Last updated: Oct. 22, 11:13 a.m. EST.

Demonstrations in Hong Kong against a now-suspended Fugitive Offenders bill, which would have allowed the extradition of criminal suspects from Hong Kong to territories that Hong Kong does not have extradition agreements with, including mainland China, have escalated into a generally anti-Beijing and pro-democracy movement. The protests have resulted in clashes and transport disruptions in Hong Kong, including at Hong Kong International Airport. There is a very low possibility of a political solution to the disagreements between the Hong Kong government and the protest movement in the short term; demonstrations and related disruptions are likely to continue for weeks, if not months.

Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to organize demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts are likely for well-publicized marches, especially on weekends.

WorldAware will continue to monitor disturbances in Hong Kong. 

 

Navigate to each of the alert updates:

Warning Alert: Oct. 22Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 23-27. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

Warning Alert: Oct. 17Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 18-22. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 15Authorities increase security measures near Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, as Council reconvenes from Oct. 16. Protests likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 14Mass rally taking place at Chater Garden in Hong Kong, China, the evening of Oct. 14. Transport disruptions ongoing. Clashes possible.

Warning Alert | Oct. 10Public transport disruptions to continue in Hong Kong, China through at least early Oct. 12. Confirm transport reservations.

Warning Alert | Oct. 9Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 10-14. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 7Protests to resume in Hong Kong, China, the afternoon of Oct. 7. MTR disruptions ongoing. Violence, localized disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 6Partial MTR service resumes in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 6; activists hold additional protests. Transport disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 5Partial Airport Express service resumes in Hong Kong, China; other Metro Transit Railway services remain suspended through Oct. 5. 

Warning Alert | Oct. 4Authorities in Hong Kong, China, to extend Metro Transit Railway closure through at least 1200 Oct. 5 due to disruptive protests.

Warning Alert | Oct. 4Authorities in Hong Kong, China, suspend all MTR services late Oct. 4 following disruptive protests and arson incidents. Avoid all protests.

Warning Alert | Oct. 4Activists announce protests in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 4-7 amid invocation of Emergency Regulations Ordinance. Violence, disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 2Protests over political reform, police investigation to continue in Hong Kong, China, as of Oct. 2. Localized disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Oct. 1: Activists call for general strike in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 2. Business and transportation disruptions likely. Avoid demonstrations.

Warning Alert | Oct. 1Violent protests occurring in several areas of Hong Kong, China, Oct. 1. Additional clashes likely. Avoid all demonstrations.

Warning Alert | Sept. 30Activist announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, for National Day Oct. 1. Tight security, transport disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Sept. 26Activists announce further actions in Hong Kong, China, through Sept. 30. Localized disruptions, clashes likely. Avoid protests.

Warning Alert | Sept. 25Officials close Sha Tin MTR station in Hong Kong, China, following clashes between police and protesters late Sept. 25. Avoid the area.

Warning Alert | Sept. 25: Protests possible in Hong Kong, China, during government's first Community Dialogue meeting at Queen Elizabeth Stadium, 1900-2100 Sept. 26.

Warning Alert | Sept. 20Activists to continue demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, as of Sept. 20. Events planned through at least Oct. 1. Avoid protests.

Warning Alert | Sept. 12Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Sept. 14 and 21. Disruptions, clashes possible.

Warning Alert | Sept. 6Activists to hold several demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 6-8. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Sept. 5Protests likely to continue in Hong Kong, China, despite withdraw of controversial bill. Events announced through Sept. 21.

Warning Alert | Sept. 3Activists plan protests in Hong Kong, China, through at least Sept. 14. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 30Activists likely to protest, march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 31, despite police ban. Tight security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 29Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Sept. 1-2. Flight disruptions, clashes possible.

Warning Alert | Aug. 29Activists plan general strike, rallies in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 2-3. Business and transportation disruptions likely. Clashes possible.

Warning Alert | Aug. 22Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 24. Flight disruptions, clashes possible.

Warning Alert | Aug. 22Activists plan demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 23-25. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

Informational Alert | Aug. 20: WorldAware continues to monitor protest activity in Hong Kong.

Warning Alert | Aug. 16Activists announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, through Aug. 31. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 15Activists call for mass march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 18. Tight security, clashes, transport disruptions likely. Avoid the march route.

Warning Alert | Aug. 14Flights normalizing in Hong Kong, China, as of Aug. 14 after court injunction. Additional protests, disruptions possible.

Critical Alert | Aug. 13Departing flights suspended at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 13 amid protests. Disruptions likely through Aug. 14.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12Protest to resume at Hong Kong International Airport, China, from 1300 Aug. 13. Departing flights likely to restart at 0600.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12: Authorities to re-open Hong Kong International Airport, China, at 0600 Aug. 13 for departing flights. Arriving flights disrupted.

Critical Alert | Aug. 12: Authorities cancel all flights departing after 1800 at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions likely.

Warning Alert | Aug. 11: Activists call for additional protests at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions, clashes possible.

 


Oct. 22 | Warning Alert
Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 23-27. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 22 Oct 2019 15:08 GMT and is scheduled to expire 27 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Oct. 23-27
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business disruptions

 

Summary

Activists in Hong Kong intend to stage anti-government protests Oct. 23-27 amid ongoing heightened political tensions in the territory. Protests, which were originally prompted by a planned revision to Hong Kong's extradition law, have expanded to a generalized movement calling for political reforms and independent investigations into alleged police brutality, among other demands. Clashes and transport disruptions associated with the demonstrations escalated significantly from early October after the Hong Kong government invoked the Emergency Regulations Ordinance to issue a new regulation banning face masks during unapproved demonstrations. As of Oct. 22, activists have announced the following protests:

  • Oct. 23: Rally at the British Consulate General, from 1930.
  • Oct. 24: Hong Kong-Catalonia Solidarity Assembly at Chater Garden, 1900-2100.
  • Oct. 25: Four morning commute marches planned from 0700. Participants to march from Kowloon Bay Mass Transit Railway (MTR) Station to the Kwun Tong Commercial District via Kwun Tong Road, from the Star Ferry Pier to Mongkok via Nathan Road, from Chater Garden to Sheung Wan via Des Voeux Road, and from Fortress Hill MTR Station to Taikoo Place via King's Road.
  • Oct. 26: Protest at Tamar Park, from 1300.
  • Oct. 27: Rally at Kwun Tong Promenade, from 1600.

Additional unannounced protests are highly likely. Violence will probably occur at many locations; activists may erect roadblocks, start fires, throw projectiles - including petrol bombs - and vandalize property. Protesters usually target government and police buildings, and MTR facilities and businesses that are perceived as supporting the Hong Kong government or Beijing.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and at impromptu protest locations. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters. In some instances, police have also utilized live ammunition as warning shots or after being attacked. Fast-moving clashes are likely in areas where demonstrations take place. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes. Attacks on MTR facilities are likely to prompt localized station closures; networkwide service disruptions are possible.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or organizing early-release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or record demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Oct. 17 | Warning Alert
Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 18-22. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 17 Oct 2019 17:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 22 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Time Frame: Oct. 18-22
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business disruptions

 

Summary

Activists in Hong Kong intend to stage anti-government protests Oct. 18-22 amid ongoing heightened political tensions in the territory. Protests, which were originally prompted by a planned revision to Hong Kong's extradition law, have expanded to a generalized movement calling for political reforms and independent investigations into alleged police brutality, among other demands. Clashes and transport disruptions associated with the demonstrations escalated significantly from early October after the Hong Kong government invoked the Emergency Regulations Ordinance to issue a new regulation banning face masks during unapproved demonstrations. As of early Oct. 18, activists have announced the following protests:

  • Oct. 18: Human chains along Tsuen Wan, Kwun Tong, Island, and East Rail Mass Transit Railway (MTR) lines, from 1900
  • Oct. 19: Prayer rally at Chater Garden from 1930
  • Oct. 20: Protest march from Salisbury Garden to West Kowloon Station from 1330
  • Oct. 21: Sit-in at Yuen Long station from 1900
  • Oct. 22: Protest at Landmark North, Sheung Shui, from 2100

Additional unannounced protests are highly likely. Violence will probably occur at many locations; activists may erect roadblocks, start fires, throw projectiles - including petrol bombs - and vandalize property. Protesters usually target government and police buildings, and MTR facilities and businesses that are perceived as supporting the Hong Kong government or Beijing.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and at impromptu protest locations. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters. In some instances, police have also fired warning shots with live ammunition. Fast-moving clashes are likely in areas where demonstrations take place. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes. Attacks on MTR facilities are likely to prompt localized station closures; system-wide service disruptions are possible.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or organizing early-release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or record demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Oct. 15 | Warning Alert
Authorities increase security measures near Legislative Council in Hong Kong, China, as Council reconvenes from Oct. 16. Protests likely.

 

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This alert began 15 Oct 2019 20:54 GMT and is scheduled to expire 23 Oct 2019 20:00 GMT.

  • Event: Legislative Council reconvenes
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Start Date: Oct. 16
  • Impact: Heightened security; localized transport disruptions; likely protests

 

Summary

Authorities have increased security measures in and around the Legislative Council complex in Hong Kong ahead of the scheduled Oct. 16 reconvening of the legislature. Legislative Council functions have largely been suspended since July 1, when protesters stormed and vandalized the facility. Police have deployed numerous personnel and banned unauthorized gatherings near the Legislative Council as a precaution.

Despite official restrictions, anti-government protesters will likely attempt to stage demonstrations near the Legislative Council from Oct. 16. Demonstrators may gather in nearby areas, including along adjacent roadways and at the Tamar Culture Plaza. Hundreds of activists may join in demonstrations. Protests are especially likely during Legislative Council meetings, which are typically held during normal working hours on weekdays, and in the evenings. Because of official restrictions on demonstrations near the facility, activist groups are unlikely to publicize their actions in advance. Clashes between police and demonstrators are highly likely at any demonstrations that take place. Police may implement road closures in nearby areas as a precaution; authorities could also close the nearby Admiralty Mass Transit Railway (MTR) station in the event of disruptive protests.


 

Advice

Exercise caution near the Legislative Council complex. Allow additional time for transportation near the facility. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations.
 


Oct. 14 | Warning Alert 
Mass rally taking place at Chater Garden in Hong Kong, China, the evening of Oct. 14. Transport disruptions ongoing. Clashes possible.

 

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This alert began 14 Oct 2019 13:42 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Oct 2019 18:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Protest
  • Location: Chater Garden, Hong Kong 
  • Time/Date: Evening Oct. 14
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Thousands of people are protesting at Chater Garden and surrounding streets in Central, Hong Kong, the evening of Oct. 14. Rally for Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act Organising Committee called for the demonstration, which police approved, to demand the US government pass the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act. Police are monitoring the event, which is also blocking sections of Des Voeux Road, Chater Road, and Queensway.

