Overview of Typhoon Trami

Typhoon Trami, the second major storm to develop in less than two weeks, made landfall near Osaka, Japan and again near Tanabe, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan late Sept. 30. Categorized as a super typhoon for a short period of time, Trami continues to weaken. Expect continued disruptions and hazardous weather in Japan. The region is still recovering from Super Typhoon Mangkhut, which killed more than 100 people.

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Below you will find intelligence updates as our team of expert analysts continuously track the storm. These alerts provide a glimpse into one of 11 categories covered by WorldAware intelligence-drive risk management services.

Navigate to each of the weather alert updates below:

October 1 | Update 12: Trami continues to weaken after crossing Honshu, Japan, Sept. 30-Oct. 1.

September 29 | Update 11: Typhoon Trami makes landfall near Tanabe, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, late Sept. 30.

September 29 | Update 10: Typhoon Trami forecast to make landfall near Osaka, Japan, late Sept 30.

September 29 | Update 9: Adverse weather to persist in Ryukyu Islands, Japan, as Trami tracks northeastward.

September 28 | Update 8: Trami to approach Okinawa, Japan, Sept. 29 as a powerful typhoon.

September 27 | Update 7: Typhoon Trami tracks toward Japan's Ryukyu Islands Sept. 28.

September 26 | Update 6: Trami weakens in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 27

September 25 | Update 5: Trami slows in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 26.

September 24 | Update 4: Super Typhoon Trami to slow significantly in the Philippine Sea.

September 23 | Update 3: Trami strengthens into violent typhoon as it continues to track westward in Philippine Sea as of Sept. 24.

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October 1 | Update 12: Trami continues to weaken after crossing Honshu, Japan, Sept. 30-Oct. 1. Hazardous weather and disruptions ongoing.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan

This alert began 01 Oct 2018 05:55 GMT and is scheduled to expire 02 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 300 km (186 miles) east of Kushiro, Hokkaido, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 50 kts (92 kph, 58 mph)
  • Affected Areas: Japan

 

Summary

Trami has weakened into a tropical storm after crossing Honshu overnight Sept. 30-Oct. 1. As of 1250 JST Oct. 1, the system center of circulation was in the Pacific Ocean, approximately 300 km (186 miles) east of Kushiro, Hokkaido. Forecast models indicate that Trami will continue to weaken, transitioning into an extratropical low late Oct. 1, after interacting with cool waters. The storm has killed at least two people and injured at least 120 others, though the casualty count is likely to rise.

Weather Warnings
Despite weakening, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) is maintaining severe weather warnings and advisories for gale-force winds, heavy rain, high waves, storm surge, flooding, landslides, and thunderstorms in eastern Honshu and Hokkaido. Advisories for gale-force winds, high waves, or rainfall remain in effect for most prefectures in the country. Some areas of Kyushu, Shikoku, and Honshu may still be highly susceptible to rain-induced hazards, even though the storm's immediate threat has diminished. Authorities will likely issue updates to active advisories as Trami moves further away from the country.

Hazardous Weather
Although Trami is set to move quickly through the region, rainfall accumulations of over 15 cm (6 inches) are possible across most of Kyushu, Shikoku, and Honshu through at least Oct. 1. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations.

Transport and Utilities
Flooding and landslides can trigger significant business, transport, and utility disruptions in affected areas. Floodwaters and debris flows may render bridges or roadways impassable, while strong winds could down trees and spread debris that damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares.

High winds produced by Typhoon Trami have triggered widespread disruptions to domestic and international flights in Japan, including at airports serving Kochi (KCZ), Nagasaki (NGS), Osaka (ITM, KIX), Tokyo (HND, NRT), and Sendai (SDJ). Though most airports are expected to resume normal operations after Oct. 1, lingering disruptions are likely.

The East Japan Railway Company (JR-East), Central Japan Railway Company (JR-Central), and West Japan Railway Company (JR-West) all temporarily suspended train services across several networks through at least early Oct. 2. Though some services have resumed, significant delays are occurring along rail lines across Honshu. Ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path, including those serving Tokyo, will likely remain suspended until sea conditions have stabilized.

