Preview WorldAware's intelligence-driven risk management solutions with our in-depth analysis of the Hurricane Florence.

Hurricane Florence Updates

Aftermath Update 1: 9/20/18: Some evacuations lifted in North Carolina, US, Sept. 19. Prolonged flooding and ground transport disruptions likely into October.
Update 15: 9/17/18: Remnants of Florence to bring heavy rain to parts of the northeastern US, through Sept. 18. Plan for ground and air transport disruptions.
Update 14: 9/16/18: TD Florence weakens Sept. 16. Coastal watches and warnings discontinued. Catastrophic flooding to continue in the Carolinas, US.
Update 13: 9/15/18: Hazardous conditions and disruptions persist Sept. 15 in southeast US due to Tropical Storm Florence.
Update 12: 9/14/18: Hazardous conditions and disruptions persist in southeast US as Florence is downgraded from hurricane to tropical storm Sept. 14.
Update 11: 9/14/18: Florence makes landfall near Wrightsville Beach, NC, US, Sept. 14. Expect hazardous weather conditions, related disruptions.
Update 10: 9/14/18: Florence's outer rain bands arrive in coastal North Carolina, US, Sept. 13. System to slowly make landfall by early Sept. 14.
Update 9: 9/13/18Florence maintains track in North Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 13. Expect dangerous weather as it draws closer to the southeastern US.
Update 8: 9/12/18: Florence to bring catastrophic flooding and destructive winds to the southeastern US, through Sept. 16, despite slight weakening.
Update 7: 9/12/18: Localized evacuations and weather warnings in place as Florence continues to advance towards southeastern US, Sept. 12.
Update 6: 9/11/18: Hurricane Florence forecast to make slow landfall near Wilmington, N.C., US, Sept. 14. Prolonged inland flooding event likely.
Update 5: 9/10/18: Florence strengthens to Category 4 hurricane Sept. 10. Evacuations ongoing in the Carolinas, US, ahead of forecasted landfall.
Update 4: 9/9/18: Hurricane Florence strengthens in the central Atlantic Ocean Sept. 9. Landfall chances increase in the Carolinas, US, Sept. 13-14.
Update 3: 9/8/18: TS Florence to become major hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean. Landfall possible in the southeastern US Sept. 13-14.
Update 2: 9/1/18: TS Florence moving away from Cape Verde, Sept. 1. Warnings discontinued; rain and wind likely to persist through the evening.
Update 1: 8/31/18:  Rainbands of tropical disturbance reach Cape Verde islands Aug. 31. Tropical storm likely to form in the coming days.


Aftermath Update 1: 
Some evacuations lifted in North Carolina, US, Sept. 19. Prolonged flooding and ground transport disruptions likely into October.

The locations affected by this alert are: Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina;  Wilmington, North Carolina; Morehead City, North Carolina;  Myrtle Beach, South Carolina;  Florence, South Carolina​​​​​​​; New Bern, North Carolina

  • Event: Florence aftermath
  • Location: North and South Carolina
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Road closures; business and transport disruptions; utility outages; evacuations

Click the image for an interactive map of the impacted areas. 

Summary
Recovery efforts are ongoing in parts of the Carolinas following the passage of Hurricane Florence. Many locations received over 0.6 meters (2 feet) of rain; the heaviest rainfall was recorded along the North Carolina-South Carolina border in an area roughly bounded by Myrtle Beach, Charlotte, Raleigh-Durham, and Morehead City. As of Sept. 19, the National Weather Service (NWS) maintains several flood warnings for watercourses in far northeastern South Carolina and central and southern North Carolina. Officials will likely extend the duration of the warnings over the coming days as the situation evolves.

Emergency Response
Disaster declarations have been issued to provide individual and public assistance with storm response and recovery efforts in Beaufort, Bladen, Brunswick, Carteret, Columbus, Craven, Cumberland, Duplin, Harnett, Jones, Lenoir, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, Pender, Robeson, Sampson, and Wayne counties in North Carolina. Similar declarations have been issued to assist residents in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, Horry, Marion, Orangeburg, and Williamsburg counties in South Carolina. Authorities expect to be granted additional emergency declarations in North Carolina in the coming days. Expect a significant local, state, and federal emergency response to the flooding situation over the coming days.

Due to the ongoing flooding in North Carolina, the following mandatory evacuations remain in effect until further notice:

  • Carteret and Onslow counties: Entire counties
  • Duplin County: Areas that received flooding during Hurricanes Floyd and Matthew; areas South of NC Hwy 24, between Interstate 40 and NC 111 Highway at Chinquapin. Communities include BF Grady, Chinquapin, Hallsville, Harrels, Kornegay, Mill Swamp, Northeast, Pin Hook, River Landing, Rockfish, Safe, and Sarecta
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

High water rescues could continue in areas along flooded watercourses and urban areas with poor drainage; authorities in North Carolina have conducted at least 2,600 high water rescues since the flooding began. Nightly curfews remain in effect for several counties in North Carolina; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest. Florence has been blamed for at least 37 deaths in North and South Carolina.

Hazardous Conditions
Anticipate long-duration flooding on area watercourses in North Carolina and South Carolina into early October. As of Sept. 19, 24 river gauges in the region were reporting major or moderate flooding; this number will fluctuate over the coming days as runoff drains toward the Atlantic Ocean. Watercourses that are currently flooding, or will soon flood, include the Neuse, Trent, Little, Rocky, Deep, Haw, Cape Fear, Lumber, Pee Dee, Little Pee Dee, and Waccamaw rivers. Water volumes will stress flood-control systems throughout the region, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days or weeks in some areas. As of the evening of Sept. 19, officials in North Carolina had made some significant progress, but were still reporting around 172,000 power outages. These numbers will continue to decrease in the coming days, but utility crews might be unable to access some areas that are cut off by flash and areal flooding until waters recede. Anticipate boil water advisories to be enforced in some communities where water treatment facilities might have been compromised.

Transport
Florence is causing extensive transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US. Floodwaters are inundating several roads, making driving nearly impossible in parts of the Carolinas; fast-moving water has washed away roads and bridges in the area, and overland transport disruptions will probably persist in the region for weeks. The following major interstates remain closed as of Sept. 19:

  • I-95: Several sections between I-40 and US 74 in North Carolina
  • I-40: Between Wilmington, North Carolina, and the I-95 junction near Benson, North Carolina

A lengthy detour to avoid the I-95 closures has been established along I-64, I-81, I-75, and I-16. While this route will cause significant delays for traffic and commercial trucking, it offers the lowest threat of encountering flood-related disruptions. Dozens of US and state highways, as well as rural and secondary roads in North and South Carolina, are closed indefinitely. Motorists in North Carolina are being urged to avoid driving on roads that are south of US 64 and east of I-73/74 until floodwaters have receded.

Maritime
Maritime transport along the southeastern coast of the US is normalizing following the passage of Florence. Port operations have restarted in South Carolina, but the Port of Wilmington and Morehead City remain closed to vessel operations as of Sept. 19. Officials hope to resume normal operations at both facilities by Sept. 21.

Rail
Hurricane Florence's passage has also disrupted rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US. Amtrak has canceled Auto Train (between Lorton, Virginia and Sanford, Florida) and Silver Meteor trains (between New York City and Miami) through Sept. 22. Modified schedules are also ongoing on various Carolinian trains (between New York City and Charlotte), Silver Star trains (between New York City and Miami), and Palmetto trains (between New York City and Savannah) over the coming days. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas into late September.

Advice
Heed all remaining coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cell phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas experiencing flooding, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred.

Resources
Weather
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov
NWS Water Levels: water.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 15:
Remnants of Florence to bring heavy rain to parts of the northeastern US, through Sept. 18. Plan for ground and air transport disruptions.

The locations affected by this alert are: Washington, DC; Boston, Massachusetts; Baltimore, Maryland; Hartford, Connecticut;  Providence, Rhode Island;  Albany, New York;  Manchester, New Hampshire; Harrisburg, Pennsylvania; Syracuse, New York; Groton, Connecticut; Binghamton, New York; Allentown, Pennsylvania; Scranton/Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania; New Haven, Connecticut; State College, Pennsylvania; Williamsport, Pennsylvania; Elmira, New York; Springfield, Massachusetts; Worcester, Massachusetts; Morgantown, West Virginia; Hagerstown, Maryland; Frederick, Maryland; Bridgeport, Connecticut; Stamford, Connecticut; Du Bois, Pennsylvania; Altoona, Pennsylvania; Johnstown, Pennsylvania; Hazelton, Pennsylvania; Ithaca, New York ; Newburgh, New York

  • Event: Florence remnants
  • Location: Northeastern US (map)
  • Time Frame: Through Sept. 18
  • Impact: Ground and air transport disruptions; possible flash flooding

Click the image for an interactive map of the impacted areas. 

Summary

The remnants of Florence are forecast to bring rounds of potentially heavy rainfall to parts of the northeast US through Sept. 18. The rain could quickly cause flash and urban flooding, particularly in areas where the ground is already saturated from previous storms. The National Weather Service (NWS) has issued several flash flood watches for counties in northern Virginia, Maryland, West Virginia, central Pennsylvania, Upstate New York, Massachusetts, Connecticut, and Rhode Island. Officials could upgrade the watches to warnings as the remnants move through the region. Widespread rainfall totals of 2.5-7.5 cm (1-3 inches) are likely; however, some localized accumulations of up to 15 cm (6 inches) cannot be ruled out.