Localized transport disruptions are occurring throughout Central. Although the demonstration has remained peaceful as of 2100, clashes between police and protesters are possible, particularly after the event ends at 2230. Activists could also gather in other locations in the territory following the rally, leading to localized disruptions in other areas of the city. Mass Transit Railway (MTR) officials intend to halt all train, light rail, and bus services from 2200, though Airport Express service will continue to operate between Hong Kong Station and Hong Kong International Airport (HKG).


 

Advice

Avoid the rally due to the potential for violence. Use alternative routes to avoid the affected area in Central. Plan for MTR disruptions; allow additional time to reach destinations.
 


Oct. 10 | Warning Alert
Public transport disruptions to continue in Hong Kong, China through at least early Oct. 12. Confirm transport reservations.

 

This alert began 10 Oct 2019 23:06 GMT and is scheduled to expire 13 Oct 2019 06:00 GMT.

  • Event: Public transport disruptions
  • Location: Multiple locations, Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Through at early Oct. 12
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, increased traffic congestion

 

Summary

Significant public transport disruptions are set to continue in Hong Kong through at least late Oct. 11; additional, system-wide shutdowns are possible in the subsequent days. Officials plan to close Metro Transit Railway (MTR) services, except for the Airport Express line, at 2200 Oct. 12. While most MTR services are likely to resume around 0600 Oct. 13, further disruptions, including station closures, increased wait times, and restrictions on operating hours, may occur. Additionally, as of early Oct. 11, the light rail stations at Yau Oi, Tin Wing, Ginza, Tin Wu, Tin Tsz, and Tin Shui Wai, are closed indefinitely. Authorities say multiple incidents of arson and vandalism targeting MTR facilities from Oct. 4 forced the closures and disruptions.

MTR disruptions have increased demand for alternative transport, including buses, ferries, taxis, and private cars. Increased traffic congestion will likely continue for the duration of the public transport disruptions.


 

Advice

Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Confirm taxis and other transport reservations, as demand is likely to be high. Allow additional time for ground transport throughout Hong Kong. Avoid all protests due to likely further clashes.
 


Oct. 9 | Warning Alert
Activists announce protests at multiple locations in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 10-14. Violence, transport disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 09 Oct 2019 17:12 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Oct 2019 19:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Oct. 10-14
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business disruptions

 

Summary

Activists in Hong Kong have announced antigovernment protests Oct. 10-14, amid ongoing heightened political tensions in the territory. Protests, which were originally prompted by a planned revision to Hong Kong extradition law, have expanded to a generalized movement demanding political reforms and independent investigations into alleged police brutality, among other demands. Clashes and transport disruptions associated with the demonstrations escalated significantly from Oct. 4, when the Hong Kong government invoked the Emergency Regulations Ordinance to issue a new regulation banning face masks during unapproved demonstrations. As of early Oct. 10, activists have announced the following protests:

  • Oct. 10: Rally to celebrate the 1911 Xinhai Revolution and founding of the Republic of China, in Sun Yat Sen Garden, Tuen Mun, 0900-1100
  • Oct. 10: Protest at Tsim Sha Tsui Police Station
  • Oct. 12: Protest at New Town Plaza in Sha Tin from 2000
  • Oct. 13: Rally at Victoria Park from 1900
  • Oct. 13: Rally at Edinburgh Place from 1900
  • Oct. 14: Rally at Edinburgh Place from 1900

Additional unannounced protests are highly likely. Violence will probably occur at many locations; activists may erect roadblocks, start fires, throw projectiles - including petrol bombs - and vandalize property. Protesters usually target government and police buildings, and - increasingly - Mass Transit Railway (MTR) facilities and businesses that have expressed support for the government or Beijing.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and at impromptu protest locations. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters. In some instances, police have also fired warning shots with live ammunition. Fast-moving clashes are likely in areas where future demonstrations take place. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes. Attacks on MTR facilities are likely to prompt localized station closures; system-wide service disruptions are possible.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or organizing early-release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Oct. 7 | Warning Alert
Protests to resume in Hong Kong, China, the afternoon of Oct. 7. MTR disruptions ongoing. Violence, localized disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 07 Oct 2019 07:48 GMT and is scheduled to expire 08 Oct 2019 05:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Disruptive protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Date: Oct. 7
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Activists are planning to hold protests in all districts of Hong Kong from the afternoon of Oct. 7, following days of violent unrest. As of 1500 Oct. 7, demonstrations are slated to take place in the following locations:

  • Hong Kong Island: Aberdeen Centre, The Westwood, Great George Street, City Plaza, and Chai Wan overhead bridge.
  • Kowloon: Treasure World, APM Mall, Langham Place, Temple Mall, Ma Tau Wai Road Playground, Nam Cheong Road and V-Walk
  • New Territories: Maritime Square, Yoho Mall, MOSTown, Landmark North, Mega Mall, Tsuen Wan Playground, Kwai Fung Plaza, New Town Plaza, Tuen Mun Town Plaza, Popcorn Mall

Turnout is likely to vary by location; however, thousands of people will probably participate in the demonstrations. Additional, unannounced events are likely to occur at other sites, especially near police stations and other government facilities. Clashes between police and protesters are expected to continue, especially during the evening.

Metro Transit Railway (MTR) authorities intend to halt all services at 1800 due to potential unrest and to carry out maintenance and repair work. Approximately half of MTR stations remain closed Oct. 7 following destruction throughout the rail network. As of 1500, officials are still operating Airport Express service between Hong Kong Station and Hong Kong International Airport (HKG); however, trains are not making any stops. MTR could halt service on the line without notice. Significant incidents of violence, arson, or vandalism may prompt authorities to extend public transport service suspensions.


 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to the potential for further clashes. Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby.
 


Oct. 6 | Warning Alert
Partial MTR service resumes in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 6; activists hold additional protests. Transport disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 06 Oct 2019 07:47 GMT and is scheduled to expire 06 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Disruptive protests
  • Location: Multiple locations, Hong Kong 
  • Date: Oct. 6
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Officials from Hong Kong's Metro Transit Railway (MTR) announced the resumption of MTR services Oct. 6. However, multiple train stations will remain closed due to damage. MTR services will end by 2100 for rail officials to conduct repair and maintenance works. Airport Express service remains operational, but trains will only service Airport and Hong Kong stations at 10-minute intervals through closing.

Additionally, protesters plan to hold additional demonstrations, Oct. 6.

  • Hong Kong Island: March from SOGO at Causeway Bay toward Chater Garden
  • Kowloon: March to begin at Salisbury Garden toward Kowloon Tong, including possibly the People's Liberation Army Kowloon East Barracks; protest endpoint will depend on security situation on the ground

Thousands of activists could participate in each gathering. Additional, unannounced demonstrations are likely to occur at other locations, especially near police stations and other government facilities. Clashes between police and protesters are likely to continue, especially during the evening. Significant incidents of violence, arson, or vandalism may prompt authorities to extend public transport service suspensions.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to the potential for further clashes. Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby.

 


Oct. 5 | Warning Alert
Partial Airport Express service resumes in Hong Kong, China; other Metro Transit Railway services remain suspended through Oct. 5.

 

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This alert began 05 Oct 2019 07:33 GMT and is scheduled to expire 05 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Disruptive protests
  • Location: Multiple locations, Hong Kong 
  • Start Date: Late Oct. 4
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Officials from Hong Kong's Metro Transit Railway (MTR) announced the partial resumption of Airport Express service as of 1430 Oct. 5. The service will only operate between Airport and Hong Kong stations at 10-minute intervals. Other MTR services, including Light Rail and MTR bus, remain suspended across the territory through Oct. 5, as protest activity continues to affect safety checks and maintenance work. Service disruptions began late Oct. 4 after protesters implemented roadblocks and set fire to MTR facilities and mainland Chinese businesses at multiple locations. MTR officials did not say when they expect normal services to resume; significant transport and business disruptions are likely throughout Hong Kong for the duration of the MTR service suspensions.

Protesters plan additional demonstrations at shopping centers in Kowloon New Territories and Central during the afternoon of Oct. 5. Additional, unannounced demonstrations are likely to occur at other locations, especially near police stations and other government facilities. Clashes between police and protesters are likely to continue, especially during the evening. Significant incidents of violence, arson, or vandalism may prompt authorities to extend public transport service suspensions.


 

Advice

Consider authorizing a liberal telecommuting policy or early-release arrangement for Oct. 5. Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Avoid all protests due to the potential for further clashes. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby.
 


Oct. 4 | Warning Alert
Authorities in Hong Kong, China, to extend Metro Transit Railway closure through at least 1200 Oct. 5 due to disruptive protests.

 

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This alert began 04 Oct 2019 20:46 GMT and is scheduled to expire 05 Oct 2019 08:00 GMT.

  • Event: Disruptive protests
  • Location: Multiple locations, Hong Kong 
  • Start Date: Late Oct. 4
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Officials plan to extend the closure of all Metro Transit Railway (MTR) stations in Hong Kong through at least 1200 Oct. 5 following multiple incidents of arson and vandalism targeting MTR facilities during protests. Light rail services will also remain suspended. The territory-wide service disruptions began late Oct. 4 after protesters implemented roadblocks and set fire to MTR facilities and mainland Chinese businesses at multiple locations. Significant transport and business disruptions are likely throughout Hong Kong for the duration of the MTR and light rail service suspensions.

Protesters plan additional demonstrations at shopping centers in Kowloon New Territories and Central during the afternoon of Oct. 5. Additional, unannounced demonstrations are likely to occur at other locations, especially near police stations and other government facilities. Clashes between police and protesters are likely to continue, especially during the evening. Significant incidents of violence, arson, or vandalism may prompt authorities to extend public transport service suspensions.


 

Advice

Consider authorizing a liberal telecommuting policy or early-release arrangement for Oct. 5. Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Avoid all protests due to the potential for further clashes. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby.
 


Oct. 4 | Warning Alert
Authorities in Hong Kong, China, suspend all MTR services late Oct. 4 following disruptive protests and arson incidents. Avoid all protests.

 

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This alert began 04 Oct 2019 15:36 GMT and is scheduled to expire 04 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Disruptive protests
  • Location: Multiple locations, Hong Kong 
  • Start Date: Late Oct. 4
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Officials have closed all Metro Transit Railway (MTR) stations in Hong Kong from late Oct. 4 following multiple incidents of arson targeting MTR stations at protests. As of late Oct. 4, clashes between police and protesters have occurred at several locations throughout Hong Kong, including Wong Tai Sin, Tsuen Wan, Sha Tin, Aberdeen, and Mong Kok; additional demonstrations are likely to occur at other locations, especially at police stations and other government facilities. Violent incidents may escalate following reports that a protester was shot by an off-duty police officer.