Anticipate significant business disruptions in areas affected by severe inclement weather - authorities may order the temporary closure of local enterprises, schools, and non-essential government services in the event of hazardous conditions. In addition to government-mandated closures, utility disruptions may also impact business operations. As of the morning of Oct. 1, more than 400,000 people were without electricity, primarily in eastern Honshu. Efforts to restore electricity to affected areas are ongoing, but additional power outages remain possible.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

Ryukyu Islands
Residual business, transport, and utility disruptions continue in parts of the Ryukyu islands. In addition to leaving at least 40 people injured in Okinawa, hazardous winds and heavy rainfall produced by Typhoon Trami caused significant infrastructural damage Sept. 28-29. It may take some time for floodwaters in affected areas to recede and for clean-up operations to conclude. The impact of another tropical system, Typhoon Kong-Rey, around Oct. 5 may also exacerbate recovery efforts in the central and southern Ryukyu Islands.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged electricity outages.

 


September 29 | Update 11: Typhoon Trami makes landfall near Tanabe, Wakayama Prefecture, Japan, late Sept. 30. Expect hazardous weather and disruptions.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan

This alert began 29 Sep 2018 23:10 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Approximately 55 km (34 miles) south-southwest of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 80 kts (150 kph, 90 mph)
  • Affected Areas: Japan

 

Summary

Increasingly adverse weather is anticipated across southern and western Japan after Typhoon Trami made landfall near Tanabe, Wakayama Prefecture, Sept. 30. As of 2030 JST, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 55 km (34 miles) south-southwest of Nara, Nara Prefecture, Japan.

Forecast models indicate that Trami will move fairly quickly over central Honshu in the coming hours, potentially entering the Pacific Ocean again around midday Oct. 1. Additional projections suggest that, following its interaction with cool waters, the typhoon will transition into an extratropical low east of Hokkaido late Oct. 1. Although meteorologists have expressed confidence in their latest forecast, Trami's track and intensity could still change over the next 24-48 hours.

Weather Warnings
As of late Sept. 30, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) is maintaining severe weather warnings and advisories for gale-force winds, heavy rain, high waves, storm surge, landslides, and thunderstorms across Kyushu, Shikoku, and Honshu. Authorities will likely issue updates to active advisories as Trami moves northeastward over Japan.

Weather warnings could remain active even after the storm's immediate threat has diminished, as some areas may still be highly susceptible to rain-induced hazards. The possibility of mandatory evacuations cannot be discounted if weather conditions prove particularly hazardous, especially in areas recently affected by the passage of other tropical systems (e.g., Cimaron, Jebi). Reports indicate that authorities have already issued noncompulsory evacuation advisories for an estimated 349,000 people across Japan.

Hazardous Weather
Although Trami is set to move quickly through the region, rainfall accumulations of over 15 cm (6 inches) are possible across most of Kyushu, Shikoku, and Honshu through at least Oct. 1. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations.

Transport and Utilities
In addition to the immediate threat to personal safety, flooding and landslide events can trigger significant business, transport, and utility disruptions in affected areas. Floodwaters and debris flows may render bridges or roadways impassable, while strong winds could down trees and spread debris that damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares.

As of late Sept. 30, high winds produced by Typhoon Trami have triggered widespread disruptions to domestic and international flights in Japan. In addition to significant delays, flight cancellations and detours have been reported at dozens of airports across the country, including those serving Kochi (KCZ), Nagasaki (NGS), Osaka (ITM, KIX), Tokyo (HND, NRT), and Sendai (SDJ). Though most airports are expected to resume normal operations after Oct. 1, lingering disruptions are likely to persist beyond this period.

Disruptions to rail transport have also been reported. The East Japan Railway Company (JR-East), Central Japan Railway Company (JR-Central), and West Japan Railway Company (JR-West) have all announced the temporary suspension of scheduled train services across several networks through at least early Oct. 2. Significant delays are likely along rail lines that remain operational during Typhoon Trami's passage over Honshu. Ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path, including those serving Osaka Bay, will likely remain suspended until sea conditions have stabilized.

