Last updated: Aug. 22, 10:00 a.m. EST.

Demonstrations in Hong Kong against a now-suspended Fugitive Offenders bill, which would have allowed the extradition of criminal suspects from Hong Kong to territories that Hong Kong does not have extradition agreements with, including mainland China, have escalated into a generally anti-Beijing and pro-democracy movement. The protests have resulted in clashes and transport disruptions in Hong Kong, including at Hong Kong International Airport. There is a very low possibility of a political solution to the disagreements between the Hong Kong government and the protest movement in the short term; demonstrations and related disruptions are likely to continue for weeks, if not months.

Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to organize demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts are likely for well-publicized marches, especially on weekends.

WorldAware will continue to monitor disturbances in Hong Kong. 

 

Navigate to each of the alert updates:

Warning Alert | Aug. 22Activists plan demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 23-25. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

Informational Alert | Aug. 20: WorldAware continues to monitor protest activity in Hong Kong.

Warning Alert | Aug. 16Activists announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, through Aug. 31. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 15Activists call for mass march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 18. Tight security, clashes, transport disruptions likely. Avoid the march route.

Warning Alert | Aug. 14Flights normalizing in Hong Kong, China, as of Aug. 14 after court injunction. Additional protests, disruptions possible.

Critical Alert | Aug. 13Departing flights suspended at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 13 amid protests. Disruptions likely through Aug. 14.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12Protest to resume at Hong Kong International Airport, China, from 1300 Aug. 13. Departing flights likely to restart at 0600.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12: Authorities to re-open Hong Kong International Airport, China, at 0600 Aug. 13 for departing flights. Arriving flights disrupted.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12: Authorities cancel all flights departing after 1800 at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 11: Activists call for additional protests at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions, clashes possible.


Warning Alert effective 11:50 GMT on Aug. 22: Activists plan demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 23-25. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

 

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Time Frame: Aug. 23-25
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport and business disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and police actions during ongoing protests intend to hold several demonstrations through Aug. 25. As of Aug. 22, the following actions have been proposed:

  • Aug. 23: Activists plan to form a human chain along the Island, Tsuen Wan, and Kwun Tong Mass Transit Railway (MTR) lines.
  • Aug. 23: Protesters to rally at Chater Garden 1730-2200.
  • Aug. 24: Demonstrators to gather at Junye Street Park Playground at 1300 and march to Kwun Tong Swimming Pool, 1330-1600.
  • Aug. 25: Activists to gather at South Kwai Fong Station at 1430 and march to Tsuen Wan Park from 1500.

Tens of thousands of people could participate in events planned Aug. 23-25.

A significant police presence is likely at all demonstrations. Although organizers have asked demonstrators to remain peaceful, clashes between police and protesters are likely, especially if officials do not approve the marches. More radical activists may erect roadblocks or protest in unauthorized areas. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which may trigger clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely during mass protests. Access to MTR stations may be limited during the Aug. 23 protest. Marches will almost certainly cause traffic congestion. Authorities often alter MTR operations during mass events, and trains could bypass stations in the affected neighborhoods.


 

Advice

Avoid announced events and other likely protest locations due to the likelihood of violence. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions Aug. 23-25. Consider alternative transport due to likely MTR disruptions. Follow all police instructions.


Informational Alert effective Aug. 20: WorldAware continues to monitor protest activity in Hong Kong.

 

WorldAware continues to monitor the protest activity in Hong Kong. While difficult to predict, there are several security triggers that we are watching for that could result in a more aggressive local law enforcement or government response. Those triggers include any significant loss of life (either pro-demonstration or government/law enforcement officials), looting, significant property damage or arson, and continued protest activities resulting in prolonged disruption of essential services. Should any of these triggers occur, the change in government and law enforcement response may occur swiftly and without further warning; this could also result in a denial of media coverage or commercial travel in and out of the region.