Protesters have implemented roadblocks and set fire to MTR stations and mainland Chinese businesses at multiple locations. Some demonstrators have thrown Molotov cocktails at police and prevented first responders from putting out fires. Additional clashes between police and demonstrators are highly likely through at least early Oct. 5. Transport and business disruptions will likely continue throughout Hong Kong for the duration of the clashes.


 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to likely further clashes. Arrange alternative transport as necessary. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts nearby.
 


Oct. 4 | Warning Alert
Activists announce protests in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 4-7 amid invocation of Emergency Regulations Ordinance. Violence, disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 04 Oct 2019 11:24 GMT and is scheduled to expire 07 Oct 2019 19:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Oct. 4-7
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business disruptions

 

Summary

Protesters in Hong Kong have announced protests Oct. 4-7, amid heightened tensions after the government invoked the Emergency Regulations Ordinance and the shooting of a protester on Oct. 2. The government used the ordinance to issue a new regulation banning face mask during unapproved demonstrations; officials hope that the measure - which comes into effect Oct. 5 - will help stem rising violence in the country. The regulation will be subject to approval by the Legislative Council, which is slated to resume Oct. 16. As of the afternoon of Oct. 4, activists have announced the following protests:

  • Oct. 4: Demonstrators reportedly planning to gather at City Plaza in Tai Koo Shing from 2000
  • Oct. 4: Demonstrators reportedly planning to gather at V-Walk in Nam Shim Shui Po from 2000
  • Oct. 4: Protesters to rally at Temple Mall in Wong Tai Sin at 2000.
  • Oct. 4: Gathering possible at at New Town Plaza in Sha Tin
  • Oct. 4: Protesters may rally at Sha Tsui Road Playground in Tsuen Wan
  • Oct. 4: Rally to take place at TMT Plaza in Tuen Mun from 2000
  • Oct. 4: Activists to gather at Mega Mall in Taipo starting at 2000
  • Oct. 4: Protesters to rally at PopCorn mall in Tseung Kwan O
  • Oct. 4: Demonstration likely at Landmark North in Sheung Shui from 2000
  • Oct. 4: Rally slated to take place at Yoho mall from 2000
  • Oct. 5: Activists to gather at shopping centers in Kowloon New Territories for peaceful demonstrations from 1300
  • Oct. 5: Protesters to meet at SOGO in Causeway Bay at 1400 and march to Chater Garden against the anti-mask law
  • Oct. 5: Rally planned at Victoria Park 1900-2200
  • Oct. 6: Demonstration planned at Victoria Park from 1400 to demand investigation into police
  • Oct. 7: Secondary students likely to rally in several locations during planned strike
  • Oct. 7: Memorial ceremony to take place at Prince Edward MTR Station, 1900-2000

Additional unannounced protests are highly likely. Violence will probably occur at many locations; activists may erect roadblocks, start fires, throw projectiles - including petrol bombs - and vandalize property. Protesters usually target government and police buildings, and - increasingly - businesses that have expressed support for the government or Beijing.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters. In some instances, police have also fired warning shots with live ammunition. Fast-moving clashes are likely in areas where future demonstrations take place. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes. Activists also frequently target Mass Transit Railway (MTR) stations prompting preemptive closures and rail disruptions.


 

Background and Analysis

The invocation of the Emergency Regulations Ordinance is likely to spike calls for more demonstrations in the short term. The colonial-era law is unpopular with most activist and civil liberty groups, who fear it will allow the government to crack down on freedom of speech and other rights in the territory. However, the government has stated several times that the ordinance and so-called face mask ban is intended only to "end violence" and "restore order" in the region, which has experienced nearly four months of unrest.

 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or organizing early-release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Oct. 2 | Warning Alert
Protests over political reform, police investigation to continue in Hong Kong, China, as of Oct. 2. Localized disruptions, clashes likely.

 

Click to enlarge Google Map.

This alert began 02 Oct 2019 10:03 GMT and is scheduled to expire 15 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Protesters in Hong Kong have vowed to continue their demonstrations as of Oct. 2, after widespread clashes took place throughout the territory on China's Oct. 1 National Day. A police officer shot a demonstrator, reportedly in self-defense, during clashes, and the incident will likely fuel further disruptive protests in the coming weeks. Though Chief Executive Carrie Lam has already announced that her government would officially withdraw controversial amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance when the Legislative Council resumes, activists continue to demand an independent investigation into police conduct during months of unrest and progress on political reforms, among other demands. However, the chief executive has not indicated she is willing to meet any other demands, suggesting protests could continue indefinitely.

Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts will likely occur at well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. However, unannounced protests are highly likely and could be disruptive. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in the central business areas of Hong Kong Island such as Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay; popular tourist areas in Kowloon; and population centers in New Territories. Activists have also frequently targeted police stations in the territory. Police have banned many recent protests due to security concerns, but activists have often defied the orders.

Various student groups launched an indefinite class boycott in support of the protest movement in early September. Participants plan to continue demonstrations in front of various educational institutions. Though the frequency of gatherings has declined, dozens of protesters could continue to participate in protests, though some events may draw a higher turnout.

Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups also stage rallies in support of police and the government. While most gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible and could draw thousands of participants. Clashes between rival groups have increased in recent weeks and fighting between opposing activists is likely to continue. Reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between police and protesters are especially likely at unannounced rallies and near police stations and government offices. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters, while some protesters have started fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, during recent confrontations.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Oct. 2, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Protesters are likely to continue targeting Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations and stations. MTR officials have also increasingly preemptively shut down stations to avoid vandalism and violence. Activists have gathered outside MTR stations to protest the company's station shutdowns during recent protests, and similar actions are possible in the coming weeks. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines, causing disruptions of up to several hours.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Activists have damaged traffic signals near protests and sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous actions in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protests aimed at disrupting operations and transport to HKG remain possible. Activists have called for several "stress tests" of ground transport to the airport in recent weeks, though participation is difficult to predict. While protesters severely disrupted transport to HKG, Sept. 1, other stress tests have failed to cause significant transport delays. Protesters have also demonstrated at the airport, triggering flight disruptions. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights Aug. 13 as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued an injunction against protests outside designated areas, but further demonstrations at HKG could occur.


 

Background and Analysis

Unrest is likely to continue in the medium term in Hong Kong. Despite Lam's declaration that she would formally withdraw the bill that initially prompted protests, allegations of police abuse and neglect have partially fueled protests and violence in recent weeks. The public will probably continue to support the protests until the government announces an independent commission to investigate the unrest. The government continues to propose that the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) carry out the investigation and have included foreign representatives to support the group's work. The government has also failed to address the activists' other demands, especially calls for universal suffrage, and maintains that reform discussions will not occur until violence in the territory ends.

 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.


Oct. 1 | Warning Alert
Activists call for general strike in Hong Kong, China, Oct. 2. Business and transportation disruptions likely. Avoid demonstrations.

 

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This alert began 01 Oct 2019 19:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 02 Oct 2019 22:00 GMT.

  • Incident: General strike
  • Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 
  • Date: Oct. 2
  • Impact: Heightened security; business and transport disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Student activist groups have called for a general strike in Hong Kong on Oct. 2. Organizers have called the strike to condemn the Hong Kong Police Force for shooting and injuring a protester during clashes Oct. 1. Support for the strike may be high; significant participation is particularly likely in the educational sector.

Strike supporters are likely to hold impromptu rallies at locations throughout Hong Kong. Protesters are likely to engage in roadblocks and marches. Groups of demonstrators may attempt to set fires at Mass Transit Railway (MTR) facilities and on other government property. Likely protest venues include areas near school campuses, MTR stations, police stations, and other government facilities.

Authorities will deploy security personnel near the rally locations. Clashes between police and protesters are likely. Violent confrontations between rival groups are also possible, especially if protesters gather in pro-establishment neighborhoods.

The strike and protests may prompt widespread business disruptions. Traffic and commercial disruptions are highly likely near all protest venues; generalized disruptions to transport services could also occur. Authorities may suspend operations at MTR facilities as a precautionary measure. Depending on the extent of strike participation, interruptions to nonessential government services may also occur.


 

Advice

Confirm appointments and transport reservations in Hong Kong on Oct. 2. Make allowances for possible business disruptions. Consider work from home or early release arrangements. Allow extra time for ground transportation. Avoid protest sites as a precaution due to the threat of localized clashes. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, non-governmental building if violence erupts.

 


Oct. 1 | Warning Alert 
Violent protests occurring in several areas of Hong Kong, China, Oct. 1. Additional clashes likely. Avoid all demonstrations.

 

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This alert began 01 Oct 2019 11:27 GMT and is scheduled to expire 02 Oct 2019 05:00 GMT.

  • Incident: National Day protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Date: Oct. 1
  • Impact: Heightened security; ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible flight disruptions

 

Summary

Protesters demanding an independent investigation into police conduct during months of unrest and progress on political reforms, among other demands, are demonstrating in several parts of Hong Kong as of the evening of Oct. 1. Active clashes between police and protesters have occurred in Sham Shui Po, Tsuen Wan, Wong Tai Sin, Tuen Mun, Yau Ma Tei, Mong Kok, Wan Chai, and Causeway Bay as of 1900. Reports indicate that activists have blocked roads and burned debris in several locations, thrown petrol bombs, and vandalized some buildings and Mass Transit Railway (MTR) stations.

Authorities have fired tear gas and used water cannon during the demonstrations. Officials have confirmed that police have fired at least five live rounds as warning shots. A police officer shot a protester on Hoi Pa Street in Tsuen Wan; the wounded student remains in critical condition. Clashes will continue through at least early Oct. 2.

MTR authorities have closed 28 MTR stations due to the unrest and halted service on the Tsuen Wan line. Light rail disruptions are also reportedly occurring. Additional station closures and rail disruptions are likely through at least the morning of Oct. 2.


 

Advice

Consider sheltering in place if in areas where violent unrest is occurring. Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Confirm the availability of transport; allow additional time to reach destinations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Sept. 30 | Warning Alert
Activists announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, for National Day Oct. 1. Tight security, transport disruptions likely.

 

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This alert began 30 Sep 2019 08:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: National Day protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Date: Oct. 1
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible flight disruptions

 

 

Summary

Hong Kong will observe National Day as a public holiday Oct. 1. An official event marking the holiday will take place at the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, where officials and dignitaries will watch a flag-raising ceremony indoors, during the morning. However, the government has canceled other high-profile celebrations due to security concerns.