Anticipate significant business disruptions in areas affected by severe inclement weather - authorities may order the temporary closure of local enterprises, schools, and non-essential government services in the event of hazardous conditions. In addition to government-mandated closures, utility disruptions may also impact business operations. As many as 300,000 people have been left without electricity in the Kagoshima and Okinawa Prefectures, and at least 64,000 in Osaka Prefecture, since late Sept. 29. Efforts to restore electricity to affected areas remain ongoing, but additional power outages remain possible across southern and western Japan in the coming days.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

Ryukyu Islands
Residual business, transport, and utility disruptions continue to be reported in parts of the Ryukyu islands, Sept. 30. In addition to leaving at least 40 people injured in Okinawa, hazardous winds and heavy rainfall produced by Typhoon Trami caused significant infrastructural damage Sept. 28-29. It may take some time for floodwaters in affected areas to recede and for clean-up operations to conclude. The impact of another tropical system, Typhoon Kong-Rey, around Oct. 5 may also exacerbate recovery efforts in the central and southern Ryukyu Islands.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged electricity outages.

 


September 29 | Update 10: Typhoon Trami forecast to make landfall near Osaka, Japan, late Sept 30. Transport disruptions to occur in southern Japan.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan

This alert began 29 Sep 2018 23:10 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: East China Sea, approximately 283 km (176 miles) south-southwest of Kagoshima, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 95 kts (175 kph, 110 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Near Osaka, late Sept. 30
  • Affected Areas: Japan

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami has strengthened slightly as it tracks northeastward in the East China Sea north of Okinawa early Sept. 30. As of 0300 JST, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 283 km (176 miles) south-southwest of Kagoshima, Japan. Meteorologists predict that Trami will weaken slightly before grazing the southern coast of Shikoku, transiting the Kiisuido Strait, and making landfall near Osaka late Sept. 30. Projections suggest that Trami could further weaken as it quickly moves over central Honshu, potentially transitioning into an extratropical storm once it enters the Pacific Ocean around midday Oct. 1.

Weather Warnings
As of early Sept. 30, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) is maintaining severe weather warnings and advisories for gale-force winds, heavy rain, high waves, and thunderstorms across all of the Ryukyu Islands, Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu. Authorities will likely issue updates to active advisories once Trami makes landfall on mainland Japan or when weather conditions start to improve in the Ryukyu Islands.

Weather warnings could remain active even after the storm's immediate threat has diminished, as some areas may still be highly susceptible to rain-induced hazards. The possibility of localized evacuations cannot be discounted if weather conditions prove particularly hazardous, especially in areas recently affected by the passage of other tropical systems (e.g., Cimaron, Jebi).

Hazardous Weather
At least 18 people have been injured following Typhoon Trami's close approach to the southern Ryukyu Islands Sept. 28-29. The typhoon brought heavy winds, storm surges, and gusty winds to much of Okinawa Prefecture, triggering disruptions to business, transport, and utility services. Hazardous weather conditions associated with Trami will likely continue across the Amami, Okinawa, Osumi, and Tokara islands as the system advances towards mainland Japan.

Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu are experiencing increasingly adverse weather as Typhoon Trami approaches. Although Trami is moving quickly through the region, rainfall accumulations of over 15 cm (6 inches) are possible in the affected areas through at least Oct. 1. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations.

At least 229,000 homes in Osaka Prefecture lost power. As of early Sept. 29, authorities in Kyushu reported at least 64,000 homes were experiencing power outages. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to additional power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
High winds have triggered flight delays and cancellations at regional airports, including - but not limited to - those serving Amami (ASJ), Kagoshima (KOJ), Kochi (KCZ), Nagoya (NGO), Okinawa (OKA), and Osaka (ITM). Officials at OKA halted operations Sept. 29. Authorities at Kansai International Airport (KIX) have canceled all flights from 1100 Sept. 30 through 0600 Oct. 1. Both KIX and OKA are likely to experience significant lingering disruptions in the coming days after operations resume.