Organizations must determine their risk tolerance for continued operations in Hong Kong given the intelligence and media reporting available. Organizations should consider the delay of non-essential travel to the region and should be prepared to initiate a “no travel” order should the security situation deteriorate. Organizations should also consider the temporary proactive relocation of expat personnel in the region to a safe location.

In addition, WorldAware’s Global Assistance and Response team recommends:

  • Postponing travel to Hong Kong if the travel is not time-sensitive.
  • Establishing automatic safety check-in policies where applicable.
  • Determining a work-from-home order notification process.
  • Stockpiling 3-5 days’ worth of food and water in case shelter-in-place is required.
  • Planning multiple routes to-and-from destinations to avoid demonstrations.
  • Keeping extra cash-on-hand in case access to banks is restricted or banks are closed.
  • Establishing rally points in case individuals are separated from family or colleagues.
  • Carrying appropriate identification at all times and fully complying with security checkpoints and directions.
  • Complying with curfews should they be established.
  • Registering with your local Embassy or Consulate.

 


Warning Alert effective Aug. 16, 07:50 GMT: Activists announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, through Aug. 31. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

 

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Activists have announced additional actions in Hong Kong to demand that the government formally withdraw a bill amending the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, establish an independent commission to investigate police violence, and move on political reforms. Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts are likely for well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. 

Although unconfirmed, activists have proposed the following events through the end of August:

  • Aug. 16: Protesters to gather at Chater Garden 2000-2200 to call for international support. Police-approved event.
  • Aug. 17: Education professionals to gather at Chater Garden at 1100 and march to Government House.
  • Aug. 17: Demonstrators intend to gather at Hung Hom Harbour at 1530 and march to To Kwa Wan. Event banned.
  • Aug. 17: Protesters to meet at Chater Garden at 1830 and march to Government House.
  • Aug. 17: Rally slated to occur at Edinburgh Square 1930-2130.
  • Aug. 18: Civil Human Rights Front event planned at Victoria Park; march to Chater Road possible from 1500. Police have approved a rally at the park 1000-2300 but banned the march. Previously announced events called off.
  • Aug. 24: Activists to march in Kwun Tong from 1330.
  • Aug. 25: Demonstrations planned in Tsuen Wan and Kwai Tsing districts.
  • Aug. 31: Civil Human Rights Front has called for a mass march.

Unannounced protests are also likely to occur. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in central business areas of Hong Kong Island, such as Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Activists have increasingly targeted police stations in the territory. Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups occasionally hold demonstrations in support of police and the government. While most gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible; tens of thousands of people marched in the city July 20 in support of police.

The Confederation of Trade Unions (CTU), which helped execute a territory-wide general strike Aug. 5, has warned that the organization could arrange additional labor actions. CTU claims that nearly 350,000 people participated in the labor action. Tens of thousands of people rallied in Sha Tin, Tsuen Wan, Tuen Mun, Wong Tai Sin, Tai Po, Mong Kok, and Admiralty, resulting in widespread transport disruptions and clashes. Mass demonstrations are likely if further strikes take place.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel during demonstrations. Police have banned some recent protests due to security concerns; however, activists have defied the orders, leading to clashes. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups are also likely; reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters. The highest risk of fighting between rival groups is in the New Territories, where many areas have historically strong ties to mainland China, but skirmishes could occur elsewhere.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Aug. 16, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Demonstrators are increasingly targeting transport infrastructure, leading to recurrent transport disruptions. Protesters gathered at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), Aug. 9-13. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights 13, as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside of designated areas; officials are allowing gatherings in two areas of the Arrivals Hall. Though airport operations have normalized, further demonstrations are possible; unconfirmed reports suggest demonstrators could seek to disrupt airport operations on Tuesday and Friday evenings in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are also likely to continue. Activists damaged traffic signals during the Aug. 5 strike and have sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous demonstrations in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions can also occur, usually if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protesters will probably continue to target Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations sporadically. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines. MTR service disruptions of up to several hours could occur during protests.