Students, civic groups, and pro-democracy proponents have announced further demonstrations for National Day, Oct. 1, amid ongoing calls for an independent investigation into police conduct during months of unrest and progress on political reforms, among other demands. Authorities have not approved a previously planned Civil Human Rights Front mass march from Victoria Park to Chater Road. However, some activists may still attempt to carry out the march. Regardless, demonstrations are slated to take place throughout Hong Kong. Due to the symbolic importance of the day, hundreds of thousands of protesters could take part in protests. Activists have called on all residents to wear black and announced the following actions for Oct. 1:

  • 0700-0830: National Day Carnival to take place at Avenue of Stars in Kowloon.
  • 1100: Protesters to target The Hong Kong Jockey Club Sha Tin racecourse.
  • 1200-1400: Rally to take place at British Consulate General.
  • 1300: Protesters to gather at Sha Tsui Road Playground in Tsuen Wan before marching nearby.
  • 1300: Demonstrators to gather at Sha Tin Che Kung Temple before marching nearby.
  • 1300: Activists planning to meet at the Maple Street Playground in Sham Shui Po before marching to Mong Kong and later to Tsim Sha Tsui.
  • 1300: Protesters intend to gather at Wong Tai Sin Square before marching to Mong Kong and later to Tsim Sha Tsui.
  • 1300: Demonstrators to gather at Southorn Playground in Wan Chai before marching nearby.
  • 1300-2359: Activists plan to "stress test" ground transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG).
  • 1400-2200: Gathering possible at Victoria Park for canceled Civil Human Rights Front event; march to Chater Road could take place.
  • 1430-1730: Demonstration to take place at Xiqu Centre in Tsim Sha Tsui.
  • 2000-2200: Candlelight vigil for injured protesters to take place at the Victoria Harbour.
  • 2100: Protesters to gather at Landmark North in Sheung Shui.

Additional unannounced protests are highly likely Oct. 1. Activists could target police stations, government buildings, and ground transport during demonstrations; protesters could vandalize or destroy property at these locations. Roadblocks are also likely, including on major thoroughfares; protesters could start fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, to prevent security personnel from lifting blockades.

Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups will likely also hold rallies for the holiday. Hundreds to several thousand people could participate in these gatherings. The potential for clashes between rival groups is high, mainly if they gather in proximity.

Extremely tight security is likely in Hong Kong for National Day, especially near the Hong Kong Convention and Exhibition Centre, transport hubs, and HKG. Police could block roads to facilitate events or to prevent unauthorized demonstrations from taking place. Police will likely attempt to disperse any unauthorized protests that occur; officers will probably use tear gas and water cannon during encounters; rubber bullets and live fire cannot be ruled out. Violent clashes are likely.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Sept. 26 | Warning Alert 
Activists announce further actions in Hong Kong, China, through Sept. 30. Localized disruptions, clashes likely. Avoid protests.

 

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This alert began 26 Sep 2019 15:20 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Time Frame: Through Sept. 30
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Protesters in Hong Kong have announced additional actions through the end of September to press the government to allow an independent investigation into police conduct during months of unrest and progress on political reforms, among other demands. Chief Executive Carrie Lam has already announced that her government would officially withdraw controversial amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance when the Legislative Council resumes in mid-October. However, the chief executive has not indicated she is willing to meet any other demands, suggesting protests could continue indefinitely.

Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts will likely occur at well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. Police have banned many recent protests due to security concerns, but activists have defied the orders. As of Sept. 26, activists have proposed the following events:

  • Sept. 27: Student groups plan to gather at Victoria Park 1600-1800. Police approval pending.
  • Sept. 27: Students to hold a concert at Festival Walk in Kowloon Tong, 1730-1930.
  • Sept. 27: Protesters to gather at Edinburgh Place 1930-2330. Police permission granted.
  • Sept. 28: Activists to attempt "stress test" of ground transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) from 1300.
  • Sept. 28: Protesters to gather several locations from Victoria Park to Admiralty to form a human chain 1600-1930.
  • Sept. 28: Demonstrators to gather at Kwai Chung Plaza 1800-2200 to mark the fifth anniversary of the Umbrella Movement.
  • Sept. 28: Civil Human Rights Front to hold a mass rally at Tamar Park in Admiralty 1900-2100 to mark the fifth anniversary of the Umbrella Movement. Police permission granted.
  • Sept. 29: Protesters to gather at Festival Walk 1300-2230.
  • Sept. 29: Students to rally at Tsuen Wan Park 1430-1900.
  • Sept. 29: Activists to gather at SOGO at 1430 and hold an anti-China march to Hong Kong Central Government Complex from 1500. Protests likely in other areas.
  • Sept. 30: General strike called across the territory; participation unclear. Protests likely.
  • Sept. 30: Demonstrators to form a human chain at Hong Kong Clock Tower in Tsim Sha Tsui 1930-2200.

Various student groups launched an indefinite class boycott in support of the protest movement in early September. Participants plan to continue demonstrations in front of various educational institutions. Dozens of protesters are likely to gather for the protests, though some events may draw a higher turnout.

Additional unannounced protests are likely. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in the central business areas of Hong Kong Island, including Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Activists have also frequently targeted police stations in the territory.

Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups also stage rallies in support of police and the government. While most gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible and could draw thousands of participants. Clashes between rival groups have increased in recent weeks and fighting between opposing activists is likely to continue. Reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between police and protesters are especially likely at unannounced rallies and near police stations and government offices. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters, while some protesters have started fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, during recent confrontations.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Sept. 20, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Protesters are likely to continue targeting Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations and stations. Activists have gathered outside MTR stations to protest the company's station shutdowns during recent protests. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines, causing disruptions of up to several hours. Additional disruptive protests on MTR lines are possible in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Activists have damaged traffic signals near protests and sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous protests in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protests aimed at disrupting operations at and transport to HKG could continue. Activists have called for several "stress tests" of ground transport to the airport in recent weeks, though participation is difficult to predict. While protesters severely disrupted transport to HKG, Sept. 1, other stress tests have failed to cause significant transport delays. Protesters have also demonstrated at the airport, triggering flight disruptions. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights Aug. 13 as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside designated areas, but further demonstrations at HKG remain possible.


 

Background and Analysis

Unrest continues in Hong Kong, despite Lam's declaration that she would formally withdraw the bill that initially prompted protests in Hong Kong. Allegations of police abuse and neglect have partially fueled protests and violence in recent weeks, and the public will probably continue to support the protests until the government announces an independent commission to investigate the unrest. The government continues to propose that the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) carry out the investigation and has included foreign representatives to support the group's work. The government has also failed to address the activists' other demands, especially calls for universal suffrage, and maintains that reform discussions will not occur until violence in the territory ends.

 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Sept. 25 | Warning Alert 
Officials close Sha Tin MTR station in Hong Kong, China, following clashes between police and protesters late Sept. 25. Avoid the area.

Click to enlarge Google Map.

This alert began 25 Sep 2019 14:57 GMT and is scheduled to expire 25 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protest
  • Location: Sha Tin, Hong Kong 
  • Start Date: Late Sept. 25
  • Impact: Heightened security, transport disruptions, further clashes

 

Summary

Officials have closed Sha Tin MTR station from late Sept. 25 following confrontations between protesters and police at the facility. Spontaneous protests began at the station after MTR staff detained a person for allegedly refusing to pay a fare. Hundreds of demonstrators and dozens of police gathered at the scene; clashes between police and protesters have occurred.

Increased security measures and transport disruptions are likely at and near Sha Tin station through at least early Sept. 26. Additional clashes are possible in the area.


 

Advice

Avoid the Sha Tin MTR station due to possible further clashes. Make allowances for localized transport and business disruptions.


Sept. 25 | Warning Alert 
Protests possible in Hong Kong, China, during government's first Community Dialogue meeting at Queen Elizabeth Stadium, 1900-2100 Sept. 26.

 

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This alert began 25 Sep 2019 09:18 GMT and is scheduled to expire 26 Sep 2019 18:00 GMT.

  • Event: Community Dialogue
  • Location: Queen Elizabeth Stadium, Wan Chai 
  • Time Frame: 1900-2100 Sept. 26
  • Impact: Increased security, ground transport disruptions; possible clashes

Summary
Hong Kong Chief Executive Carrie Lam will hold a Community Dialogue event the evening of Sept. 26. The meeting, the government's attempt at addressing months of political unrest, will take place at Queen Elizabeth Stadium in Wan Chai, 1900-2100. Activists opposed to the government could hold demonstrations during the event; several hundred to a few thousand people could participate in any protest that emerges.

Extremely tight security is likely for the meeting. Police will probably block nearby roads as a precaution. Localized transport disruptions could occur. Clashes between police and protesters may take place, particularly if activists attempt to bypass security measures near the stadium.

Advice
Avoid the event site due to security measures and the potential for clashes. Use alternative routes to avoid the area. Allow additional time to reach nearby destinations.

 


Sept. 20 | Warning Alert
Activists to continue demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, as of Sept. 20. Events planned through at least Oct. 1. Avoid protests.

 

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This alert began 20 Sep 2019 08:13 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Protesters will continue to hold demonstrations in Hong Kong to call for an independent investigation into police conduct during months of unrest and progress on political reforms, among other demands. Chief Executive Carrie Lam has already announced that her government would officially withdraw controversial amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance when the Legislative Council resumes in mid-October. However, the government has not suggested it is willing to meet any other demands, suggesting protests could continue indefinitely. Demonstrations are likely to increase in frequency in the lead up to and during China's Oct. 1 National Day.

Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts will likely occur at well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. Police have banned many recent protests due to security concerns, but activists have defied the orders, leading to clashes. As of Sept. 20, activists have proposed the following events:

  • Sept. 20: Police have approved a rally at Chater Garden, 1730-1930.
  • Sept. 20: Students to form a human chain at Tsuen Wan Ferry Pier beginning at 1800.
  • Sept. 20: Activists plan to gather at various locations in Taikoo Shing.
  • Sept. 21: Government supporters could gather at Lennon Walls throughout the city to "clean" Hong Kong. Clashes between rival groups possible.
  • Sept. 21: Stress test of transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) possible from 1300.
  • Sept. 21: Protesters to gather at San Wo Lane and march to Tuen Mun Government Offices, 1400-1700.
  • Sept. 21: Sit-in planned at Yuen Long MTR Station from 1900 to mark the two-month anniversary of violent clashes at the location.
  • Sept. 22: Christian groups to form a human chain at Ma Tau Wai Road Playground, 0845-0930.
  • Sept. 22: Events slated to take place at New Town Plaza and Citylink in Sha Tin, 1200-1600.
  • Sept. 22: Activists plan to target transport throughout Hong Kong; MTR and traffic disruptions likely.
  • Sept. 23: Students to gather outside campuses after school hours.
  • Sept. 24: Activists to rally at Landmark North, 2100-2200.
  • Sept. 26: Protests possible in Wan Chai during government's first Community Dialogue meeting at Queen Elizabeth Stadium, 1900-2100.
  • Sept. 27: Rally planned at Chater Garden, 2000-2330; police approval pending.
  • Sept. 28: Stress test of transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) possible from 1300.
  • Sept. 29: Anti-China rallies planned territory-wide.

