding and resources to assist with the wildfire response and recovery. As of Nov. 14, the death toll associated with the Camp Fire has increased to 48; at least three firefighters have also been injured by the blaze. Relatives and friends have reported over 100 people missing in the area. Many of the missing individuals are senior citizens, who likely had difficulty evacuating. Most of the deaths occurred in the town of Paradise, which was largely destroyed by the blaze.

Over 7,950 residential and commercial structures have been destroyed by the fast-moving fire. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history. Expect the figures to continue increasing over the coming days as emergency crews conduct search operations and damage assessments within the burned area.

Evacuations
As of Nov. 14, roughly 53,000 residents in Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following areas:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley, Berry Creek, and Brush Creek
  • Evacuations Zones: Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Cherokee, Honey Run, Hamlin Canyon, Humbug, Little Chico Creek, Lovelock, Lower Clark, Lower Pentz, Messilla Valley, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill

An evacuation warning is also in effect in the Forest Ranch area (Nopel Road at SR-32 north to the county line). Residents in this area are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Although some evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, emergency shelters remain open at the Bidwell Junior High School in Chico, Yuba-Sutter Fairground in Yuba City, Plumas County Fairgrounds in Quincy, and Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridley.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of Nov. 14, numerous road closures remain in effect due to localized evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-32, SR-70, and SR-162 are closed to traffic until further notice. While related disruptions to ground transport will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across the region.

Fire damage has caused extensive utility outages in Butte County. Officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 23,500 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county are without service until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend Mobile Home Park, Gran Mutual Water Company, and Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water systems. Poor air quality could also pose an indirect health risk to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in the surrounding area.

Advice

Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.
 


UPDATE 6: Firefighters slightly increase containment of Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 13. Evacuations, road closures ongoing.

 

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 13 Nov 2018 18:21 GMT and is scheduled to expire 16 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California (map)
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Over 5,000 firefighters and emergency personnel continue to respond to the Camp Fire in Butte County, California. As of early Nov. 13, the fire has burned approximately 50,585 hectares (125,000 acres) and was 30-percent contained. Crews plan to focus on providing structural protection and establishing control lines ahead of the fire perimeter. The most significant fire growth is expected to occur along the northern and eastern flanks of the wildfire complex. Despite a respite in wind speeds, steep terrain and dry weather will continue to complicate fire suppression efforts over the coming days. Authorities hope to have the blaze fully contained by Nov. 30; however, this date could fluctuate depending on local weather conditions.

On Nov. 12, President Donald J. Trump approved a major disaster declaration for California, which will allow for the allocation of federal funding and resources to assist with the wildfire response and recovery. As of Nov. 13, the death toll associated with the Camp Fire has increased to 42; at least three firefighters have also been injured by the blaze. Most of the deaths occurred in the town of Paradise, where over 6,800 residential and commercial structures were destroyed by the fast-moving fire. The casualties and number of lost buildings have made the Camp Fire the deadliest and most destructive wildfire in California history.

Evacuations
As of early Nov. 13, roughly 53,000 residents in Butte County remain under evacuation orders and evacuation warnings. Mandatory evacuations persist in the following communities/evacuation zones:

  • Communities: Paradise, Pulga, Magalia, Concow, Butte Valley
  • Evacuations Zones: Berry Creek, Butte Creek, Carnegie/Colter, Cherokee, Honey Run, Hamlin Canyon, Humbug, Little Chico Creek, Lovelock, Lower Clark, Lower Pentz, Messilla Valley, Morgan Ridge, Nimshew, North/South Coutolenc, North/South Firhaven, North/South Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and Yankee Hill zones

An evacuation warning is also in effect in the Forest Ranch area (Nopel Road at SR-32 north to the county line) and the area bounded by SR-162, SR-149, SR-99, and SR-70 (excluding Shippee Road). Residents in these areas are urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change.

Although some evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, emergency shelters remain open at the Bidwell Junior High School in Chico, Yuba-Sutter Fairground in Yuba City, Plumas County Fairgrounds in Quincy, and Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridley.

Transport and Utility Disruptions
As of early Nov. 13, numerous road closures remain in effect due to localized evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. Sections of SR-32, SR-70, SR-149, and SR-162 are closed to traffic until further notice. While related disruptions to ground transport will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across the region.