 

Background and Analysis

While the government has suspended the extradition law amendments, Chief Executive Carrie Lam has not formally withdrawn the bill. Her government has also failed to meet other protester demands, especially the creation of an independent commission to investigate clashes between protesters and police. The extradition law bill has become a lightning rod for discontent among some segments of Hong Kong society that believe that Beijing's influence is eroding the territory's freedoms. The government maintains the reforms are necessary to close loopholes in Hong Kong's existing extradition treaties and to prevent the city from acting as a haven for mainland Chinese criminals. Opponents of the proposed changes to the extradition law fear the amendments would allow human rights abuses and undermine Hong Kong's judicial system. The government's perceived inflexibility suggests that protests could continue for several more weeks.

Activists have also added Lam's resignation and democratic reforms to their demands, though either move is unlikely. The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office - the Chinese government body responsible for Hong Kong - has continued to support Lam and police fully. State media in China has increased its rhetoric against the actions in recent weeks, prompting concern that authorities could intensify their response to the protests. The People's Liberation Army (PLA) has also reportedly deployed to Shenzhen; however, the likelihood of military intervention remains low. Officials in both Beijing and Hong Kong continue to state that police are capable of managing the demonstrations. Hong Kong officials could seek to ban large protests temporarily, effectively making rallies illegal. Police are also reportedly testing water cannon and ink, as police have been unable to identify and arrest many activists during the demonstrations. Distrust in the government and police is high among regular demonstrators, and a police crackdown or particularly violent clashes could precipitate more mass rallies and marches.

 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Warning Alert effective Aug. 15: Activists call for mass march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 18. Tight security, clashes, transport disruptions likely. Avoid the march route.

  • Incident: Mass march
  • Location: Hong Kong Island 
  • Start Time/Date: 1430 Aug. 18
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport and business disruptions; likely clashes

 

 

Summary
 

The Civil Human Rights Front has called for a mass march on Hong Kong Island, Aug. 18, against alleged police brutality during ongoing protests over amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance. Activists will also press protesters demands. The group plans to gather at Victoria Park at 1430 and march through the city to Chater Garden in Central from 1500. Police have not approved the event, but the demonstration could take place without official approval. Tens to hundreds of thousands of supporters are likely to participate in the event amid widespread criticism of the police response to protests in some instances.

A significant police presence is likely at Victoria Park and along the march route. Though organizers have asked protesters to remain peaceful, clashes between police and protesters are likely, especially if officials do not approve the march. More radical activists have attempted to erect roadblocks or protest in unauthorized areas during previous events organized by the alliance, usually after the main event ends, leading to violence. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which has the potential to spark clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely in the Causeway Bay, Central, Wan Chai, and Admiralty areas of Hong Kong Island if the march takes place. The demonstration will almost certainly cause traffic congestion in areas along the march route. Mass Transit Rail (MTR) authorities often alter operations during mass events; trains could bypass stations in the affected neighborhoods.


 

Background and Analysis
 

The Civil Human Rights Front, an alliance of 50 democratic activists groups, has organized several rallies that have drawn hundreds of thousands of participants since June. The group claims that more than 1 million protesters marched against the government's proposed amendments June 9 and more than 2 million people joined a march in the city June 16, though police estimates are considerably lower. The alliance is slated to hold another mass march Aug. 31 in Hong Kong, though organizers have not provided details on that demonstration.

 

Advice
 

Avoid the march route and other likely protest locations, especially around Chater Garden the evening of Aug. 15, due to the likelihood of violent clashes. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions in north-central areas of Hong Kong Island and allow additional time to reach destinations Aug. 18. Follow all police instructions.


Warning Alert effective Aug. 14 at 05:58 GMT: Flights normalizing in Hong Kong, China, as of Aug. 14 after court injunction. Additional protests, disruptions possible.

 

  • Incident: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug. 15
  • Impact: Increased security, flight disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) are attempting to normalize operations as of Aug. 14, after highly disruptive protests at the departures area forced the cancellation of departing flights for a second day. Airlines continue to clear flight backlogs but have canceled dozens of flights Aug. 14; lingering disruptions are possible into Aug. 15.