Various student groups launched an indefinite class boycott in support of the protest movement in early September. Participants plan to continue demonstrations in front of various educational institutions. Dozens of protesters are likely to gather for the protests, though some events may draw a higher turnout.

Additional unannounced protests are likely in the coming weeks. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in the central business areas of Hong Kong Island, including Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups will likely continue to stage rallies in support of police and the government. While most gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible and could draw thousands of participants.

Activists have increasingly targeted police stations in the territory. Clashes between police and protesters are especially likely at unannounced rallies and near police stations and government offices. Police will likely use tear gas and water cannon during encounters, while some protesters have started fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, during recent confrontations.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups have increased in recent weeks, and fighting between opposing activists is likely to continue. Reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters. The highest possibility of violence between rival groups is in the New Territories, where many areas have historically strong ties to mainland China, but skirmishes could occur elsewhere.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Sept. 20, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Protesters are likely to continue targeting Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations and stations. Activists have gathered outside MTR stations to protest the company's station shutdowns during recent protests. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines, causing disruptions of up to several hours. Additional disruptive protests on MTR lines are possible in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near demonstrations. Activists have damaged traffic signals near protests and sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous protests in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protesters aimed at disrupting operations at and transport to HKG could continue. Activists have called for several "stress tests" of ground transport to the airport in recent weeks, though participation is difficult to predict. While protesters severely disrupted transport to HKG, Sept. 1, other stress tests have failed to cause significant transport delays. Protesters have also demonstrated at the airport, triggering flight disruptions. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights Aug. 13 as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside designated areas, but further demonstrations at HKG remain possible.


 

Background and Analysis

Unrest continues in Hong Kong, despite Lam's declaration that she would formally withdraw the bill that initially prompted protests in Hong Kong. Allegations of police abuse and neglect have partially fueled protests and violence in recent weeks, and the public will probably continue to support the protests until the government announces an independent commission to investigate the unrest. The government continues to propose that the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) carry out the investigation and has included foreign representatives to support the group's work. The government has also failed to address the activists' other demands, especially calls for universal suffrage, and maintains that reform discussions will not occur until violence in the territory ends.

The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office - the mainland Chinese government body responsible for Hong Kong - has continued to support Lam and the police. The People's Armed Police (PAP) has reportedly deployed to Shenzhen, but the likelihood of intervention by security forces from mainland China remains low. Officials in both Beijing and Hong Kong continue to state that police can manage the demonstrations. Recent reports suggest the government could invoke the Emergency Regulations Ordinance, which would provide authorities with sweeping powers to end the unrest. Local media accounts citing officials suggest the law- if invoked - may be used to ban demonstrations near critical infrastructure. Despite the speculation, it is unclear if the government is willing to take the step, which could be debated or repealed by the Legislative Council.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Sept. 12 | Warning Alert
Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Sept. 14 and 21. Disruptions, clashes possible.

 

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This alert began 13 Sep 2019 15:00 GMT and is scheduled to expire 21 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: 1300-2359 Sept. 14 and 21
  • Impact: Heightened security; possible ground transport delays, flight disruptions, and clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the government's response to recent protests plan to overwhelm ground transportation near Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) Sept. 14 and 21. Participants intend to impose a "stress test" on roads, pedestrian paths, and other transportation to the airport from 1300 on both days. Activists are especially likely to target Mass Transit Railway (MTR) services to the airport. Authorities have banned protests within HKG terminals and have stepped up security screenings at the facility, but activists may attempt to gather inside the airport itself. Hundreds to thousands of people may participate in the planned protests and transport disruptions.

The planned actions on Sept. 14 and 21 could cause ground transport disruptions in areas near the airport and on MTR lines to the facility. Flight delays and cancellations are possible. A similar action scheduled for Aug. 24 did not prompt major ground transport or flight disruptions at HKG; however, protesters did prompt brief disruptions at the facility on Sept. 1.

Authorities will maintain additional security measures at and near HKG ahead of the planned protests. An increased police presence is also possible at MTR and bus stations to prevent the planned actions. Although organizers have specifically called for peaceful demonstrations, clashes between police and demonstrators are possible.


 

Advice
 

Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules at HKG, Sept. 14 and 21. Confirm ground transport reservations and make alternative arrangements as necessary. Allow significant extra time to arrive at the airport and clear security for departing flights during the announced protest time frames. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at HKG. Immediately leave the area if clashes occur.

 


Sept. 6 | Warning Alert
Activists to hold several demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 6-8. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

 

This alert began 06 Sep 2019 07:35 GMT and is scheduled to expire 08 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Time Frame: Sept. 6-8
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport and business disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Activists plan to hold several demonstrations in Hong Kong, Sept. 6-8, to press their demands and condemn alleged police brutality during ongoing protests. Protesters have called for the following actions:

  • Sept. 6: Demonstration possible at APM Millenium City 5 1830-2130; participation unclear.
  • Sept. 6: Protesters calling for demonstrations at MTR stations from 1900 to condemn clashes at Prince Edward MTR Station, Aug. 31. Large gatherings possible Prince Edward and other prominent MTR stations.
  • Sept. 6: Police-approved rally to take place at Chater Garden 1930-2359.
  • Sept. 6: Possible gathering at Aberdeen Promenade at 2000; participation unclear.
  • Sept. 7: Demonstrators to conduct stress test of ground transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) starting at 1300.
  • Sept. 7: Activists have proposed a demonstration at Government House; large turnout possible.
  • Sept. 8: Activists to gather at Chater Garden at 1200 and march to US Consulate General for a rally at 1400.

Thousands of people could participate in events planned through Sept. 8, especially the march to the US Consulate General.

A significant police presence is likely at all demonstrations. Clashes between police and protesters are likely, especially at unapproved events. More radical activists may erect roadblocks or protest in unauthorized areas. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which may trigger clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely during mass protests. Access to MTR stations may be limited during protests, especially during planned demonstrations Sept. 6. Authorities often alter MTR operations during mass events, and trains could bypass stations in the affected neighborhoods. Localized traffic congestion is likely if marches take place.


 

Advice

Avoid announced events and other prominent protest locations due to the likelihood of violence. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions through Sept. 8. Consider alternative transport due to likely MTR disruptions. Follow all police instructions.

 


Sept. 5 | Warning Alert
Protests likely to continue in Hong Kong, China, despite withdraw of controversial bill. Events announced through Sept. 21.

 

This alert began 05 Sep 2019 15:51 GMT and is scheduled to expire 21 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Activists are likely to continue ongoing protests in Hong Kong, despite Chief Executive Carrie Lam announcing that her government would officially withdraw controversial amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance when the Legislative Council resumes. Initial statements from pro-democracy groups and politicians and activists indicate that the move has failed to appease many protesters. Demonstrators continue to demand the government establish an independent commission to investigate police violence and move on political reforms, among other demands. Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts will likely occur at well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. Police have banned many recent protests due to security concerns, but activists have defied the orders, leading to clashes. As of Sept. 5, activists have proposed the following events:

  • Sept. 7 Activists plan stress test for transport to Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) from 1300.
  • Sept. 8: Protesters to gather at Edinburgh Place at 1400 and march to the US Consulate General to press for the Hong Kong Human Rights and Democracy Act.
  • Sept. 10: Protest likely at Hong Kong Stadium during Hong Kong vs Iran World Cup qualifying match at 2000.
  • Sept. 14: March from Tin Sau Road Park to Tin Shui Wai Station from 1430.
  • Sept. 14: Students to protest at Temple Mall from 1600.
  • Sept. 16: Rally planned at Wanchai Revenue Tower at 1200.
  • Sept. 21: Sit-in to take place at Yuen Long Station 1900-2300.

Various student groups launched an indefinite class boycott in support of the protest movement in early September. Participants plan to continue demonstrations in front of various educational institutions. Dozens of protesters are likely to gather for the demonstrations. Students have threatened to intensify their campaign if the government does not meet their demands by Sept. 13.

Additional unannounced protests are likely in the coming weeks. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in the central business areas of Hong Kong Island, such as Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Activists have increasingly targeted police stations in the territory. Clashes between police and protesters are especially likely at unannounced rallies near police stations; officers will likely use tear gas and water cannon, while some protesters have started fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, during recent confrontations.

Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups will likely stage rallies in support of police and the government. While most such gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible; tens of thousands of people marched in the city July 20 in support of police.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups are also likely; reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters. The highest possibility of fighting between rival groups is in the New Territories, where many areas have historically strong ties to mainland China, but skirmishes could occur elsewhere.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Sept. 5, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Protesters are likely to continue targeting Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations and stations. Activists have gathered outside MTR stations in recent days to protest the company's station shutdowns during recent protests. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines. MTR service disruptions of up to several hours could occur during protests. Additional disruptive protests on MTR lines are possible in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near both announced and unannounced rallies. Activists have damaged traffic signals near protests and sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous demonstrations in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protesters aimed at disrupting operations at and transport to HKG could continue. Activists have called for several "stress tests" of ground transport to the airport in recent weeks, though participation is difficult to predict. While protesters severely disrupted transport to HKG, Sept. 1, other stress tests have failed to cause significant transport delays. Protesters have also demonstrated at the airport, triggering flight disruptions. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights Aug. 13 as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside designated areas, but further demonstrations at HKG are possible.


 

Background and Analysis

Though Lam has withdrawn the legislation that initially prompted protests in Hong Kong, her latest statements are unlikely to satisfy many moderate and hardline activists. Allegations of police abuse and neglect have partially fueled protests and violence in recent weeks, and the public will probably continue to support the protests until the government announced an independent commission to investigate the unrest. The government continues to propose that the Independent Police Complaints Council (IPCC) carry out the investigation and has included foreign representatives to support the group's work. The government has also failed to address the activists' other demands adequately, especially calls for universal suffrage; however, Lam reiterated that such discussions could not occur until violence in the territory ended.

The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office - the mainland Chinese government body responsible for Hong Kong - has continued to support Lam and the police. State media in China have increased their rhetoric against the actions in recent weeks, prompting concern that authorities could intensify their response to the protests. The People's Armed Police (PAP) have also reportedly deployed to Shenzhen, but the likelihood of intervention by security forces from mainland China remains low. Officials in both Beijing and Hong Kong continue to state that Hong Kong police can manage the demonstrations. Recent reports suggest the government could invoke the Emergency Regulations Ordinance, which would provide authorities with sweeping powers to end the unrest; however, local media accounts citing officials suggest the law- if invoked - may be used to ban demonstrations near critical infrastructure.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Sept. 3 | Warning Alert
Activists plan protests in Hong Kong, China, through at least Sept. 14. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

This alert began 03 Sep 2019 21:05 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Sep 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Activists have announced additional protests in Hong Kong to press the government to formally withdraw a bill amending the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, establish an independent commission to investigate police violence and move on political reforms, among other demands. The protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts will likely occur at well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. Police have banned some protests due to security concerns, but activists have defied the orders, leading to clashes.