Transport
Florence's remnants will probably cause some ground and air transport disruptions in the northeast US through at least Sept. 18. Disruptions could last longer in areas that experience flash flooding conditions. Traffic and commercial trucking delays are possible on regional highways, including along parts of the I-66, I-68, I-70, I-76, I-80, I-81, I-84, I-86, I-90, I-93, I-95, and I-99 corridors. Floodwaters could render some routes temporarily impassable, especially those located in low-lying areas with poor drainage. Although widespread flight disruptions are not anticipated, adverse weather conditions could cause some delays and cancellations at airports serving Albany (ALB), Baltimore (BWI), Boston (BOS), Harrisburg (MDT), and Washington, DC (IAD, DCA).

Advice
Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments where heavy rain or flash flooding is forecast. Plan accordingly for potential freight delivery delays if routing shipments by truck through the affected area Sept. 17-18. Avoid streams, creeks, and other watercourses that are prone to flash flooding. Do not attempt to drive through flooded areas. Confirm flights.

Resources
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov
NWS Water Levels: water.weather.gov
US Road Conditions: www.fhwa.dot.gov/trafficinfo


Update 14:
TD Florence weakens Sept. 16. Coastal watches and warnings discontinued. Catastrophic flooding to continue in the Carolinas, US.

The locations affected by this alert are: Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Columbia, South Carolina; Greensboro, North Carolina; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Charlottesville, Virginia; Florence, South Carolina; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Tropical Depression Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 70 km (45 miles) west of Columbia, South Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 30 kts (55 kph, 35 mph)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southwestern Virginia

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings.

Summary

Florence weakened to a tropical depression over South Carolina the morning of Sept. 16. As of 1100 EDT, the system's center of circulation was approximately 70 km (45 miles) west of Columbia. Forecast models indicate that Florence will likely dissipate into a remnant low-pressure system by Sept. 17 as it curves northeastward over the central Appalachian region.

Despite the lack of tropical storm-force winds, Florence remains a dangerous storm as it continues to produce record-setting rainfall in parts of the Carolinas. A prolonged period of catastrophic flash and areal flooding will likely continue for days after Florence exits the region. As of Sept. 16, all coastal watches and warnings associated with Florence have been discontinued; however, the National Weather Service (NWS) has issued several flash flood watches and warnings, as well as areal flood watches and warnings for northern South Carolina, much of North Carolina, and parts of southwestern Virginia. The NWS will continually update and could expand these weather alerts over the coming days as the flooding situation evolves.

Emergency Response
Following the landfall and subsequent weakening of Florence, officials in Virginia and South Carolina have discontinued mandatory evacuation orders for low-lying areas and coastal counties as of Sept. 16. Due to the ongoing flooding situation in North Carolina, the following mandatory evacuations remain in effect until further notice:

  • Carteret, Craven, Dare, Hyde, Onslow, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Cumberland: One mile on either side of Cape Fear and Little rivers
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Duplin County: Areas that received flooding during Hurricanes Floyd and Matthew. Areas South of NC Hwy 24, between Interstate 40 and NC 111 Highway at Chinquapin. Communities include BF Grady, Chinquapin, Hallsville, Harrels, Kornegay, Mill Swamp, Northeast, Pin Hook, River Landing, Rockfish, Safe, and Sarecta.
  • Harnett County: Areas near the Little River
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

Disaster declarations have been issued to provide individual and public assistance with storm response and recovery efforts in Beaufort, Brunswick, Carteret, Craven, New Hanover, Onslow, Pamlico, and Pender counties in North Carolina. Expect a significant local, state, and federal emergency response to the flooding situation over the coming days. High water rescues are likely in areas along flooded watercourses and in urban areas with poor drainage. Nightly curfews remain in effect for several counties in North Carolina; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest.

Hazardous Conditions
Although wind and storm surge threats have largely passed, Florence will continue to contribute to a historic flooding event over the coming days. Some areas have already received over 76 cm (30 inches) of rain in recent days. The remnants of Florence are forecast to produce the following additional rainfall amounts:

  • Southeastern North Carolina; far northeastern South Carolina: 7.5-15 cm (3-6 inches); isolated maximum of 20 cm (8 inches); total storm accumulations of 76-100 cm (30-40 inches). Catastrophic flash flooding and prolonged river flooding likely.
  • Central and western North Carolina; far northern South Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); total storm accumulations of 38-50 cm (15-20 inches). Dangerous flash flooding possible; elevated risk of landslides in elevated areas.
  • West-central Virginia: 5-10 cm (2-4 inches); isolated maximum of up to 15 cm (6 inches). Flash and areal flooding possible.

Anticipate long-duration flooding along watercourses in North Carolina and South Carolina. As of early Sept. 16, nine river gauges in the region were reporting major flooding, and seven others were indicating moderate flooding. These numbers will rise over the coming days as runoff from tributaries enters the Neuse, Trent, Little, Cape Fear, Lumber, Pee Dee, Little Pee Dee, and Waccamaw rivers. Many of these watercourses will probably experience moderate to major flooding into late September. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days or weeks in some areas. As of midday Sept. 16, officials in North Carolina are reporting over 700,000 power outages; over 50,000 residents in parts of South Carolina are also without electricity. These numbers will decrease in the coming days, but utility crews might be unable to access some areas that are cut off by flash and areal flooding until waters recede. Anticipate boil water advisories to be enforced in some communities where water treatment facilities might have been compromised.

Transport
Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US. Floodwaters are inundating several roads, making driving nearly impossible in parts of North Carolina; fast-moving water has washed away roads and bridges in the area, and overland transport disruptions will probably persist in the Carolinas for days. The following major interstates are closed as of Sept. 16:

  • I-95: Between MM 181-190 near Dillon, South Carolina; between NC-82 in Fayetteville, North Carolina, to Highway 64 in Nash County
  • I-40: Between Wilmington, North Carolina, and the I-95 junction near Benson, North Carolina

A lengthy detour to avoid the I-95 closures has been established along I-64, I-81, I-75, and I-16. While this route will cause significant delays for traffic and commercial trucking, it offers the lowest threat of encountering flood-related disruptions. Dozens of US and state highways, as well as rural and secondary roads in North and South Carolina are closed indefinitely. Motorists in North Carolina are being urged to avoid driving on roads that are south of US 64 and east of I-73/74 until floodwaters have receded.

Air
Following over 3,000 flight cancellations and numerous airport closures, air transportation is slowly starting to normalize across the Carolinas as of Sept. 16. Many airports that ceased operations during the height of the storm, including those serving Charleston (CHS), Myrtle Beach (MYR), Fayetteville (FAY), and Pitt-Greenville (PGV), have reopened. Despite this, the following airports in the hardest-hit areas of North Carolina remain closed:

  • Wilmington International Airport (ILM): Closed due to lack of power; scheduled to reopen to commercial flights by Sept. 18
  • Jacksonville Albert J. Ellis Airport (OAJ): Airport closed to commercial flights; emergency relief flights operational
  • New Bern Coastal Carolina Regional Airport (EWN): Scheduled to reopen Sept. 17

Several flights to the region Sept. 16 have already been canceled by various airlines; it could take several days for normal flight operations to resume in parts of the southeastern US, as flight backlogs are cleared, and aircraft and crew are repositioned.

Maritime
Maritime transport along the southeastern coast of the US is slowly starting to normalize following the passage of Florence. As of Sept. 16, vessel operations have resumed at the Port of Charleston and Inland Port Greer in South Carolina. Authorities are evaluating conditions at the Port of Wilmington and Morehead City, but no reopening announcements have been made as of midday Sept. 16.

Rail
Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US. Amtrak has canceled Carolinian trains (between New York City and Charlotte) and Piedmont trains (between Raleigh and Charlotte) through Sept. 17. Auto Train, Silver Meteor, and Crescent trains are also canceled through Sept. 18. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas into late September.

Advice
Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cell phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations. 

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 13: 
Hazardous conditions and disruptions persist Sept. 15 in southeast US due to Tropical Storm Florence.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Tropical Storm Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 76 km (47 miles) southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 39 kts (72 kph/45 mph)
  • Landfall (Date): Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County, North Carolina (morning Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southwestern Virginia; northeastern Georgia; eastern Kentucky; eastern Tennessee, and West Virginia 

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings.

Summary
Florence was officially downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm late Sept. 14 after the system weakened following interaction with land. As of 1100 EDT Sept. 15, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 76 km (47 miles) southwest of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The forward speed of the hurricane has decreased to approximately 3 kph (2 mph), and meteorologists expect Florence to remain over eastern and central South Carolina over the next 24 hours as it gradually moves northwestward.

Forecast models indicate that the system will continue to slowly weaken as it moves across South Caroline before transitioning into a tropical depression and turning northwards toward the central Appalachian Mountains around Sept. 16. However, significant changes to the forecast track and intensity cannot be discounted, particularly as the hurricane continues interacting with land.

Weather Warnings
As of 1100 EDT Sept. 15, the following coastal watches and warnings remained in effect:

  • Tropical Storm Warning: Edisto Beach South Carolina to Cape Hatteras North Carolina; Pamlico Sound, North Carolina
  • Storm Surge Warning: Myrtle Beach South Carolina to Salvo North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)

Emergency Preparations
Government officials in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland are maintaining state of emergency declarations in response to the hurricane; Washington, D.C. canceled their state of emergency Sept. 14. Some mandatory evacuation orders have been lifted, but many remain in effect for over a million residents:

South Carolina

  • Evacuation orders have been lifted in Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, and Dorchester, but remain in effect for Georgetown, and Horry counties

North Carolina

  • Ashe County: Voluntary evacuation for those in 100-year floodplain
  • Carteret, Craven, Dare, Hyde, Onslow, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Duplin County: Areas that received flooding during Hurricanes Floyd and Matthew. Areas South of NC Hwy 24, between Interstate 40 and NC 111 Highway at Chinquapin. Communities include BF Grady, Chinquapin, Hallsville, Harrels, Kornegay, Mill Swamp, Northeast, Pin Hook, River Landing, Rockfish, Safe, an Sarecta.
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

Virginia

  • Mandatory evacuations lifted for residents in Zone A of Hampton Roads, the Eastern Shore, Northern Neck, and Middle Peninsula as of 1100 EDT Sept. 15. Focus will shift to southwest Virginia flooding potential

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm. Officials in some counties have instituted curfews until further notice to keep individuals off of the streets; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest.