A court granted the Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) a temporary injunction Aug. 14 banning further protests outside of designated areas at HKG. Despite the injunction, additional rallies could occur at the airport in the coming days. AA officials previously allowed demonstrations to take place in the arrivals area.

Increased security is highly likely at HKG in the coming days. Authorities may erect barriers near the check-in counters and departure gates to ensure only passengers enter the area. Police could intervene if activists attempt to gather outside of approved protest areas, likely leading to clashes. Further demonstrations in the departures area could prompt more flight disruptions.


 

Background and Analysis

Protesters have gathered at HKG since Aug. 9, but the demonstration escalated Aug. 12, when thousands of activists arrived to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent protests. Airlines and airport operators had delayed or canceled more than 300 flights at HKG, Aug. 13, when hundreds of activists staged a sit-in, blocking access to check-in counters and departure gates. Clashes took place in several areas; demonstrators clashed with both passengers they suspected of being undercover officers, and uniformed police who fired pepper spray and used batons.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on protests at HKG, as activists may not announce plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance at HKG through at least Aug. 15. Confirm ground transport to and from HKG as a precaution. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at the airport. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.
 


Critical Alert effective Aug. 13 at 10:38 GMT: Departing flights suspended at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 13 amid protests. Disruptions likely through Aug. 14.

  • Incident: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug. 14
  • Impact: Increased security, flight disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities have canceled all remaining departing flights at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) as of 1730 Aug. 13, after thousands of protesters blocked access to departure gates. Check-in counters for many airlines are closed, and only passengers who checked in before 1630 are allowed to board flights. Officials have not canceled any arriving flights as of 1800. However, disruptions to arriving flights remain possible if the protest continues; officials issued a notice ordering all flights from mainland China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their points of origin during a similar protest Aug. 12. As of Aug. 13, cargo flights remain unaffected.

Lingering disruptions are almost certain even after flight operations resume, as carriers work to clear their passenger backlogs; authorities say flight disruptions are likely to continue through at least Aug. 14. Further protests could occur at HKG in the coming days and may exacerbate flight disruptions. Rallies at the airport have remained peaceful; however, clashes between activists and police are possible, especially if authorities attempt to clear the demonstration by force.

 

Background and Analysis

Protesters have gathered at HKG since Aug. 9, but the demonstration escalated Aug. 12, when thousands of activists arrived to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent protests. Airlines and airport operators already delayed or canceled more than 300 flights at HKG, Aug. 13, as officials tried to normalize operations.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing, or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 14. Confirm ground transport to and from HKG. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Critical Alert effective Aug. 12 at 17:57 GMT: Protest to resume at Hong Kong International Airport, China, from 1300 Aug. 13. Departing flights likely to restart at 0600.

  • Incident: Protest, flight cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug 13
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Activists have called for large demonstrations to resume at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) starting at 1300 Aug. 13. Thousands of protesters gathered at the facility from the afternoon of Aug. 12 to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent demonstrations; most participants had left the facility by late the same day. The protests at HKG have remained peaceful. However, clashes between activists and police are possible, especially if authorities attempt to clear the demonstration by force. Significant turnout in the Aug. 13 protest, or major clashes between activists and police, would almost certainly prompt additional flight cancellations and delays at HKG.

Authorities canceled over 180 departing flights from the afternoon of Aug. 12. Officials also issued a notice ordering that all flights to HKG from mainland China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their points of origin. It remains unclear how long the regional restrictions on inbound flights will remain in place. Most airlines have suspended other scheduled services to HKG, though the majority of inbound long-haul flights have continued. As of early Aug. 13, cargo flights have remained unaffected. Authorities at HKG plan to re-open the facility for departing flights beginning at 0600 Aug 13. Lingering disruptions are almost certain even after flight operations resume, as carriers work to clear their passenger backlogs.