As of Sept. 4, activists have announced the following events:

  • Sept. 8: Gathering for human rights in front of the US consulate, from 1400
  • Sept. 14: Student protest at Temple Mall, from 1600

Various student groups launched an indefinite class boycott in support of the protest movement in early September. Participants plan to continue demonstrations in front of various educational institutions. Dozens of protesters are likely to gather for the demonstrations.

Additional unannounced protests are likely in the coming weeks. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in the central business areas of Hong Kong Island, such as Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Activists have increasingly targeted police stations in the territory. Clashes between police and protesters are especially likely at unannounced rallies near police stations; officers will likely use tear gas and water cannon, while some protesters have set fires and thrown projectiles, including petrol bombs, during recent confrontations.

Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups will likely stage rallies in support of police and the government. While most such gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible; tens of thousands of people marched in the city July 20 in support of police.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel to both announced and impromptu protest locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups are also likely; reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters. The highest risk of fighting between rival groups is in the New Territories, where many areas have historically strong ties to mainland China, but skirmishes could occur elsewhere.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Sept. 4, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Protesters plan to target Mass Transit Railway (MTR) sporadically through at least Sept. 6. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines. MTR service disruptions of up to several hours could occur during protests. Additional disruptive protests on MTR lines are possible in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are likely to continue near both announced and unannounced rallies. Activists damaged traffic signals during an Aug. 5 action and have sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous demonstrations in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions may occur if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protesters gathered at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), Aug. 9-13. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights Aug. 13 as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside designated areas. Airport operations have normalized, but further demonstrations are possible in the coming weeks.


 

Background and Analysis

While the government has suspended the extradition law amendments, Chief Executive Carrie Lam has not formally withdrawn the bill. Her government has also failed to meet other protester demands, notably the creation of an independent commission to investigate clashes between protesters and police, the release of arrested activists, and her resignation as chief executive. The extradition bill has become a lightning rod for discontent among some segments of Hong Kong society that believe Beijing's influence is eroding the territory's freedoms. The government maintains the reforms are necessary to close loopholes in Hong Kong's existing extradition treaties and to prevent the city from serving as a haven for mainland Chinese criminals. Opponents of the proposed changes to the extradition law fear the amendments would allow human rights abuses and undermine Hong Kong's judicial system.

The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office - the mainland Chinese government body responsible for Hong Kong - has continued to support Lam and the police fully. State media in China have increased their rhetoric against the actions in recent weeks, prompting concern that authorities could intensify their response to the protests. The People's Armed Police (PAP) have also reportedly deployed to Shenzhen, but the likelihood of intervention by security forces from mainland China remains low. Officials in both Beijing and Hong Kong continue to state that Hong Kong police are capable of managing the demonstrations. Hong Kong officials could seek to ban large protests temporarily, effectively making rallies illegal. Police are also reportedly testing water cannon and ink, as police have been unable to identify and arrest many activists during the demonstrations. Distrust in the government and police is high among demonstrators, and a police crackdown or particularly violent clashes could precipitate more mass rallies and marches. Meanwhile, disruptive and occasionally violent tactics during recent confrontations, particularly at HKG and during unannounced rallies, could alienate some former supporters of the protest movement. The government's apparent inflexibility toward protester demands, and the perceived radicalization of elements of the protest movement indicate that demonstrations and clashes are highly likely to continue in the coming weeks.


 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Aug. 30 | Warning Alert
Activists likely to protest, march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 31, despite police ban. Tight security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

This alert began 30 Aug 2019 08:55 GMT and is scheduled to expire 31 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Date: Aug. 31
  • Impact: Increased security, localized ground transport delays, clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the government's response to recent protests are likely to continue plans to protest Aug. 31 despite a police ban. Officials did not provide permission for the event, organized by the Civil Human Rights Front (CHRF), due to security concerns. CHRF called off its planned protest march from Chater Garden to the Liaison Office of the Central People's Government, after authorities denied their appeal to hold the event. While the police ban could dissuade widespread participation in the event, thousands of people could attempt to carry out the march.

Demonstrations could also occur in other parts of Hong Kong Island, especially popular protest sites such as Chater Garden, Victoria Park, and the Legislative Council Complex. Protesters could also gather in Kowloon, including Mong Kok and Tsim Sha Tsui, and the New Territories.

A significant police presence is likely in probable protest areas, Aug. 31. Clashes between police and protesters are likely. More radical activists may erect roadblocks, throw rocks and petrol bombs at police, and vandalize property. Police often respond to unauthorized protests with pepper spray, tear gas, and rubber or bean bag rounds. Authorities used water cannon during demonstrations Aug. 25 and could deploy them again if mass demonstrations occur. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which may trigger clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely if protests occur. Activists could seek to block main roads and highways in the city, prompting traffic and bus service disruptions. MTR may cut service and close stations in areas where violence is occurring.


 

Background and Analysis

The CHRF demonstration was set to mark the so-called 831 decision, in which Beijing officials stated that any candidate for Chief Executive must "love the country and love Hong Kong." The decision angered pro-democracy activists and eventually led to the Umbrella Movement, which sought to allow free selection of candidates and "true" universal suffrage. The ban also follows the arrest of prominent pro-democracy and political activists the morning of Aug. 30. The ban on the CHRF event and arrests could further anger protesters and prompt a large turnout for demonstrations Aug. 31.

 

Advice

likely protest sites Aug. 31 due to the high probability of violence. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building away from protesters if fighting erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions Aug. 31. Consider alternative transport due to likely MTR disruptions. Follow all police instructions.

 


Aug. 29 | Warning Alert
Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Sept. 1-2. Flight disruptions, clashes possible.

This alert began 31 Aug 2019 23:00 GMT and is scheduled to expire 02 Sep 2019 18:00 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport
  • Time Frame: Sept. 1-2
  • Impact: Increased security; possible ground transport delays, flight disruptions, and clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the government's response to recent protests plan to overwhelm ground transportation near Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) Sept. 1-2. Participants intend to impose a "stress test" on roads, pedestrian paths, and other transportation near the airport from 1300 Sept. 1. Although authorities have banned protests within the terminals of HKG and have stepped up security screenings at the facility, activists may attempt to gather inside the airport itself. Hundreds to thousands of people may participate in the planned protests and transport disruptions.

A similar action scheduled on Aug. 24 did not prompt major ground transport or flight disruptions at HKG. Nevertheless, the Sept. 1-2 action could cause ground transport disruptions in areas near the airport. Flight delays and cancellations are possible.

Authorities will maintain additional security measures at and near HKG ahead of the planned protests. An increased police presence is also possible at MTR and bus stations to prevent the planned actions. Although organizers have specifically called for peaceful demonstrations, clashes between police and demonstrators are possible.


 

Advice

Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules at HKG, Sept 1-2. Confirm ground transport reservations and make alternative arrangements as necessary. Allow significant extra time to arrive at the airport and clear security for departing flights during the announced protest time frame. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at HKG. Immediately leave the area if clashes occur.
 


Aug. 29 | Warning Alert
Activists plan general strike, rallies in Hong Kong, China, Sept. 2-3. Business and transportation disruptions likely. Clashes possible.

This alert began 01 Sep 2019 00:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 03 Sep 2019 20:00 GMT.

  • Incident: General strike, protests
  • Location: Hong Kong Special Administrative Region 
  • Time Frame: Sept. 2-3
  • Impact: Heightened security; business and transport disruptions; possible clashes

 

Summary

Pro-democracy activists and labor groups have called for a general strike and mass rallies in Hong Kong Sept. 2-3. Strike organizers include unions representing workers in the aviation, medical, and logistics industries, among other sectors. Supporters intend to hold rallies at Tamar Park and Salisbury Garden from 1330 Sept. 3. Organizers also plan to rally at Chater Garden on Sept. 3. Protesters are demanding that the government formally withdraw a bill amending the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and establish an independent commission to investigate police violence, among other demands. Participation in the planned strike is likely to be significant; organizers claim that nearly 350,000 people participated in a similar labor action on Aug. 5.

The strike is likely to prompt business disruptions. Widespread disruptions to transport services, including ground transportation and flight operations at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), are possible Sept. 2-3. Depending on the extent of strike participation, interruptions to nonessential government services may occur.

Additional protests are possible at locations throughout Hong Kong during the strike. Authorities will deploy security personnel near the rally locations. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes; additional violence is possible at the Sept. 2-3 demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, enter government property, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups are also possible, especially if protesters gather in pro-establishment neighborhoods. Traffic and commercial disruptions are highly likely near all protest venues.


 

Advice

Confirm appointments and transport reservations in Hong Kong on Sept. 2-3. Make allowances for possible business disruptions. Consider work from home or early release arrangements. Allow extra time for ground transportation. Avoid protest sites as a precaution due to the threat of localized clashes. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.
 


Aug. 22 | Warning Alert
Activists plan to disrupt ground transportation to Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 24. Flight disruptions, clashes possible.

This alert began 23 Aug 2019 00:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 24 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protests and ground transport blockades
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport
  • Time Frame: 0700-2300 Aug. 24
  • Impact: Increased security; ground transport delays; possible flight disruptions and clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and the government's response to recent protests plan to disrupt ground transportation to and from Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), Aug. 24. Participants intend to overwhelm and disrupt Hong Kong's Mass Transit Railway (MTR), private car, pedestrian, and bus services to HKG from 0700-2300, with the specific aim of prompting flight delays and cancellations. Although authorities recently banned protests within the terminals of HKG and have stepped up security screenings at the facility, activists may also attempt to gather inside the airport itself. Thousands of people may participate in the planned transport blockades.

The action could prompt severe ground transport disruptions in areas near the airport. Flight delays and cancellations are possible.

Authorities will deploy additional security personnel to HKG ahead of the Aug. 24 protest blockades. An increased police presence is also possible at MTR and bus stations in order to prevent the planned actions. Clashes between police and demonstrators are likely.


 

Advice

Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules at HKG, Aug. 24. Confirm ground transport reservations and make alternative arrangements as necessary. Allow significant extra time to arrive at the airport and clear security for departing flights during the announced protest time frame. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at HKG. Immediately leave the area if clashes occur.
 


Aug. 22 | Warning Alert
Activists plan demonstrations in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 23-25. Increased security, transport disruptions, clashes likely.