Hazardous Conditions
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southwest Virginia, and parts of northeastern Georgia through at least Sept. 17. Storm surge will continue along portions of the North Carolina coast as well as the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers in the Pamlico Sound into Sept. 15. Although the storm surge will lessen after that, Florence will cause extremely heavy rainfall in North Carolina and South Carolina that will likely lead to life-threatening flash flooding. Additionally, as the system moves toward the Appalachian Mountains, the rains will loosen soil, creating the potential for catastrophic landslides.

  • Southeastern coastal North Carolina; northeastern South Carolina: 50-64 cm (20-25 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • Remainder of South and North Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); localized totals of up to 38 cm (15 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly southwest Virginia. Onshore flow will cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation made landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • The Bay, Neuse, and Pamlico rivers: 2.4-3.7 meters (8-12 feet); locally higher surges possible
  • Cape Fear to Salvo: 0.9-1.5 meters (3-5 feet)
  • Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. As of 1100 EDT Sept. 15, tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 280 km (175 miles) from the center of the hurricane.

The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. As of midday Sept. 15, officials in the Carolinas have already reported approximately 800,000 power outages. Tornadoes and waterspouts are also possible.

Transport
Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking will be delayed and possibly halted along regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane continues to progress overland. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or in frequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence has prompted severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the southeastern US. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 16 and possibly longer. Airlines will likely cancel most flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are ongoing in the region as Florence continues to affect the coast. As of midday Sept. 15, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have maintained the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes

Rail
Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) through at least Sept. 16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will also not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 12: 
Hazardous conditions and disruptions persist in southeast US as Florence is downgraded from hurricane to tropical storm Sept. 14.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 25 km (15 miles) north-northeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 61 kts (110 kph / 70 mph)
  • Landfall (Date): Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County, North Carolina (morning Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southern Virginia; northeastern Georgia; eastern Kentucky; eastern Tennessee, and West Virginia 

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings.

Summary

Florence was officially downgraded from a hurricane to a tropical storm late Sept. 14 after the system weakened following interaction with land. As of 2000 EDT, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 25 km (15 miles) north-northeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. The forward speed of the hurricane has decreased to approximately 9 kph (3 mph), and meteorologists expect Florence to remain over eastern and central South Carolina over the next 24 hours as it gradually moves westward.

Forecast models indicate that the system will continue to slowly weaken as it moves across South Caroline before transitioning into a tropical depression and turning northwards toward the central Appalachian Mountains around Sept. 16. However, significant changes to the forecast track and intensity cannot be discounted, particularly as the hurricane continues interacting with land.

Weather Warnings
As of 2000 EDT Sept. 14, the following coastal watches and warnings remained in effect: 

  • Tropical Storm Warning: Edisto Beach South Carolina to Cape Hatteras North Carolina; Pamlico Sound, North Carolina
  • Storm Surge Warning: Myrtle Beach South Carolina to Salvo North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)

Emergency Preparations
Government officials in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, Maryland, and the District of Columbia are maintaining state of emergency declarations in response to the hurricane. More than 1.6 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina 

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, as well as Edisto Beach

North Carolina 

  • Carteret, Craven, Dare, Hyde, Onslow, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Duplin County: Areas that received flooding during Hurricanes Floyd and Matthew. Areas South of NC Hwy 24, between Interstate 40 and NC 111 Highway at Chinquapin. Communities include BF Grady, Chinquapin, Hallsville, Harrels, Kornegay, Mill Swamp, Northeast, Pin Hook, River Landing, Rockfish, Safe, an Sarecta.
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm. Officials in some counties have instituted curfews until further notice to keep individuals off of the streets; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest.

Hazardous Conditions
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and parts of northeastern Georgia through at least Sept. 17. Storm surge will continue along portions of the North Carolina coast as well as the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers in the Pamlico Sound into Sept. 15. Although the storm surge will lessen after that, Florence will cause extremely heavy rainfall in North Carolina and South Carolina that will likely lead to life-threatening flash flooding. Additionally, as the system moves toward the Appalachian Mountains, the rains will loosen soil, creating the potential for catastrophic landslides.

  • Southeastern coastal North Carolina; northeastern South Carolina: 50-64 cm (20-25 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • Remainder of South and North Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); localized totals of up to 38 cm (15 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia. Onshore flow will cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation made landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • The Bay, Neuse, and Pamlico rivers): 2.4-3.7 meters (8-12 feet); locally higher surges possible
  • Cape Fear to Salvo: 0.9-1.5 meters (3-5 feet)
  • Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. As of 2000 EDT Sept. 14, tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 280 km (175 miles) from the center of the hurricane.

The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. As of the late Sept. 14, officials in the Carolinas have already reported approximately 800,000 power outages. Tornadoes and waterspouts are also possible.

Transport 
Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking will be delayed and possibly halted along regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane continues to progress overland. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or in frequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air 
Florence has prompted severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the southeastern US. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. Airlines will likely cancel most flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are ongoing in the region as Florence continues to affect the coast. As of late Sept. 14, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have maintained the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes

Rail
Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) through at least Sept. 16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will also not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 11: 
Florence makes landfall near Wrightsville Beach, NC, US, Sept. 14. Expect hazardous weather conditions, related disruptions.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina;  Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia 

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 15 km (10 miles) south of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 80 kts (150 kph / 90 mph)
  • Landfall (Date): Wrightsville Beach, New Hanover County, North Carolina (morning Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southern Virginia; northeastern Georgia; eastern Kentucky; eastern Tennessee, and West Virginia 

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings. 

Summary
Hurricane Florence officially made landfall near Wrightsville Beach in North Carolina's New Hanover County, early Sept. 14. As of 0500 EDT, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 15 km (10 miles) south of Wilmington, North Carolina. Although the forward speed of the hurricane has increased slightly to approximately 9 kph (6 mph), meteorologists expect Florence to remain fairly close to the coast over the next 24 hours.

Forecast models indicate that the system will move slowly over southeastern North Carolina and eastern South Carolina Sept. 14-15, before turning northwards toward the central Appalachian Mountains around Sept. 16. Additional projections show that Florence will gradually weaken as it moves further inland in the coming days, potentially transitioning into a tropical depression by Sept. 17. However, significant changes to the forecast track and intensity cannot be discounted, particularly as the hurricane continues interacting with land.

Weather Warnings
As of 0500 EDT Sept. 14, the following coastal watches and warnings remained in effect: 

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Tropical Storm Warning: North of Duck, North Carolina, to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort; Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina 

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and parts of northeastern Georgia through at least Sept. 17. Significant storm surge has already been reported along parts of the North Carolina coast, with equally dangerous surge expected along the South Carolina coast in the coming hours. Maximum wind gusts of around 169 kph (105 mph) have also been recorded at Wilmington Airport, New Hanover County, since Florence came onshore.

Government officials in Georgia, South Carolina, North Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland are maintaining state of emergency declarations in response to the hurricane. More than 1.6 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach

North Carolina

  • Carteret, Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Onslow County: Topsail Beach
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Virginia • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm. Officials in some counties have instituted curfews until further notice to keep individuals off of the streets; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest. Hazardous Conditions Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and parts of northeastern Georgia through at least Sept. 17. Storm surge will continue along portions of the North Carolina coast as well as the Neuse and Pamlico Rivers in the Pamlico Sound into Sept. 15. Although the storm surge will lessen after that, Florence will cause extremely heavy rainfall in North Carolina and South Carolina that will likely lead to life-threatening flash flooding. Additionally, as the system moves toward the Appalachian Mountains, the rains will loosen soil, creating the potential for catastrophic landslides. • Southeastern coastal North Carolina; northeastern South Carolina: 50-64 cm (20-25 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely • Remainder of South and North Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); localized totals of up to 38 cm (15 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail. Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia. Onshore flow will cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation made landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide: • The Bay, Neuse, and Pamlico rivers): 2.4-3.7 meters (8-12 feet); locally higher surges possible • Cape Fear to Salvo: 0.9-1.5 meters (3-5 feet) • Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet) Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. As of 2000 EDT Sept. 14, tropical storm-force winds extend outward up to 280 km (175 miles) from the center of the hurricane. The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. As of the late Sept. 14, officials in the Carolinas have already reported approximately 800,000 power outages. Tornadoes and waterspouts are also possible. Transport Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking will be delayed and possibly halted along regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane continues to progress overland. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or in frequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation. Air Florence has prompted severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the southeastern US. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. Airlines will likely cancel most flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees. Maritime Temporary port closures are ongoing in the region as Florence continues to affect the coast. As of late Sept. 14, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have maintained the following status updates: • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15 • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17 • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes Rail Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) through at least Sept. 16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will also not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September. Advice Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events. Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations. Resources Weather National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov National Weather Service: www.weather.gov Emergency Management North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov South Carolina: www.scemd.org Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov Road Conditions North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov South Carolina: www.511sc.org Virginia: www.511virginia.org Airports Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com Maritime Ports North Carolina: ncports.com South Carolina: www.scspa.com Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com Utilities Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm. Officials in some counties have instituted curfews until further notice to keep individuals off of the streets; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will continue to deteriorate in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia overnight Sept. 14-15. A long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event is forecast to occur in the region through at least Sept. 17. The following rainfall accumulations are predicted in the affected area:

  • Southeastern coastal North Carolina; northeastern South Carolina: 50-76 cm (20-30 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • Remainder of South and North Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 15-30 cm (6-12 inches); localized totals of up to 38 cm (15 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely
  • Northeastern Georgia; central and northern Appalachians: 2.5-10 cm (1-4 inches); some flash and areal flooding possible

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia. Onshore flow will cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse, Pungo, Bay and Pamlico rivers): 2.1-3.4 meters (7-11 feet); locally higher surges possible
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to Cape Fear: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to Salvo, North Carolina: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Salvo, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm has significantly expanded and will encompass much of the region. As of 0500 EDT Sept. 14, hurricane-force winds produced by Florence currently extend outward approximately 130 km (80 miles) from the center of circulation; tropical storm-force winds currently extend outward up to 315 km (195 miles) from the center of the hurricane.