In addition to flight disruptions, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions for the duration of the protests. Demonstrations may disrupt bus and Metro Transit Railway (MTR) services to and from HGK.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters. Further related protests are highly likely in the coming days

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 13. Confirm ground transport availability to and from HKG. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Critical Alert effective Aug. 12 at 14:00 GMT: Authorities to re-open Hong Kong International Airport, China, at 0600 Aug. 13 for departing flights. Arriving flights disrupted.

 

  • Incident: Protest, light cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug 13
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) have stated they plan to re-open the facility from 0600 Aug 13 for departing flights, after over 180 departing flights were canceled Aug 12. Authorities took this action after halting all check-in services for departing flights, due to the presence of large numbers of protesters at landside portions of the terminal. In addition, most flights scheduled to arrive late Aug. 12 have been canceled or diverted. Authorities issued a notice the evening of Aug. 12 ordering that all flights to HKG from elsewhere in China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their origin points; most airlines have canceled these flights. In addition, most airlines operating flights to Hong Kong from beyond Asia have canceled their flights, with the notable exception of Cathay Pacific (CX), whose long-haul flights to Hong Kong scheduled to arrive early Aug. 13 are largely operating as scheduled. Cargo flights have remained unaffected. Airport officials have urged passengers not to come to HGK Aug. 13 unless their flights have been confirmed.

Authorities took the action after thousands of protesters arrived at HKG the afternoon of Aug. 12, resulting in congestion there, as well as on approaches and public transport to the facility. The majority of protesters have subsequently departed the airport, and congestion has eased. The protest at HKG remained peaceful. Authorities deployed additional personnel to monitor and contain the event.

In addition to disruption to flight services, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions. Once services normalize, lingering disruptions are almost certain as authorities work to clear the significant backlog of flights.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters. Further such action is possible in the coming days

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 13. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Critical Alert effective Aug. 12 09:17 GMT: Authorities cancel all flights departing after 1800 at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions likely.

 

  • Incident: Protest, flight cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport
  • Start Time/Date: Afternoon Aug. 12
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions, clashes

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) have halted all check-in services for departing flights for at least the remainder of Aug. 12, due to the presence of large numbers of protesters at the Arrivals Hall. Flights for which passengers have already checked-in will depart on schedule until 1800; authorities have cancelled all flights departing after 1800. Incoming flights have not been impacted, and are arriving as scheduled.

Authorities took the action after thousands of protesters arrived at HKG the afternoon of Aug. 12, resulting in congestion there, as well as on approaches to the facility. Thus far, the protest at HKG has remained peaceful. Authorities have deployed additional personnel to monitor and contain the event; the protest has resulted in severe disruption to services at HGK, which could increase the possibility of police using force to disperse participants. This threat is further elevated by the fact that organizers have not sought police permission for the gatherings at the airport.

In addition to disruption to flight services, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters in recent days and weeks.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if departing HKG prior to 1800. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Warning Alert effective Aug.12 01:54 GMT: Activists call for additional protests at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions, clashes possible.

 

  • Incident: Protest, sit-in
  • Location: Arrivals Hall, Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Start Time/Date: 1300 Aug. 12
  • Impact: Increased security; possible air and ground transport disruptions, clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and alleged police violence against protesters are calling for further demonstrations at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), starting at 1300 Aug. 12. Several thousand people could participate in the action.

Dozens of protesters remain at the Arrivals Hall of the airport as of early Aug. 12 following a three-day sit-in demonstration that began Aug. 9; activists have set up a small staging area in the airport, and protest activity could persist in the short term. While recent actions at HKG have remained peaceful, passengers could face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions. Organizers have not sought police permission for the gatherings at the airport. Authorities will almost certainly deploy additional personnel to monitor and contain the event; police could use force to disperse the participants if the protest risks becoming too disruptive to airport operations.


 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if departing HKG, especially during the time frame of any demonstration. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at the Arrivals Hall. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.