This alert began 22 Aug 2019 11:50 GMT and is scheduled to expire 25 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong
  • Time Frame: Aug. 23-25
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport and business disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and police actions during ongoing protests intend to hold several demonstrations through Aug. 25. As of Aug. 22, the following actions have been proposed:

  • Aug. 23: Activists plan to form a human chain along the Island, Tsuen Wan, and Kwun Tong Mass Transit Railway (MTR) lines.
  • Aug. 23: Protesters to rally at Chater Garden 1730-2200.
  • Aug. 24: Demonstrators to gather at Junye Street Park Playground at 1300 and march to Kwun Tong Swimming Pool, 1330-1600.
  • Aug. 25: Activists to gather at South Kwai Fong Station at 1430 and march to Tsuen Wan Park from 1500.

Tens of thousands of people could participate in events planned Aug. 23-25.

A significant police presence is likely at all demonstrations. Although organizers have asked demonstrators to remain peaceful, clashes between police and protesters are likely, especially if officials do not approve the marches. More radical activists may erect roadblocks or protest in unauthorized areas. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which may trigger clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely during mass protests. Access to MTR stations may be limited during the Aug. 23 protest. Marches will almost certainly cause traffic congestion. Authorities often alter MTR operations during mass events, and trains could bypass stations in the affected neighborhoods.


 

Advice

Avoid announced events and other likely protest locations due to the likelihood of violence. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions Aug. 23-25. Consider alternative transport due to likely MTR disruptions. Follow all police instructions.


Aug. 20 | Informational Alert
WorldAware continues to monitor protest activity in Hong Kong.

 

WorldAware continues to monitor the protest activity in Hong Kong. While difficult to predict, there are several security triggers that we are watching for that could result in a more aggressive local law enforcement or government response. Those triggers include any significant loss of life (either pro-demonstration or government/law enforcement officials), looting, significant property damage or arson, and continued protest activities resulting in prolonged disruption of essential services. Should any of these triggers occur, the change in government and law enforcement response may occur swiftly and without further warning; this could also result in a denial of media coverage or commercial travel in and out of the region.

Organizations must determine their risk tolerance for continued operations in Hong Kong given the intelligence and media reporting available. Organizations should consider the delay of non-essential travel to the region and should be prepared to initiate a “no travel” order should the security situation deteriorate. Organizations should also consider the temporary proactive relocation of expat personnel in the region to a safe location.

In addition, WorldAware’s Global Assistance and Response team recommends:

  • Postponing travel to Hong Kong if the travel is not time-sensitive.
  • Establishing automatic safety check-in policies where applicable.
  • Determining a work-from-home order notification process.
  • Stockpiling 3-5 days’ worth of food and water in case shelter-in-place is required.
  • Planning multiple routes to-and-from destinations to avoid demonstrations.
  • Keeping extra cash-on-hand in case access to banks is restricted or banks are closed.
  • Establishing rally points in case individuals are separated from family or colleagues.
  • Carrying appropriate identification at all times and fully complying with security checkpoints and directions.
  • Complying with curfews should they be established.
  • Registering with your local Embassy or Consulate.

 


Aug. 16 | Warning Alert
Activists announce additional protests in Hong Kong, China, through Aug. 31. Transport and business disruptions, clashes likely.

This alert began 16 Aug 2019 07:50 GMT and is scheduled to expire 31 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Political protests
  • Location: Hong Kong 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport disruptions; likely clashes; possible business and flight disruptions

 

Summary

Activists have announced additional actions in Hong Kong to demand that the government formally withdraw a bill amending the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, establish an independent commission to investigate police violence, and move on political reforms. Protest leadership remains largely decentralized, but organizations and online activists continue to plan demonstrations that draw hundreds to tens of thousands of participants. The highest turnouts are likely for well-publicized marches, especially on weekends. 

Although unconfirmed, activists have proposed the following events through the end of August:

  • Aug. 16: Protesters to gather at Chater Garden 2000-2200 to call for international support. Police-approved event.
  • Aug. 17: Education professionals to gather at Chater Garden at 1100 and march to Government House.
  • Aug. 17: Demonstrators intend to gather at Hung Hom Harbour at 1530 and march to To Kwa Wan. Event banned.
  • Aug. 17: Protesters to meet at Chater Garden at 1830 and march to Government House.
  • Aug. 17: Rally slated to occur at Edinburgh Square 1930-2130.
  • Aug. 18: Civil Human Rights Front event planned at Victoria Park; march to Chater Road possible from 1500. Police have approved a rally at the park 1000-2300 but banned the march. Previously announced events called off.
  • Aug. 24: Activists to march in Kwun Tong from 1330.
  • Aug. 25: Demonstrations planned in Tsuen Wan and Kwai Tsing districts.
  • Aug. 31: Civil Human Rights Front has called for a mass march.

Unannounced protests are also likely to occur. Spontaneous rallies could take place throughout Hong Kong, especially in central business areas of Hong Kong Island, such as Admiralty, Central, Wan Chai, Causeway Bay, and popular tourist areas in Kowloon. Activists have increasingly targeted police stations in the territory. Chinese nationalist and pro-establishment groups occasionally hold demonstrations in support of police and the government. While most gatherings remain small, larger protests are possible; tens of thousands of people marched in the city July 20 in support of police.

The Confederation of Trade Unions (CTU), which helped execute a territory-wide general strike Aug. 5, has warned that the organization could arrange additional labor actions. CTU claims that nearly 350,000 people participated in the labor action. Tens of thousands of people rallied in Sha Tin, Tsuen Wan, Tuen Mun, Wong Tai Sin, Tai Po, Mong Kok, and Admiralty, resulting in widespread transport disruptions and clashes. Mass demonstrations are likely if further strikes take place.

Authorities will continue to deploy security personnel during demonstrations. Police have banned some recent protests due to security concerns; however, activists have defied the orders, leading to clashes. Many recent marches and rallies have devolved into clashes, and violence is likely during future demonstrations. Fighting is most likely to occur if demonstrators attempt to gather despite police objections, surround or enter government property or police stations, bypass security cordons, or linger beyond approved protest times. Clashes between rival groups are also likely; reports indicate that individuals with ties to organized criminal groups have sought conflict with protesters. The highest risk of fighting between rival groups is in the New Territories, where many areas have historically strong ties to mainland China, but skirmishes could occur elsewhere.

Several governments have issued or upgraded advisories warning citizens to exercise caution while in Hong Kong or to avoid unnecessary travel to the territory. As of Aug. 16, no countries have restricted travel to Hong Kong.


 

Transport

Demonstrators are increasingly targeting transport infrastructure, leading to recurrent transport disruptions. Protesters gathered at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), Aug. 9-13. Officials halted flights at the airport Aug. 12 and canceled departing flights 13, as protesters attempted to prevent passengers from reaching departure gates. A court has issued a temporary injunction against protests outside of designated areas; officials are allowing gatherings in two areas of the Arrivals Hall. Though airport operations have normalized, further demonstrations are possible; unconfirmed reports suggest demonstrators could seek to disrupt airport operations on Tuesday and Friday evenings in the coming weeks.

Ground transport disruptions are also likely to continue. Activists damaged traffic signals during the Aug. 5 strike and have sporadically blocked the Cross Harbour Tunnel during previous demonstrations in Kowloon. Localized transport disruptions are possible near demonstrations, depending on turnout and protest tactics; activists will probably erect roadblocks during some events, exacerbating delays. Business disruptions can also occur, usually if protesters block roads near offices or seek shelter in shopping centers and commercial buildings amid clashes.

Protesters will probably continue to target Mass Transit Railway (MTR) operations sporadically. Demonstrators have obstructed doors and repeatedly pressed emergency buttons on trains to interrupt service. Protesters are likely to target the Island and Tsuen Wan lines, though activists have halted service on most MTR lines. MTR service disruptions of up to several hours could occur during protests.


 

Background and Analysis

While the government has suspended the extradition law amendments, Chief Executive Carrie Lam has not formally withdrawn the bill. Her government has also failed to meet other protester demands, especially the creation of an independent commission to investigate clashes between protesters and police. The extradition law bill has become a lightning rod for discontent among some segments of Hong Kong society that believe that Beijing's influence is eroding the territory's freedoms. The government maintains the reforms are necessary to close loopholes in Hong Kong's existing extradition treaties and to prevent the city from acting as a haven for mainland Chinese criminals. Opponents of the proposed changes to the extradition law fear the amendments would allow human rights abuses and undermine Hong Kong's judicial system. The government's perceived inflexibility suggests that protests could continue for several more weeks.

Activists have also added Lam's resignation and democratic reforms to their demands, though either move is unlikely. The Hong Kong and Macau Affairs Office - the Chinese government body responsible for Hong Kong - has continued to support Lam and police fully. State media in China has increased its rhetoric against the actions in recent weeks, prompting concern that authorities could intensify their response to the protests. The People's Liberation Army (PLA) has also reportedly deployed to Shenzhen; however, the likelihood of military intervention remains low. Officials in both Beijing and Hong Kong continue to state that police are capable of managing the demonstrations. Hong Kong officials could seek to ban large protests temporarily, effectively making rallies illegal. Police are also reportedly testing water cannon and ink, as police have been unable to identify and arrest many activists during the demonstrations. Distrust in the government and police is high among regular demonstrators, and a police crackdown or particularly violent clashes could precipitate more mass rallies and marches.

 

Advice

Avoid all announced or proposed protest actions due to the potential for violence. Exercise caution near likely protest locations. Monitor local media for protest activity, as organizers may not announce plans in advance. Consider working from home or early release arrangements on days when large demonstrations are taking place. Confirm the availability of transport, as rail and traffic disruptions are possible; allow additional time to reach destinations. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions near demonstrations. Follow all police instructions. Do not attempt to photograph or take a video of demonstrations. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts.

 


Aug. 15 | Warning Alert
Activists call for mass march in Hong Kong, China, Aug. 18. Tight security, clashes, transport disruptions likely. Avoid the march route.

This alert began 18 Aug 2019 07:52 GMT and is scheduled to expire 18 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Mass march
  • Location: Hong Kong Island 
  • Start Time/Date: 1430 Aug. 18
  • Impact: Heightened security, ground transport and business disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

The Civil Human Rights Front has called for a mass march on Hong Kong Island, Aug. 18, against alleged police brutality during ongoing protests over amendments to the Fugitive Offenders Ordinance. Activists will also press protesters demands. The group plans to gather at Victoria Park at 1430 and march through the city to Chater Garden in Central from 1500. Police have not approved the event, but the demonstration could take place without official approval. Tens to hundreds of thousands of supporters are likely to participate in the event amid widespread criticism of the police response to protests in some instances.