Wind gusts of over 160 kph (100 mph) are possible in coastal North and South Carolina over the coming hours. These winds could cause damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials.

The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. As of the early Sept. 14, officials in the Carolinas have already reported nearly 300,000 power outages. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore.

Transport
Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking will be delayed and possibly halted along regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or infrequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence has prompted severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the southeastern US. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. Airlines will likely cancel most flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are ongoing in the region as Florence makes landfall. As of late Sept. 13, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes

Rail
Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) through Sept. 16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will also not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 10: 
Florence's outer rain bands arrive in coastal North Carolina, US, Sept. 13. System to slowly make landfall by early Sept. 14.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Atlantic Ocean, approximately 160 km (100 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 85 kts (160 kph, 100 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Near Wilmington, North Carolina (morning Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southern Virginia; northeastern Georgia; southeastern Kentucky; eastern Tennessee and West Virginia

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings. 

Summary
Weather conditions continue to deteriorate in coastal North Carolina as the outer rain bands of Hurricane Florence push onshore the evening of Sept. 13. As of 1700 EDT, the center of the hurricane was approximately 160 km (100 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. The forward speed of the hurricane has significantly slowed to only about 8 kph (5 mph). Forecast models suggest that the center of circulation will gradually approach the Wilmington, North Carolina area overnight Sept. 13-14. By the morning of Sept. 14, Florence is expected to officially make landfall and slowly track westward into northern portions of South Carolina. Interaction with land will likely cause Florence to weaken to a tropical depression by early Sept. 16. The remnants of Florence are expected to turn to the north and northeast over parts of the central and northern Appalachians through Sept. 18.

Some fluctuations in the exact landfall location and time are possible over the coming hours as Florence starts to interact with coastal environmental conditions. Despite weakening below major hurricane status, the hazards posed by Florence are still significant and life-threatening. Regardless of where Florence's center makes landfall, the hurricane's large size and slow speed will cause extensive onshore flow, storm surge, heavy rainfall, and damaging winds in the Carolinas over the coming days. As of late Sept. 13, hurricane-force winds produced by Florence extend outward approximately 130 km (80 miles) from the center of circulation; tropical storm-force winds currently extend outward up to 315 km (195 miles) from the center of the hurricane.

Weather Warnings
As of 1700 EDT Sept. 13, the following coastal watches and warnings remain in effect:

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Tropical Storm Warning: North of Duck, North Carolina, to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort; Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina, to the North Carolina-Virginia border

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and into parts of northeastern Georgia through at least Sept. 17. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations ahead of the landfalling hurricane. More than 1.5 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach

North Carolina

  • Carteret, Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Onslow County: Topsail Beach
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)
  • Sampson County: Franklin Township (south of Highway 411 from Harrells to Clear Run)

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm. Officials in some counties have instituted curfews until further notice to keep individuals off of the streets; those found violating the orders could be subject to arrest.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will continue to deteriorate in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia overnight Sept. 13-14. A long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event is forecast to occur in the region through at least Sept. 17. The following rainfall accumulations are predicted in the affected area:

  • Southeastern coastal North Carolina; northeastern South Carolina: 50-76 cm (20-30 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • Remainder of South and North Carolina; southwestern Virginia: 15-30 cm (6-12 inches); localized totals of up to 38 cm (15 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely
  • Northeastern Georgia; central and northern Appalachians: 2.5-10 cm (1-4 inches); some flash and areal flooding possible

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly southern Virginia. Onshore flow will cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse, Pungo, Bay and Pamlico rivers): 2.1-3.4 meters (7-11 feet); locally higher surges possible
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to Cape Fear: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to Salvo, North Carolina: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Salvo, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm has significantly expanded and will encompass much of the region. Wind gusts of over 160 kph (100 mph) are possible in coastal North and South Carolina over the coming hours. These winds could cause damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. As of the evening of Sept. 13, officials in North Carolina have already reported nearly 70,000 power outages. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore. 

Transport
Florence is causing extensive ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking will be delayed and possibly halted along regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or infrequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence has prompted severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the southeastern US. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. Airlines will likely cancel most flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are ongoing in the region as Florence makes landfall. As of Sept. 13, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes

Rail
Hurricane Florence is also disrupting rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) from Sept. 13-16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 9:
Florence maintains track in North Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 13. Expect dangerous weather as it draws closer to the southeastern US.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Lexington, Kentucky; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: North Atlantic Ocean, approximately 325 km (205 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 95 kts (175 kph / 110 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Near the southern coast of North Carolina (Late Sept. 13- early Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southern Virginia; northeastern Georgia; southeastern Kentucky; eastern Tennessee and West Virginia

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings. 

Summary
Hurricane Florence continues to advance toward the southeastern US after transitioning into a Category-2 storm in the North Atlantic Ocean, early Sept. 13. As of 0500 EDT, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 325 km (205 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. Forecast models indicate Florence will weaken slightly over the coming hours, potentially making landfall as Category-1 hurricane near the southern coast of North Carolina, late Sept. 13-early Sept. 14.

Once Florence has arrived onshore, additional projections suggest that the system will slowly move westward across southern North Carolina and central South Carolina, Sept. 14-15. Florence is then expected to advance northwestward into eastern Georgia, Sept. 15-16, before turning north and heading toward Kentucky, Sept. 16-17. Meteorologists predict Florence will lose much of its intensity once it interacts with land - the system is ultimately forecast to weaken into a tropical depression over northwestern South Carolina or northeastern Georgia, around Sept. 16.

Significant changes to the forecast track and intensity remain possible amid ongoing uncertainties in the forecast. However, regardless of where Florence's center makes landfall, the hurricane's large size and slow speed will cause extensive onshore flow, storm surge, heavy rainfall, and damaging winds in most of the Carolinas in the coming hours. As of early Sept. 13, hurricane-force winds produced by Florence extend outward approximately 130 km (80 miles) from the center of circulation; tropical storm-force winds currently extend outward up to 315 km (195 miles) from the center of the hurricane.

Weather Warnings
As of 0500 EDT Sept. 13, the following coastal advisories, watches, and/or warnings remain in effect:

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Tropical Storm Warning: North of Duck, North Carolina, to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina, to the North Carolina-Virginia border

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and into parts of northeastern Georgia starting Sept. 13 and persisting through at least Sept. 17. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As of early Sept. 13, more than 1.5 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach
  • Mandatory evacuations lifted in Beaufort, Colleton, and Jasper counties (except Edisto Beach)

North Carolina

  • Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Carteret County: Atlantic Beach; Emerald Isle; Indian Beach; Pine Knoll Shores • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches • Onslow County: Unincorporated areas and Topsail Beach
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)

Virginia 

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm.

To facilitate the evacuations, authorities have implemented contraflow lane reversals along the I-26 and US 501 in South Carolina and are prepared to implement additional lane reversals along US 21 and US 278 if traffic conditions warrant. Regardless, extensive delays are likely on regional highways in the Carolinas and southern Virginia through at least Sept. 14 as residents heed the orders, including along I-26, I-40, and I-95. There have also been reports of long lines at gas stations throughout the Carolinas. Some distributors have run out of fuel due to the high demand; however, supply issues are not anticipated following the passage of the storm.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will likely start to deteriorate in the affected area throughout the day Sept. 13. Current forecast models indicate that Florence will significantly slow or stall off the coast of the Carolinas, bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event to the region through at least Sept. 17. The following rainfall accumulations are predicted in the affected area:

  •  Coastal North Carolina: 50-76 cm (20-30 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • South Carolina; western and northern North Carolina: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); localized totals of up to 50 cm (20 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely
  • Eastern Georgia; western and southern Virginia: 7.5-15 cm (3-6 inches); flash and areal flooding possible

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period. Flood-control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly into the Chesapeake Bay. If the storm stalls just off the coast as currently forecast, onshore flow could cause storm surge to persist over multiple high-tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers): 2.7-4 meters (9-13 feet)
  • North Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to North Myrtle Beach: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to Salvo, North Carolina: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Salvo, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm will be expansive and encompass much of the region. Winds associated with major hurricane can cause extensive damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris. Utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore.

Transport
Florence will lead to ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking delays are highly likely on regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or in frequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence will almost certainly cause severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the Carolinas, and possibly into Virginia and Georgia. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees. Delta Airlines (DL) has also implemented price caps on flights from cities in the storm's projected path. Airlines will likely cancel all flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are expected in the Carolinas and Virginia as Florence makes landfall. As of Sept. 12, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion, Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes; truck gates to reopen at all cargo terminals Sept. 13

Rail
Hurricane Florence will also disrupt rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) from Sept. 13-16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations. 