Disruptions to rail transport have also been reported. West Japan Railways has suspended many scheduled local services in Kyoto, Osaka, and Kobe. Authorities expect to cancel services linking Tokyo and western Japan sometime Sept. 30. Additional rail links, including underground networks, may experience disruptions during periods of severe inclement weather. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path, including those serving Osaka Bay.

In addition to the immediate threat to personal safety, flooding and landslide events can trigger significant business, transport, and utility disruptions in affected areas. Floodwaters and debris flows may render bridges or roadways impassable, while strong winds could down trees and spread debris that damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged electricity outages.

 


September 29 | Update 9: Adverse weather to persist in Ryukyu Islands, Japan, as Trami tracks northeastward. Possible landfall on southwest Honshu Sept. 30

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan
  • Busan
  • Daegu
  • Pohang
  • Ulsan
  • Jeju

This alert began 29 Sep 2018 12:41 GMT and is scheduled to expire 02 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: East China Sea, approximately 52 km (32 miles) west-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 90 kts (165 kph, 100 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Possible landfall on southwestern coastline of Honshu Island, Japan (late Sept. 30)
  • Affected Areas: Japan; possibly southeastern South Korea

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami has largely maintained its strength as it tracks northwestward in the East China Sea, Sept. 29. As of 1800 JST, the system's center of circulation was located approximately 52 km (32 miles) west-southwest of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa Prefecture, Japan. Meteorologists predict that Trami will strengthen slightly before making landfall on the southwestern coastline of Japan's Honshu Island late Sept. 30, though some uncertainty remains in the system's forecast track and intensity. Additional projections suggest that Trami could start to weaken as it quickly moves over Honshu, potentially transitioning into an extratropical storm once it enters the Pacific Ocean around Oct. 1.

Weather Warnings
As of late Sept. 29, the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) is maintaining severe weather warnings and advisories for gale-force winds, heavy rain, high waves, and thunderstorms across most of Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku, as well as in Okinawa Prefecture. Authorities will likely issue updates to active advisories once Trami makes landfall on mainland Japan or when weather conditions start to improve in the Ryukyu Islands.

Weather warnings could remain active even after the storm's immediate threat has diminished, as some areas may still be highly susceptible to rain-induced hazards. The possibility of localized evacuations cannot be discounted if weather conditions prove particularly hazardous, especially in areas recently affected by the passage of other tropical systems (e.g., Cimaron, Jebi).

Hazardous Weather
Reports indicate that as many as 18 people have been injured following Typhoon Trami's close approach to the southern Ryukyu Islands, Sept. 28-29. The typhoon has brought heavy winds, storm surges, and gusty winds to much of Okinawa Prefecture in the past 24 hours, triggering localized disruptions to business, transport, and utility services. Hazardous weather conditions associated with Trami will likely persist across the Amami, Okinawa, Osumi, and Tokara islands as the system advances towards mainland Japan.

Honshu, Kyushu, and Shikoku are set to experience increasingly adverse weather as Typhoon Trami draws closer Sept. 29-30. Rainfall accumulations of over 15 cm (6 inches) are possible in the Ryukyu Islands, Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu through at least Oct. 1. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
In addition to the immediate threat to personal safety, flooding and landslide events can trigger significant business, transport, and utility disruptions in affected areas. Floodwaters and debris flows may render bridges or roadways impassable, while strong winds could down trees and spread debris that damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares.

High winds may trigger flight delays and cancellations at regional airports in southern Japan, including - but not limited to - those serving Amami (ASJ), Kagoshima (KOJ), Kochi (KCZ), Nagoya (NGO), Okinawa (OKA), and Osaka (ITM). Officials at OKA are planning to halt domestic and international flight operations during Sept. 29; the airport is set to reopen at 0600 Sept. 30, but the resumption of flights will be dependent on weather conditions and any potential infrastructure damage at the facility. Disruptions to rail transport, including underground networks, should be anticipated during periods of severe inclement weather. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path, including Osaka Bay.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

South Korea
Should Typhoon Trami maintain its current trajectory, parts of southeastern South Korea (including Jeju Island) could be impacted by adverse weather conditions from Sept. 30. However, the severity thereof will depend on the system's intensity and proximity to the Korean Peninsula, which will remain subject to change in the coming days. As of late Sept. 29, the Korean Meteorological Administration (KMA) has not issued any severe weather warnings in response to the typhoon.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case of prolonged electricity outages.