Fire damage has caused extensive utility outages in Butte County. Officials from Pacific Gas and Electric (PG&E) have reported that approximately 25,000 electricity customers and 12,000 natural gas customers in the county are without service until conditions are safe enough to re-energize the area. Nearby telecommunications infrastructure is also being threatened by the Camp Fire.

Officials have issued boil water advisories for customers of the Paradise Irrigation District, Del Oro Water Company, Big Bend Mobile Home Park, Gran Mutual Water Company, and Blue Oak Terrace Mutual Water systems. Poor air quality could also pose an indirect health risk to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in the surrounding area.


 

Advice
Continue to heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

 


UPDATE 5: Significant disruptions, structural damage, and casualties reported amid ongoing Camp Fire in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 12.

 

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 12 Nov 2018 18:43 GMT and is scheduled to expire 12 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California (map)
  • Start Date: Nov. 8
  • Impact: Evacuations; property damage; disruptions to business, transport, and utility services

 

Summary

Click image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

Widespread disruptions, infrastructural damage, and evacuations continue to be reported amid an ongoing wildfire in Butte County, California, Nov. 12. The Camp Fire has burned approximately 45,729 hectares (113,000 acres) of private and public land since it first ignited early Nov. 8, leaving as many as 29 people dead and three others wounded. Although authorities hope to have the blaze fully contained by Nov. 30, dry vegetation, strong winds, and low humidity have exacerbated firefighting operations over the past 48 hours. Latest forecasts suggest that critical and extreme fire weather conditions will likely persist across California through at least Nov. 13, further aggravating efforts to bring the Camp Fire under control.

 

Evacuations
As of 0700 PST Nov. 12, authorities are maintaining mandatory evacuation orders in Butte Creek Canyon, Butte Valley, Concow, Magalia, Morgan Ridge, Paradise, Pulga, and Yankee Hill. Similar warnings are also in place in the Carnegie/Colter, Humbug, Lovelock, lower Pentz, Nimshew, north and south Coutelenc, north and south Firhaven, north and south Pines, Old Magalia, Powellton, Stirling, and lower Clark zones.

Residents in areas near the mandatory evacuation zones are also being urged to prepare to leave quickly if fire conditions change. Related evacuation warnings have been issued in the following areas:

  • Highway 162 to Highway 99 to Highway 149 to 70 (excluding Shippee Road from Highway 149 to Highway 99)
  • Nopel Road at Highway 32 (north to the county line)
  • Highway 99 east to Highway 70 (from Highway 162 north to Highway 149)

Although some evacuation centers have already reached full capacity, emergency shelters remain open at the Bidwell Junior High School in Chico, Yuba-Sutter Fairground in Yuba City, Plumas County Fairgrounds in Quincy, Glenn County Fairgrounds in Orland, and Butte County Fairgrounds in Gridely.

T

ransport and Utility Disruptions
As of early Nov. 12, numerous road closures remain in effect due to localized evacuation orders, response operations, reduced visibility, and firefighting activities. While related disruptions to ground transport will likely persist in the coming days, low visibility from smoke could also trigger flight disruptions across the region. Fire damage could trigger widespread utility and communications disruptions in affected areas; latest reports indicate that over 30,000 people are currently without power across California. Hazy skies and smokey conditions could also pose an indirect health risk to persons with preexisting cardiovascular or pulmonary diseases in the broader Butte County.


 

Advice
Heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.


UPDATE 4: Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 11. Expect further evacuations and transport disruptions.

 

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 11 Nov 2018 21:21 GMT and is scheduled to expire 12 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California (map)
  • Time Frame: Nov. 8-11
  • Impact: Evacuations, ground transport disruptions, power outages, property damage

 

Summary

Click image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

The Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, California, Nov. 11. As of 1100 PST, the fire is 44,110 hectares (109,000 acres) in size and is 25-percent contained. The National Weather Service maintains a red flag warning (conditions ideal for fires) for much of north and central California, including Butte Country, through the morning of Nov. 12. Full containment is expected to take place until Nov. 30.