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov


Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com


Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com


Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 8: 
Florence to bring catastrophic flooding and destructive winds to the southeastern US, through Sept. 16, despite slight weakening.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Chattanooga, Tennessee; Columbia, South Carolina; Knoxville, Tennessee; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Atlantic Ocean, approximately 630 km (390 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 105 kts (190 kph, 120 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Near the North Carolina-South Carolina border (Sept. 14-15)
  • Affected Areas: North and South Carolina; southern Virginia; northern Georgia; eastern Tennessee and West Virginia (map)

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings. 

Summary
Hurricane Florence has weakened slightly in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 12. As of 1700 EDT, the hurricane's center of circulation was approximately 630 km (390 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. Despite decreasing in strength to a Category 3 storm, the size of the overall wind field has increased. Much of the weakening has been attributed to an influx of dry air into the system; only minor additional strengthening is predicted over the coming days as Florence tracks toward the Carolina coastline.

Meteorologists predict that Florence will approach the southern coast of North Carolina through the day Sept. 13, likely staying off the coast for an extended period of time. Weak steering currents could cause the center of the storm to slowly start tracking southwestward along the Carolina coast through Sept. 14 before the center of circulation finally pushes onshore near the North Carolina-South Carolina border at some point late Sept. 14 or Sept. 15.

Regardless of where the center makes landfall, the large size and slow speed of the hurricane will cause extensive onshore flow, storm surge, heavy rainfall, and damaging winds for at least 72 hours in most of the Carolinas. As of late Sept. 12, hurricane-force winds extend outward approximately 110 km (70 miles) from the center of circulation; tropical-storm force winds currently extend outward up to 315 km (195 miles) from the center of the hurricane. Florence is forecast to weaken upon interaction with land, ultimately transitioning to a tropical depression and remnant low by Sept. 17 in far western South Carolina and North Carolina. Anticipate additional changes to the forecasted landfall location and intensity of the hurricane in the coming days.

Weather Warnings
As of 1700 EDT Sept. 12, the following coastal advisories, watches, and/or warnings remain in effect:

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Tropical Storm Warning: North of Duck, North Carolina, to the North Carolina-Virginia Border
  • Tropical Storm Watch: North of the North Carolina-Virginia border to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, southern Virginia, and into parts of northeastern Georgia starting on Sept. 13 and persisting through at least Sept. 17. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As of late Sept. 12, more than 1.5 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach
  • Mandatory evacuations lifted in Beaufort, Colleton, and Jasper counties (with the exception of Edisto Beach)

North Carolina

  • Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: All unincorporated areas
  • Carteret County: Atlantic Beach; Emerald Isle; Indian Beach; Pine Knoll Shores
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • Jones County: All towns and unincorporated areas
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Onslow County: Unincorporated areas and Topsail Beach
  • Pender County: Topsail Beach; low-lying flood-prone areas and mobile homes (including areas near the Intercoastal Waterway, Northeast Cape Fear River, and Black River)

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest lying areas of Coastal Virgina and the Eastern Shore

Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm.

In order to facilitate the evacuations, authorities have implemented contraflow lane reversals along the I-26 and US 501 in South Carolina and are prepared to implement additional lane reversals along US 21 and US 278 if traffic conditions warrant. Regardless, extensive delays are likely on regional highways in the Carolinas and southern Virginia through at least Sept. 12 as residents heed the orders, including along I-26, I-40, and I-95. There have also been reports of long lines at gas stations throughout the Carolinas. Some distributors have also run out of fuel due to the high demand; however, supply issues are not anticipated following the passage of the storm.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will likely start to deteriorate in the affected area throughout the day Sept. 13. Current forecast models indicate that Florence will significantly slow or stall off the coast of the Carolinas, bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event to the region through at least Sept. 17. The following rainfall accumulations are predicted in the affected area:

  • Coastal North Carolina: 50-76 cm (20-30 inches); localized totals of up to 100 cm (40 inches) possible; catastrophic flash and areal flooding likely
  • South Carolina; western and northern North Carolina: 13-25 cm (5-10 inches); localized totals of up to 50 cm (20 inches) possible; significant flash and areal flooding likely
  • Eastern Georgia; western and southern Virginia: 7.5-15 cm (3-6 inches); flash and areal flooding possible

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period of time. Flood control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding are likely in the Carolinas and possibly into the Chesapeake Bay. If the storm stalls just off the coast as currently forecast, onshore flow could cause storm surge to persist over multiple high tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers): 2.7-4 meters (9-13 feet)
  • North Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to North Myrtle Beach: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to Salvo, North Carolina: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Salvo, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm will be expansive and encompass much of the region. Winds associated with major hurricane can cause extensive damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. The combination of highly saturated soils and strong winds will lead to fallen trees and power lines, as well as scatter debris; utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore.

Transport
Florence will lead to ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the southeastern US over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking delays are highly likely on regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or infrequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence will almost certainly cause severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the Carolinas, and possibly into Virginia and Georgia. Anticipate airport closures and major flight cancellations at airports serving the region through at least Sept. 15 and possibly longer. All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees. Delta Airlines (DL) has also implemented price caps on flights from cities in the storm's projected path. Airlines will likely cancel all flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are expected in the Carolinas and Virginia as Florence makes landfall. As of Sept. 12, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • South Carolina: Port of Charleston to close Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15; no train or gate operations at Dillion Sept. 13-16; Port of Georgetown closed until at least Sept. 17
  • Virginia: Manageable weather conditions expected for cargo operations; main shipping channel remains closed at the Virginia Capes; truck gates to reopen at all cargo terminals Sept. 13

Rail
Hurricane Florence will also disrupt rail traffic in portions of the southeastern US over the coming days. Amtrak has canceled all Piedmont trains (between Charlotte and Raleigh) and Carolinian trains (between Charlotte and New York City) from Sept. 13-16. Long distance trains - including the Silver Meteor, the Crescent, and the Silver Star - will not operate in the state until at least Sept. 16. Prolonged flooding could continue to disrupt some freight and commuter rail in the Carolinas through mid-September.

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov


Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org

Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 7: 
Localized evacuations and weather warnings in place as Florence continues to advance towards southeastern US, Sept. 12.

The locations affected by this alert are: Atlanta, Georgia; Washington, DC;  Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina;  Charlotte, North Carolina;  Norfolk, Virginia;  Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina;  Charleston, West Virginia;  Chattanooga, Tennessee;  Columbia, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia;  Huntsville, Alabama; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina;  Columbus, Georgia; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina;  Wilmington, North Carolina;  Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee;  Jackson, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia;  Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia;  Morehead City, North Carolina;  Cape Hatteras, North Carolina;  Nags Head, North Carolina;  Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia;  Albany, Georgia; Macon-Warner Robins, Georgia; Waycross, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina;  Beckley, West Virginia;  Parkersburg, West Virginia;  Clarksburg, West Virginia;  Morgantown, West Virginia; Valdosta, Georgia; New Bern, North Carolina;  Danville, Virginia 

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Atlantic Ocean, approximately 855 km (530 miles) southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 115 kts (213 kph / 132 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possibly near Myrtle Beach, South Carolina (Sept. 15)
  • Affected Areas: Alabama; Georgia; Kentucky; Maryland; North Carolina; South Carolina; Tennessee; Virginia; Washington DC; West Virginia 

Click the map for an interactive view of the storm path, as well as current watches and warnings. 

Summary 

Hurricane Florence has largely maintained its strength as it continues to advance west-northwestward in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 12. As of 0800 EDT, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 855 km (530 miles) southeast of Cape Fear, North Carolina. Forecast models indicate that Florence will approach the southeastern US as a dangerous Category 3 or 4 storm, eventually making landfall near Myrtle Beach (South Carolina) around Sept. 15.

Further projections suggest that the hurricane will significantly weaken upon interaction with land; however, the system could slowly track or stall in central South Carolina for several days. Meteorologists have indicated that Florence may transition into a tropical depression over northwestern South Carolina and possibly northeastern Georgia around Sept. 17. Precedent suggests that significant changes to Florence's track and intensity remain possible in the coming days.

Weather Warnings
As of 0500 EDT Sept. 12, the National Weather Service (NWS) is maintaining the following advisories, watches, and/or warnings:

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina
  • Tropical Storm Warning: North Of Duck, North Carolina, to the North Carolina/Virginia Border
  • Tropical Storm Watch: North of the North Carolina-Virginia border to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, Virginia, and possibly into parts of West Virginia and Maryland starting on Sept. 13 and persisting through at least Sept. 16. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As of early Sept. 12, more than 1 million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach
  • Mandatory evacuations lifted in Beaufort, Colleton, and Jasper counties (with the exception of Edisto Beach)

North Carolina

  • Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes; visitors in Holden Beach and Oak Island
  • Carteret County: Atlantic Beach; Emerald Isle; Indian Beach; Pine Knoll Shores
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Onslow County: Unincorporated areas and Topsail Beach

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Several voluntary evacuation orders have also been issued in surrounding areas of the Carolinas and Virginia. Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm.

In order to facilitate the evacuations, authorities have implemented contraflow lane reversals along the I-26 and US 501 in South Carolina and are prepared to implement additional lane reversals along US 21 and US 278 if traffic conditions warrant. Regardless, extensive delays are likely on regional highways in the Carolinas and southern Virginia through at least Sept. 12 as residents heed the orders, including along I-26, I-40, and I-95.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will likely start to deteriorate in the affected area throughout the day Sept. 13. Current forecast models indicate that Florence will significantly slow or stall over the region, bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event in the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic through at least Sept. 16. Preliminary forecast models - which are subject to change over the coming days - indicate that widespread rainfall totals of 15-25 cm (6-10 inches), with localized totals in excess of 76 cm (30 inches), are possible in parts of northeastern South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. The heaviest rainfall will likely occur along the coast of North Carolina.