A significant police presence is likely at Victoria Park and along the march route. Though organizers have asked protesters to remain peaceful, clashes between police and protesters are likely, especially if officials do not approve the march. More radical activists have attempted to erect roadblocks or protest in unauthorized areas during previous events organized by the alliance, usually after the main event ends, leading to violence. Activists supporting the government and police may hold counterprotests, which has the potential to spark clashes between rival groups.

Severe ground transport disruptions are likely in the Causeway Bay, Central, Wan Chai, and Admiralty areas of Hong Kong Island if the march takes place. The demonstration will almost certainly cause traffic congestion in areas along the march route. Mass Transit Rail (MTR) authorities often alter operations during mass events; trains could bypass stations in the affected neighborhoods.


 

Background and Analysis

The Civil Human Rights Front, an alliance of 50 democratic activists groups, has organized several rallies that have drawn hundreds of thousands of participants since June. The group claims that more than 1 million protesters marched against the government's proposed amendments June 9 and more than 2 million people joined a march in the city June 16, though police estimates are considerably lower. The alliance is slated to hold another mass march Aug. 31 in Hong Kong, though organizers have not provided details on that demonstration.

 

Advice

Avoid the march route and other likely protest locations, especially around Chater Garden the evening of Aug. 15, due to the likelihood of violent clashes. Immediately leave the area and shelter in a secure, nongovernment building if violence erupts. Plan for increased security and localized transport disruptions in north-central areas of Hong Kong Island and allow additional time to reach destinations Aug. 18. Follow all police instructions.


Aug. 14 | Warning Alert
Flights normalizing in Hong Kong, China, as of Aug. 14 after court injunction. Additional protests, disruptions possible.

This alert began 14 Aug 2019 05:58 GMT and is scheduled to expire 15 Aug 2019 16:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug. 15
  • Impact: Increased security, flight disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) are attempting to normalize operations as of Aug. 14, after highly disruptive protests at the departures area forced the cancellation of departing flights for a second day. Airlines continue to clear flight backlogs but have canceled dozens of flights Aug. 14; lingering disruptions are possible into Aug. 15.

A court granted the Airport Authority Hong Kong (AA) a temporary injunction Aug. 14 banning further protests outside of designated areas at HKG. Despite the injunction, additional rallies could occur at the airport in the coming days. AA officials previously allowed demonstrations to take place in the arrivals area.

Increased security is highly likely at HKG in the coming days. Authorities may erect barriers near the check-in counters and departure gates to ensure only passengers enter the area. Police could intervene if activists attempt to gather outside of approved protest areas, likely leading to clashes. Further demonstrations in the departures area could prompt more flight disruptions.


 

Background and Analysis

Protesters have gathered at HKG since Aug. 9, but the demonstration escalated Aug. 12, when thousands of activists arrived to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent protests. Airlines and airport operators had delayed or canceled more than 300 flights at HKG, Aug. 13, when hundreds of activists staged a sit-in, blocking access to check-in counters and departure gates. Clashes took place in several areas; demonstrators clashed with both passengers they suspected of being undercover officers, and uniformed police who fired pepper spray and used batons.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on protests at HKG, as activists may not announce plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance at HKG through at least Aug. 15. Confirm ground transport to and from HKG as a precaution. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at the airport. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.
 


Aug. 13 | Critical Alert
Departing flights suspended at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 13 amid protests. Disruptions likely through Aug. 14.

 

This alert began 13 Aug 2019 10:38 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Aug 2019 16:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Protests
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug. 14
  • Impact: Increased security, flight disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities have canceled all remaining departing flights at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) as of 1730 Aug. 13, after thousands of protesters blocked access to departure gates. Check-in counters for many airlines are closed, and only passengers who checked in before 1630 are allowed to board flights. Officials have not canceled any arriving flights as of 1800. However, disruptions to arriving flights remain possible if the protest continues; officials issued a notice ordering all flights from mainland China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their points of origin during a similar protest Aug. 12. As of Aug. 13, cargo flights remain unaffected.

Lingering disruptions are almost certain even after flight operations resume, as carriers work to clear their passenger backlogs; authorities say flight disruptions are likely to continue through at least Aug. 14. Further protests could occur at HKG in the coming days and may exacerbate flight disruptions. Rallies at the airport have remained peaceful; however, clashes between activists and police are possible, especially if authorities attempt to clear the demonstration by force.

 

Background and Analysis

Protesters have gathered at HKG since Aug. 9, but the demonstration escalated Aug. 12, when thousands of activists arrived to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent protests. Airlines and airport operators already delayed or canceled more than 300 flights at HKG, Aug. 13, as officials tried to normalize operations.
 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing, or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 14. Confirm ground transport to and from HKG. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Aug. 12 | Critical Alert
Protest to resume at Hong Kong International Airport, China, from 1300 Aug. 13. Departing flights likely to restart at 0600.

This alert began 12 Aug 2019 17:57 GMT and is scheduled to expire 13 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Protest, flight cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug 13
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Activists have called for large demonstrations to resume at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) starting at 1300 Aug. 13. Thousands of protesters gathered at the facility from the afternoon of Aug. 12 to condemn alleged excessive force used by police during recent demonstrations; most participants had left the facility by late the same day. The protests at HKG have remained peaceful. However, clashes between activists and police are possible, especially if authorities attempt to clear the demonstration by force. Significant turnout in the Aug. 13 protest, or major clashes between activists and police, would almost certainly prompt additional flight cancellations and delays at HKG.

Authorities canceled over 180 departing flights from the afternoon of Aug. 12. Officials also issued a notice ordering that all flights to HKG from mainland China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their points of origin. It remains unclear how long the regional restrictions on inbound flights will remain in place. Most airlines have suspended other scheduled services to HKG, though the majority of inbound long-haul flights have continued. As of early Aug. 13, cargo flights have remained unaffected. Authorities at HKG plan to re-open the facility for departing flights beginning at 0600 Aug 13. Lingering disruptions are almost certain even after flight operations resume, as carriers work to clear their passenger backlogs.

In addition to flight disruptions, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions for the duration of the protests. Demonstrations may disrupt bus and Metro Transit Railway (MTR) services to and from HGK.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters. Further related protests are highly likely in the coming days

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 13. Confirm ground transport availability to and from HKG. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Aug. 12 | Critical Alert
Authorities to re-open Hong Kong International Airport, China, at 0600 Aug. 13 for departing flights. Arriving flights disrupted.

 

This alert began 12 Aug 2019 14:00 GMT and is scheduled to expire 13 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Protest, light cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Time Frame: Through at least Aug 13
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) have stated they plan to re-open the facility from 0600 Aug 13 for departing flights, after over 180 departing flights were canceled Aug 12. Authorities took this action after halting all check-in services for departing flights, due to the presence of large numbers of protesters at landside portions of the terminal. In addition, most flights scheduled to arrive late Aug. 12 have been canceled or diverted. Authorities issued a notice the evening of Aug. 12 ordering that all flights to HKG from elsewhere in China, parts of Southeast Asia, and East Asia be held at their origin points; most airlines have canceled these flights. In addition, most airlines operating flights to Hong Kong from beyond Asia have canceled their flights, with the notable exception of Cathay Pacific (CX), whose long-haul flights to Hong Kong scheduled to arrive early Aug. 13 are largely operating as scheduled. Cargo flights have remained unaffected. Airport officials have urged passengers not to come to HGK Aug. 13 unless their flights have been confirmed.

Authorities took the action after thousands of protesters arrived at HKG the afternoon of Aug. 12, resulting in congestion there, as well as on approaches and public transport to the facility. The majority of protesters have subsequently departed the airport, and congestion has eased. The protest at HKG remained peaceful. Authorities deployed additional personnel to monitor and contain the event.

In addition to disruption to flight services, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions. Once services normalize, lingering disruptions are almost certain as authorities work to clear the significant backlog of flights.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters. Further such action is possible in the coming days

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if arriving, departing or transiting HKG through at least Aug. 13. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Aug. 12 | Critical Alert
Authorities cancel all flights departing after 1800 at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions likely.

 

This alert began 12 Aug 2019 09:17 GMT and is scheduled to expire 13 Aug 2019 04:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Protest, flight cancellations
  • Location: Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Start Time/Date: Afternoon Aug. 12
  • Impact: Increased security; likely air transport disruptions; possible ground transport disruptions, clashes

 

Summary

Authorities at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG) have halted all check-in services for departing flights for at least the remainder of Aug. 12, due to the presence of large numbers of protesters at the Arrivals Hall. Flights for which passengers have already checked-in will depart on schedule until 1800; authorities have cancelled all flights departing after 1800. Incoming flights have not been impacted, and are arriving as scheduled.

Authorities took the action after thousands of protesters arrived at HKG the afternoon of Aug. 12, resulting in congestion there, as well as on approaches to the facility. Thus far, the protest at HKG has remained peaceful. Authorities have deployed additional personnel to monitor and contain the event; the protest has resulted in severe disruption to services at HGK, which could increase the possibility of police using force to disperse participants. This threat is further elevated by the fact that organizers have not sought police permission for the gatherings at the airport.

In addition to disruption to flight services, passengers will likely face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions.


 

Background and Analysis

Activists gathered at HGK to protest proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance, and more specifically, to condemn alleged police violence against protesters in recent days and weeks.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if departing HKG prior to 1800. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at HGK. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.


Aug.11 | Warning Alert
Activists call for additional protests at Hong Kong International Airport, China, Aug. 12. Disruptions, clashes possible.

This alert began 12 Aug 2019 01:54 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Aug 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Protest, sit-in
  • Location: Arrivals Hall, Hong Kong International Airport 
  • Start Time/Date: 1300 Aug. 12
  • Impact: Increased security; possible air and ground transport disruptions, clashes

 

Summary

Activists opposed to proposed amendments to Hong Kong's Fugitive Offenders Ordinance and alleged police violence against protesters are calling for further demonstrations at Hong Kong International Airport (HKG), starting at 1300 Aug. 12. Several thousand people could participate in the action.

Dozens of protesters remain at the Arrivals Hall of the airport as of early Aug. 12 following a three-day sit-in demonstration that began Aug. 9; activists have set up a small staging area in the airport, and protest activity could persist in the short term. While recent actions at HKG have remained peaceful, passengers could face incidental delays due to increased security and associated ground transport disruptions. Organizers have not sought police permission for the gatherings at the airport. Authorities will almost certainly deploy additional personnel to monitor and contain the event; police could use force to disperse the participants if the protest risks becoming too disruptive to airport operations.


 

Advice

Monitor local media for updates on the demonstration, as activists may not announce changes to their plans in advance. Contact airlines to confirm flight schedules. Allow additional time for check-in and security clearance if departing HKG, especially during the time frame of any demonstration. Strictly heed the instructions of security personnel at the airport. Exercise caution if transiting or meeting arriving passengers at the Arrivals Hall. Leave the area immediately if clashes occur.