The authorities maintain mandatory evacuation orders for several communities listed below:

  • Butte Creek Canyon
  • Butte Valley
  • Chico city limits (Skyway from Lower Paradise)
  • Concow
  • Magalia
  • Paradise

The following zones are also under evacuation orders: Powelton, Lovelock, Humbug, Stirling, North and South Coutelenc, North and South Fir Haven, Nimshaw, Carnegie/Colter, North and South Pines, Old Magalia, Lower Pentz, Morgan Ridge, and Lower Clark. Additionally, evacuation warnings are in effect for the following areas:

  • Highway 162 to Highway 99, to Highway 149 to Highway 70, with the exception of Shippee Road between Highway 149 and Highway 99;
  • Nopel Road at Highway 32, northward to the county line;
  • Highway 99 east to Highway 70 from Highway 162 north to Highway 149.

The fire has left 23 people dead and destroyed 6,453 residential and 260 commercial properties. The worst-affected area is the town of Paradise. The exact number of losses will be unknown until authorities can conduct a full damage assessment in the coming days. Power outages have been widely reported in the county and are likely to persist in the coming days.

 

Transport
The wildfires have prompted transport disruptions as of early Nov. 11. Road closures have been widely reported and are likely ongoing within the wildfire perimeter and evacuated communities. Anticipate congestion on all roads in the area as residents heed evacuation orders, and emergency response crews travel to and from impacted areas. Low visibility from smoke and possible ashfall could contribute to traffic delays and congestion in the region.


 

Advice
Heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.


UPDATE 3: Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, Calif., US, Nov. 10. Expect further evacuations. Transport disruptions likely.

 

This alert affects Chico, California

This alert began 10 Nov 2018 15:45 GMT and is scheduled to expire 12 Nov 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Wildfire (Camp Fire)
  • Location: Butte County, California (map)
  • Time Frame: Nov. 8-10
  • Impact: Evacuations, ground transport disruptions, power outages, property damage

 

Summary

Click image for interactive Google Map of California wildfires.

The Camp Fire continues to burn in Butte County, California, Nov. 10. As of 0700 PST, the fire is 40,469 hectares (100,000 acres) in size and is 20-percent contained. The National Weather Service maintains a red flag warning (conditions ideal for fires) for much of north and central California, including Butte Country, through the morning of Nov. 12. The flames are forecast to be fanned by northeasterly winds of 32-48 kph (20-30 mph) with gusts of 48-81 kph (30-50 mph).

The California Department of Forestry and Fire Protection (Cal Fire) has indicated that strong northeasterly winds are expected the evening of Nov. 10. In the northwest, Stirling City remains under threat. In the southwest, the fire is holding near Chico and the intersection of highways 99 and 149. Orville city remains under threat late Nov. 10 and 11 as forecasted northeasterly winds may drive the fires southward.

The authorities maintain mandatory evacuation orders for several communities listed below.

  • Battle Creek Canyon
  • Butte Valley
  • Chico city: East of Bruce Road between Highway 32 to East 20th Street and Canyon Oaks Subdivision
  • Concow
  • Magalia
  • Paradise

The fire has left nine people dead and destroyed 6,453 residential and 260 commercial properties. The worst-affected area is the town of Paradise. The exact number of losses will be unknown until authorities can conduct a full damage assessment in the coming days. Power outages have been widely reported in the county and are likely to persist in the coming days.

 

Transport
The wildfires have prompted transport disruptions as of early Nov. 10. Road closures have been widely reported and are likely ongoing within the wildfire perimeter and evacuated communities. Anticipate congestion on all roads in the area as residents heed evacuation orders, and emergency response crews travel to and from impacted areas. Low visibility from smoke and possible ashfall could contribute to traffic delays and congestion in the region.


 

Advice
Heed all evacuation orders. Seek updated information on road conditions if operating near the affected area; allow additional time to reach destinations due to road closures and congestion. Individuals not under evacuation warnings should consider remaining inside well-ventilated, air-conditioned spaces to reduce exposure to smoke. If located in a voluntary evacuation area, collect essential items - including identification and any important legal and travel documents - in a "go-bag" that can be easily accessed if authorities issue mandatory orders. Charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged power outages.

 

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