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period of time. Flood control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail. Lesser accumulations of 5-15 cm (2-6 inches) are forecast in West Virginia, Maryland, Washington, DC; however, the ground is already saturated in these areas, and flooding will be a concern with the additional rainfall.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding is likely in the Carolinas and possibly into the Chesapeake Bay. If the storm stalls just inland, onshore flow could cause storm surge to persist over multiple high tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers): 2.7-4 meters (9-13 feet)
  • North Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to North Myrtle Beach: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to North Carolina-Virginia border: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm could be expansive and encompass much of the region. Winds associated with Category 3-4 storms can cause major damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. Since the ground is saturated in parts of the Mid-Atlantic, winds could easily uproot trees and scatter debris; utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore.

Transport
Florence will lead to ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking delays are highly likely on regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or in frequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence will almost certainly cause severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the Carolinas and Virginia. Most airports in the region have not announced specific closure plans, but airports in Wilmington (ILM), Jacksonville (OAJ), and Fayetteville (FAY) will likely close to all flights at some point before Sept. 14. Other airport closures in the region are likely but will depend on the storm's path. Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) and Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) are the largest airports close to the storm's projected path.

All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees. Delta Airlines (DL) has also implemented price caps on flights from cities in the storm's projected path. Airlines will likely cancel all flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are expected in the Carolinas and Virginia as Florence makes landfall. As of Sept. 11, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • Virginia: Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Inland Port, Virginia International Gateway, and Richmond marine terminals to close Sept. 12-13; decision on Sept. 14 operating status forthcoming
  • South Carolina: All ports in Charleston, Georgetown, Greer, and Dillon observing normal operations

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather

National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 6:
Hurricane Florence forecast to make slow landfall near Wilmington, N.C., US, Sept. 14. Prolonged inland flooding event likely.

The locations affected by this alert are: Washington, DC; Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina; Baltimore, Maryland; Charlotte, North Carolina; Norfolk, Virginia; Richmond, Virginia; Asheville, North Carolina; Charleston, South Carolina; Charleston, West Virginia; Columbia, South Carolina; Savannah, Georgia; Hampton-Newport News, Virginia; Greensboro, North Carolina; Greenville, South Carolina; Fayetteville, North Carolina; Jacksonville, North Carolina; Wilmington, North Carolina; Johnson City-Kingsport-Bristol, Tennessee; Lynchburg, Virginia; Roanoke, Virginia; Staunton, Virginia; Huntington, West Virginia; Annapolis, Maryland; Morehead City, North Carolina; Cape Hatteras, North Carolina; Nags Head, North Carolina; Myrtle Beach, South Carolina; Chincoteague, Virginia; Charlottesville, Virginia; Florence, South Carolina; Augusta, Georgia; Winston-Salem, North Carolina; Beckley, West Virginia; Parkersburg, West Virginia; Clarksburg, West Virginia; Morgantown, West Virginia; Hagerstown, Maryland; Frederick, Maryland; New Bern, North Carolina; Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 1,275 km (790 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 120 kts (225 kph, 140 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possibly near Wilmington, North Carolina (Sept. 14)
  • Affected Areas: North Carolina; South Carolina; Virginia; West Virginia; Maryland; Washington, DC

Click the map to view the projected storm path.

Summary
Hurricane Florence continues to track west-northwestward in the Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 11. As of 1700 AST, the system's center of circulation was approximately 1,275 km (790 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. Forecast models suggest that a new intensification phase is likely through Sept. 13, and Florence is expected to approach the southeastern US as a dangerous Category 3 or 4 storm. Although some uncertainty remains in the landfall location, current models indicate that the center of the storm could come onshore near Wilmington, North Carolina, during the day Sept. 14.

A lack of steering currents near the eastern seaboard will cause the hurricane's forward speed to slow considerably during landfall, and the system could slowly track or stall in central North Carolina for several days. Florence will weaken upon interaction with land; however, it could remain a tropical depression through Sept. 16.

The following coastal watches are in effect (1700 EDT Sept. 11):

  • Hurricane Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina, to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico sounds
  • Hurricane Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina, to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina, to the North Carolina-Virginia border
  • Tropical Storm Watch: North of the North Carolina-Virginia border to Cape Charles Light, Virginia; Chesapeake Bay south of New Point Comfort
  • Storm Surge Warning: South Santee River, South Carolina to Duck, North Carolina; Albemarle and Pamlico Sounds (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers)
  • Storm Surge Watch: Edisto Beach, South Carolina to South Santee River, South Carolina; North of Duck, North Carolina to the North Carolina-Virginia border

Emergency Preparations
Life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, Virginia, and possibly into parts of West Virginia and Maryland starting on Sept. 13 and persisting through at least Sept. 16. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As of Sept. 11, more than one million residents have been placed under mandatory evacuation orders in the following areas:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester, Georgetown, and Horry counties, including Edisto Beach
  • Mandatory evacuations lifted in Beaufort, Colleton, and Jasper counties as of Sept. 11

North Carolina

  • Craven, Dare, Hyde, Pamlico, and Tyrrell counties: Entire counties
  • Beaufort County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes
  • Brunswick County: Low-lying flood-prone areas and mobiles homes; visitors in Holden Beach and Oak Island
  • Carteret County: Atlantic Beach; Emerald Isle; Indian Beach; Pine Knoll Shores
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova)
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington; Carolina, Kure, and Wrightsville beaches
  • Onslow County: Unincorporated areas and Topsail Beach

Virginia

  • All residents in Zone A, the lowest-lying areas of Coastal Virginia and the Eastern Shore

Several voluntary evacuation orders have also been issued in surrounding areas of the Carolinas and Virginia. Authorities are warning that emergency services will likely be unavailable to individuals who fail to heed mandatory evacuation orders for the duration of the storm.

In order to facilitate the evacuations, authorities have implemented contraflow lane reversals along the I-26 and US 501 in South Carolina and are prepared to implement additional lane reversals along US 21 and US 278 if traffic conditions warrant. Regardless, extensive delays are likely on regional highways in the Carolinas and southern Virginia through at least Sept. 12 as residents heed the orders, including along I-26, I-40, and I-95.

Hazardous Conditions
Weather conditions will likely start to deteriorate in the affected area throughout the day Sept. 13. Current forecast models indicate that Florence will significantly slow or stall over the region, bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event in the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic through at least Sept. 16. Preliminary forecast models - which are subject to change over the coming days - indicate that widespread rainfall totals of 15-25 cm (6-10 inches), with localized totals in excess of 76 cm (30 inches), are possible in parts of northeastern South Carolina, North Carolina, and Virginia. The heaviest rainfall will likely occur along the coast of North Carolina.

This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period of time. Flood control systems throughout the region will be stressed by the water volumes, and some protection measures - such as dams and reservoirs - could fail. Lesser accumulations of 5-15 cm (2-6 inches) are forecast in West Virginia, Maryland, Washington, DC; however, the ground is already saturated in these areas, and flooding will be a concern with the additional rainfall.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding is likely in the Carolinas and possibly into the Chesapeake Bay. If the storm stalls just inland, onshore flow could cause storm surge to persist over multiple high tide cycles, since water will be unable to drain into the Atlantic Ocean. The most significant storm surge is likely to occur near and to the northeast of where the center of circulation makes landfall. The following water levels above normal tides are possible, especially if the surge coincides with high tide:

  • Cape Fear to Cape Lookout (including the Neuse and Pamlico rivers): 2.7-4 meters (9-13 feet)
  • North Myrtle Beach to Cape Fear: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • Cape Lookout to Ocracoke Inlet: 1.8-2.7 meters (6-9 feet)
  • South Santee River to North Myrtle Beach: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Ocracoke Inlet to North Carolina-Virginia border: 1.2-1.8 meters (4-6 feet)
  • Edisto Beach to South Santee River: 0.6-1.2 meters (2-4 feet)

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm could be expansive and encompass much of the region. Winds associated with Category 3-4 storms can cause major damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. Since the ground is saturated in parts of the Mid-Atlantic, winds could easily uproot trees and scatter debris; utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days to weeks in some areas. Tornadoes and waterspouts are likely as Florence's rain bands come onshore.

Transport
Florence will lead to ground, air, and maritime transport disruptions throughout the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic over the coming days. Traffic and commercial trucking delays are highly likely on regional highways; high winds will pose a significant hazard to vehicles, and travel bans could be instituted as the hurricane makes landfall. Secondary and low-lying roads will probably be inundated by floodwaters; authorities might close some roads and bridges to traffic, especially those along the coast or infrequently flooded locations of urban areas. Standing water could block some low-lying roads for several days following Florence's dissipation.

Air
Florence will almost certainly cause severe and widespread air travel disruptions in the Carolinas and Virginia. Most airports in the region have not announced specific closure plans, but airports in Wilmington (ILM), Jacksonville (OAJ), and Fayetteville (FAY) will likely close to all flights at some point before Sept. 14. Other airport closures in the region are likely but will depend on the storm's path. Raleigh-Durham International Airport (RDU) and Charlotte Douglas International Airport (CLT) are the largest airports close to the storm's projected path.

All major US carriers have issued travel waivers allowing passengers flying to, from, or through airports in the region to change or cancel tickets without additional fees. Delta Airlines (DL) has also implemented price caps on flights from cities in the storm's projected path. Airlines will likely cancel all flights to many airports in the region, even if the airports remain open.

Maritime
Temporary port closures are expected in the Carolinas and Virginia as Florence makes landfall. As of Sept. 11, port authorities and US Coast Guard officials have confirmed the following status updates:

  • North Carolina: Port of Wilmington and Port of Morehead City to close from 1200 Sept. 13 through at least Sept. 15
  • Virginia: Newport News, Norfolk, Portsmouth, Virginia Inland Port, Virginia International Gateway, and Richmond marine terminals to close Sept. 12-13; decision on Sept. 14 operating status forthcoming
  • South Carolina: All ports in Charleston, Georgetown, Greer, and Dillon observing normal operations

Advice
Activate contingency plans in areas where hurricane or tropical storm conditions are forecast. Heed all coastal evacuation orders. Use extreme caution in low-lying coastal areas, and near streams, creeks, and other waterways due to the high potential for severe flooding and storm surge. Stockpile water, batteries, and other essentials in advance. Charge battery-powered devices when electricity is available; restrict the use of cellular phones to emergencies only. Power down mobile devices when not in use. Keep important documents in waterproof containers. Observe strict food and water precautions after the storm passes, as municipalities could issue boil water advisories following flooding events.

Plan accordingly for protracted commercial, transport, and logistics disruptions in areas in the path of the storm, especially if vital infrastructure is damaged. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments through areas where flooding has occurred. Confirm flights before checking out of hotels or driving to the airport; clearing passenger backlogs may take several days in some locations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov

Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov

Road Conditions
North Carolina: www.ncdot.gov
South Carolina: www.511sc.org
Virginia: www.511virginia.org

Airports
Charlotte Douglas International Airport: www.cltairport.com
Myrtle Beach International Airport: www.flymyrtlebeach.com
Wilmington International Airport: www.flyilm.com
Raleigh-Durham International Airport: www.rdu.com
Norfolk International Airport: www.norfolkairport.com
Richmond International Airport: flyrichmond.com

Maritime Ports
North Carolina: ncports.com
South Carolina: www.scspa.com
Virginia: www.portofvirginia.com

Utilities
Duke Energy (Carolinas): www.outagemap.duke-energy.com
South Carolina Electric and Gas: www.sceg.com
Santee Cooper: www.stormcenter.santeecooper.com
Dominion Virginia Power: www.dom.com


Update 5: 
Florence strengthens to Category 4 hurricane Sept. 10. Evacuations ongoing in the Carolinas, US, ahead of forecasted landfall. 

The locations affected by this alert are: Washington, DC, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina,  Baltimore, Maryland, Charlotte, North Carolina, Norfolk, Virginia, Richmond, Virginia,  Asheville, North Carolina,  Charleston, South Carolina,  Charleston, West Virginia,  Columbia, South Carolina, Savannah, Georgia, Hampton-Newport News, Virginia,  Greensboro, North Carolina, Greenville, South Carolina, Fayetteville, North Carolina,  Jacksonville, North Carolina, Wilmington, North Carolina, Lynchburg, Virginia, Roanoke, Virginia, Staunton, Virginia, Huntington, West Virginia, Annapolis, Maryland, Morehead City, North Carolina, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Nags Head, North Carolina, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Chincoteague, Virginia, Charlottesville, Virginia, Florence, South Carolina, Augusta, Georgia, Winston-Salem, North Carolina, Beckley, West Virginia, Parkersburg, West Virginia, Clarksburg, West Virginia, Morgantown, West Virginia, Hagerstown, Maryland, Frederick, Maryland, New Bern, North Carolina, Danville, Virginia

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 1,900 km (1,180 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 120 kts (225 kph, 140 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possibly near Wilmington, North Carolina (late Sept. 13)
  • Affected Areas: North Carolina; South Carolina; Virginia; West Virginia; Maryland 

 

Click the map to view the projected storm path.

Summary
Hurricane Florence has undergone rapid intensification in the past 24 hours over the Atlantic Ocean. As of 1700 AST Sept. 10, the center of the Category 4 storm was approximately 1,900 km (1,180 miles) southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. Additional strengthening is possible in the coming days, and Florence could approach Category 5 status around Sept. 12. Current forecast models indicate that the hurricane will slightly weaken as it approaches the Carolina coastline due to increased wind shear; however, Florence will likely make landfall as a dangerous Category 4 storm with winds of up to 225 kph (140 mph) near the center of circulation.

Forecast models continue to come into better agreement that Florence will make landfall between South Carolina and the Virginia Tidewater late Sept. 13. As of Sept. 10, the most likely landfall location is near Wilmington, North Carolina. Anticipate considerable changes in Florence's track and intensity forecast over the coming days. There are currently no coastal watches or warnings in effect; however, officials from the National Hurricane Center (NHC) anticipate issuing storm surge and hurricane watches for parts of the eastern seaboard starting on Sept. 11.

If Florence makes landfall, life-threatening weather conditions are likely in the Carolinas, Virginia, and parts of West Virginia and Maryland. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, Virginia, and Maryland have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As of Sept. 10, the following mandatory evacuation orders have been issued:

South Carolina

  • All evacuation zones in Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Horry, and Jasper counties (effective 1200 EDT Sept. 11)

North Carolina

  • Brunswick County: Low-lying flood prone areas and mobiles homes (effective Sept. 11)
  • Currituck County: Currituck Outer Banks (Corolla and Carova) (effective 0700 EDT Sept. 11)
  • Dare County: Hatteras Island (effective 1200 EDT Sept. 10); entire county (effective 0700 EDT Sept. 11)
  • Hyde County: Ocracoke (visitors to leave starting Sept. 10; residents starting Sept. 11)
  • New Hanover County: University of North Carolina Wilmington (effective 0800 EDT Sept. 11)

As forecasts become more clear and coastal weather alerts are issued by the NHC, officials could issue additional mandatory evacuation orders in the affected area. In order to facilitate evacuation orders in South Carolina, contraflow lane reversals will be implemented starting at 1200 EDT Sept. 11 on sections of I-26 and US 501. Authorities are prepared to also implement additional lane reversals along US 21 and US 278 if traffic conditions warrant.

Hazardous Conditions
Ultimately, the potential impact to the region, including rainfall amounts, wind speeds, and storm surge levels remain uncertain at this time. There is the possibility for the system to significantly slow or stall over the region, potentially bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event in the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic through at least Sept. 16. Preliminary forecast models - which are subject to change over the coming days - indicate that widespread rainfall totals of 15-25 cm (6-10 inches), with localized totals in excess of 60 cm (24 inches), are possible in parts of North Carolina, Virginia, and eastern West Virginia. This amount of rainfall will undoubtedly cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding for a prolonged period of time. Several dams and reservoirs could become overwhelmed and subject to failure.

Extensive and historic storm surge inundation and coastal flooding is likely in the Carolinas and possibly into the Chesapeake Bay; if the storm stalls just inland, onshore flow could cause storm surge to persist over multiple high tide cycles. The extent and magnitude of storm surge levels will become clearer in the coming days.

Destructive winds will also be a concern throughout the affected area. Although the strongest hurricane-force winds will occur near the center of circulation, the wind field of the storm could be expansive and encompass much of the region. Winds associated with Category 4 storms can cause major damage to well-built homes, including the removal of roofing and decking materials. Since the ground is saturated in parts of the Mid-Atlantic, winds could easily uproot trees and scatter debris; utilities, including power and water, are unlikely to be available for several days in some areas.


As the system continues to track through the Atlantic Ocean in the coming days, forecast models will be able to better predict the magnitude of effects throughout the region. Nevertheless, anticipate and start to plan for extensive business and transport disruptions in the southeastern US starting late Sept. 12 and lasting through at least Sept. 16. Ground, air, rail, and maritime transport in the Carolinas and into the Mid-Atlantic could be impacted for several days. Many airlines are already offering travel waivers for itineraries within Florence's projected path.

Advice
Those with business interests or travel arrangements in the southeastern US Sept. 12-16 should closely monitor updated tropical forecasts over the coming days. Residents and visitors should heed all evacuation orders. Review and be prepared to implement business continuity measures in the event of a potential landfall. Stockpile emergency supplies, including bottled water, non-perishable food, batteries, and first aid supplies. Home and business owners near the potential landfall site should be prepared to secure properties with necessary mitigation materials (e.g. storm shutters) well before the storm comes onshore. Confirm all transport reservations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov


Emergency Management
North Carolina: www.ncdps.gov
South Carolina: www.scemd.org
Virginia: www.vaemergency.gov


Update 4:
Hurricane Florence strengthens in the central Atlantic Ocean Sept. 9. Landfall chances increase in the Carolinas, US, Sept. 13-14. 

Locations affected by this alert: Augusta, Georgia, Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, Fayetteville, North Carolina, Florence, South Carolina, Jacksonville, Florida, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Morehead City, North Carolina, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Nags Head, North Carolina, New Bern, North Carolina, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Savannah, Georgia, Waycross, Georgia, Wilmington, North Carolina

  • Event: Hurricane Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 2,310 km (1,435 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 75 kts (135 kph, 85 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possibly in North or South Carolina (Sept. 13-14)
  • Affected Areas: North Carolina; South Carolina; Virginia

Click the map to view the projected storm path.

Summary
Florence strengthened to hurricane status in the central Atlantic Ocean on Sept. 9. As of 1700 AST, the center of circulation remains far from land, approximately 2,310 km (1,435 miles) east-southeast of Wilmington, North Carolina. Florence is predicted to undergo rapid intensification over the coming days as it traverses an area of warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear; the system could attain Category 4 strength, with maximum sustained winds of 240 kph (150 mph) near the center of circulation by Sept. 12. 

While some models are coming into better agreement, uncertainty still exists in the forecasted track of Florence as it approaches the southeastern US Sept. 12-14. Several models indicate that the system could make landfall as a major Category 3 or 4 hurricane anywhere from the South Carolina-Georgia border to southern Virginia; currently, the most likely landfall location is near the North Carolina-South Carolina border late Sept. 13-14. A few models are also suggesting that the storm could remain just off the coast or recurve out to sea prior to landfall; however, the chances of this situation have decreased. Anticipate considerable changes in Florence's track and intensity forecast over the coming days. 

If Florence makes landfall, life-threatening weather conditions are likely in parts of the Carolinas and Virginia. Government officials in North Carolina, South Carolina, and Virginia have issued state of emergency declarations in anticipation of a landfalling hurricane. As forecasts become more clear and coastal weather alerts are issued by the National Hurricane Center, officials could start issuing mandatory evacuation orders, especially for coastal areas and barrier islands in the Carolinas. Contraflow lane reversals could be introduced on certain highways to facilitate any necessary evacuations. 

Ultimately, the potential impact to the region, including rainfall amounts, wind speeds, and storm surge levels are uncertain at this time. If the storm makes landfall, there is the possibility for the system to significantly slow or stall over the region, potentially bringing a long-duration and dangerous rainfall and flooding event in the Carolinas and parts of the Mid-Atlantic through at least Sept. 16. As the system strengthens over the coming days, forecast models will be able to better predict the location and magnitude of effects throughout the region. Nevertheless, anticipate and start to plan for extensive business and transport disruptions in the southeastern US starting late Sept. 12 and lasting through at least Sept. 16.

Advice
Those with business interests or travel arrangements in the southeastern US Sept. 12-16 should closely monitor updated tropical forecasts over the coming days. Review and be prepared to implement business continuity measures in the event of a potential landfall. Stockpile emergency supplies, including bottled water, non-perishable food, batteries, and first aid supplies. Home and business owners near the potential landfall site should be prepared to secure properties with necessary mitigation materials (e.g. storm shutters) well before the storm comes onshore. Confirm all transport reservations.

Resources
Weather
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov
National Weather Service: www.weather.gov


Update 3:
TS Florence to become major hurricane in the Atlantic Ocean. Landfall possible in the southeastern US Sept. 13-14.

Locations affected by this alert: Augusta, Georgia, Brunswick-Golden Isles, Georgia, Cape Hatteras, North Carolina, Charleston, South Carolina, Charlotte, North Carolina, Columbia, South Carolina, Fayetteville, North Carolina, Florence, South Carolina, Jacksonville, Florida, Jacksonville, North Carolina, Morehead City, North Carolina, Myrtle Beach, South Carolina, Nags Head, North Carolina, New Bern, North Carolina, Raleigh-Durham, North Carolina, Savannah, Georgia, Waycross, Georgia, Wilmington, North Carolina

  • Event: Tropical Storm Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 2,555 km (1,590 miles) east-southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 60 kts (110 kph, 70 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possibly in North or South Carolina (Sept. 13-14)
  • Affected Areas: Southeastern US (possibly northern Florida, Georgia, North Carolina, South Carolina)

Click the map to view the projected storm path.

Summary
Tropical Storm Florence is tracking westward in the central Atlantic Ocean, Sept. 8. As of 1700 AST, the center of circulation was approximately 2,555 km (1,590 miles) east-southeast of Myrtle Beach, South Carolina. Forecast models indicate that the storm will strengthen considerably over the coming days as it transits a region of warm sea surface temperatures and low wind shear. 

A considerable amount of uncertainty exists in the forecasted track of Florence past Sept. 10; however, several weather models indicate that the system could make landfall as a major Category 3 or 4 hurricane somewhere in the southeastern US Sept. 13-14. Florence could come onshore between northern Florida and North Carolina, with the most likely landfall location in the Carolinas. A few models are also suggesting that the storm could recurve out to sea prior to landfall; however, the chances of this situation have decreased. Anticipate considerable changes in Florence's track and intensity forecast over the coming days. 

If Florence makes landfall, it could bring dangerous weather conditions to parts of the southeastern US. Ultimately, the potential impact to the region, including rainfall amounts, wind speeds, and storm surge levels are uncertain at this time. As the system strengthens over the coming days, forecast models will be able to better predict the location and magnitude of effects throughout the region. Nevertheless, anticipate and start to plan for extensive business and transport disruptions in the southeastern US starting late Sept. 12 and lasting through at least Sept. 16. 

Advice
Those with business interests or travel arrangements in the southeastern US Sept. 12-16 should closely monitor updated tropical forecasts over the coming days. Review and be prepared to implement business continuity measures in the event of a potential landfall. Stockpile emergency supplies, including bottled water, non-perishable food, batteries, and first aid supplies. Home and business owners near the potential landfall site should be prepared to secure properties with necessary mitigation materials (e.g. storm shutters) well before the storm comes onshore. Confirm all transport reservations.

Resource
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov


Update 2: 
TS Florence moving away from Cape Verde, Sept. 1. Warnings discontinued; rain and wind likely to persist through the evening.

Locations affected by this alert: Cape Verde

  • Event: Tropical Storm Florence
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 400 km (250 miles) west of Praia, Cape Verde
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 35 kts (65 kph, 40 mph)
  • Affected Area: Cape Verde

Click the map to view the projected storm path.

Summary
Tropical Storm Florence formed west of Cape Verde, early Sept. 1. As of 1100 CVT, the center of the storm was approximately 400 km (250 miles) west of Praia. Forecast models indicate that the system will continue to gradually strengthen over the coming days as it tracks northwestward in the Atlantic Ocean. Although authorities have discontinued a tropical storm warning for the islands of Brava, Fogo, and Santiago, the tropical storm's outer rain bands will continue to produce some heavy rainfall and gusty winds in the Cape Verde islands through the evening of Sept. 1.

Hazardous Conditions
An additional 2.5-5 cm (1-2 inches) of rain is predicted to fall throughout the southern islands as the system moves away from land. Despite a decrease in the intensity of the rainfall, the threat of protracted areal flooding will persist in the coming days. Landslides could occur, especially in elevated areas. Lingering wind gusts could contribute to localized power outages in the southern Cape Verde islands. Coastal flooding and storm surge inundation will probably decrease along the southern coasts of Brava, Fogo, and Santiago throughout the day; however, rough seas could persist in the region through at least Sept. 2.

Transport
Ground, air, and maritime transport will likely start to normalize in Cape Verde throughout the day Sept. 1. Some protracted traffic disruptions are possible along regional roads, especially if floodwaters or landslides temporarily block some routes. Lingering flight delays and cancellations are also possible at regional airports, including those serving Praia (RAI) and Sao Filipe (SFL). Rough seas might temporarily disrupt some maritime vessel traffic in the southern Cape Verde islands through Sept. 2.

Advice
Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Seek updated information on road conditions before driving or routing shipments in areas that are prone to flooding or landslides. Plan accordingly for potential freight delivery delays if routing shipments through the affected area. Do not attempt to drive through flooded areas. Charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur. Confirm flights.

Resource
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov

 


Update 1: 
Rain bands of tropical disturbance reach Cape Verde islands Aug. 31. Tropical storm likely to form in the coming days.

This alert affects Cape Verde

  • Event: Possible tropical development
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 125 km (80 miles) south-southeast Praia, Cape Verde
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 30 kts (55 kph, 40 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Close approach to Brava, Fogo, and Santiago islands, Cape Verde (late Aug. 31)
  • Affected Area: Cape Verde 

Click the map to view the projected storm path.


Summary
A disturbance located south of the Cape Verde islands has slightly strengthened and become better organized since Aug. 30. As of 1700 CVT Aug. 31, the center of the tropical wave was approximately 125 km (80 miles) south-southeast of Praia. Despite the strengthening of the disturbance, it has not yet attained the characteristics of a tropical depression or tropical storm. The wave is expected to transition into an official tropical system by late Aug. 31 or Sept. 1 as it tracks northwestward away from land.

The following coastal warning remains in effect (1700 CVT Aug. 31):

  • Tropical Storm Warning: Brava, Fogo, and Santiago islands, Cape Verde

Hazardous Conditions
The tropical disturbance is expected to bring heavy rainfall to parts of Cape Verde through at least Sept. 1. The heaviest rain is likely to occur in the southern islands, including Brava, Fogo, and Santiago. Widespread rainfall totals of 5-10 cm (2-4 inches), with localized accumulations of up to 20 cm (8 inches), are predicted in the affected area. The heavy rain will probably prompt some flash and areal flooding along regional watercourses and in coastal areas. Landslides could occur, especially in elevated areas. Gusty winds could result in some localized power outages in the southern Cape Verde islands. Rough seas and some minor storm surge could occur along the southern and eastern coasts of Brava, Fogo, and Santiago.

Transport
The tropical disturbance will likely cause localized ground and air transport disruptions throughout the affected area through Sept. 1. Expect traffic delays, as floodwaters may inundate or wash away some roads and bridges. Mudslides could also block some roads, particularly those located in mountainous terrain. Heavy rainfall could prompt some flight delays and cancellations at regional airports, including those serving Praia (RAI) and Sao Filipe (SFL). Rough seas might temporarily disrupt some maritime vessel traffic in the southern Cape Verde islands through Sept. 1.

Advice
Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water, and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.

Resource
National Hurricane Center: www.nhc.noaa.gov