 


September 28 | Update 8: Trami to approach Okinawa, Japan, Sept. 29 as a powerful typhoon.
Landfall likely in southern Honshu late Sept. 30.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan
  • Taipei
  • Keelung

This alert began 26 Sep 2018 17:42 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Philippine Sea, approximately 280 km (175 miles) south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 90 kts (165 kph, 100 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Close approach or landfall in Okinawa, Japan (afternoon Sept. 29); possible landfall in southern Honshu (late Sept. 30)
  • Affected Areas: Japan; northern and eastern Taiwan

 

Summary

Trami has maintained typhoon strength as it continues to track through the Philippine Sea late Sept. 28. As of 2030 JST, the center of circulation was approximately 280 km (175 miles) south of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Typhoon Trami is predicted to make a very close approach or landfall in Okinawa by the afternoon of Sept. 29. The system is then expected to track northeastward and could make landfall in southern Honshu - to the south of Osaka - by late Sept. 30. Upon interaction with land, Trami is expected to weaken and ultimately transition into an extratropical storm over northern Japan by Oct. 1. Because of some lingering forecast uncertainty, anticipate further changes to the track and intensity projections over the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
As of late Sept. 28, the outer rain bands of Typhoon Trami were impacting Japan's southern Ryukyu Islands. Weather conditions will continue to deteriorate in southern Japan through Sept. 29 as the typhoon approaches. Officials with the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) have issued storm and high-wave warnings for parts of Okinawa and Kagoshima prefectures; gale, storm surge, and thunderstorm advisories are also in effect for much of the Ryukyu Islands. JMA officials will likely expand these types of weather alerts into parts of Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu as the storm transits the region. There are no typhoon-related alerts ongoing in Taiwan; however, some rainfall, gusty winds, and rough seas are likely in northern and eastern areas through at least Sept. 28.

Heavy rainfall, damaging winds, and dangerous storm surge are likely in southern and central Japan through at least Oct. 1. Widespread rainfall total of over 15 cm (6 inches) is possible in the Ryukyu Islands, Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight delays and cancellations at regional airports in southern Japan, including - but not limited to - those serving Amami (ASJ), Kagoshima (KOJ), Kochi (KCZ), Nagoya (NGO), Okinawa (OKA), and Osaka (ITM). Officials at OKA are planning to halt domestic and international flight operations Sept. 29; the airport is set to reopen at 0600 Sept. 30, but the resumption of flights will be dependent on weather conditions and any potential infrastructure damage at the facility. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.

 


 

September 27 | Update 7: Typhoon Trami tracks toward Japan's Ryukyu Islands Sept. 28. Close approach or landfall in Okinawa expected by Sept. 29.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan
  • Taipei
  • Keelung

This alert began 26 Sep 2018 17:42 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Philippine Sea, approximately 475 km (295 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 90 kts (165 kph, 100 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Close approach to Okinawa, Japan (Sept. 28-29); possible close approach or landfall in Kyushu, Shikoku, or southern Honshu (Sept. 30)
  • Affected Areas: Japan; northern and eastern Taiwan

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami continues to track northwestward through the Philippine Sea early Sept. 28. As of 0100 JST, the center of circulation was approximately 475 km (295 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Forecast models continue to indicate that Trami will make a close approach or landfall in Okinawa as a very strong typhoon by the morning of Sept. 29. The system is then expected to track northeastward, and could make landfall in Kyushu, Shikoku, or southern Honshu around Sept. 30. Upon interaction with land, Trami is expected to weaken and ultimately transition into an extratropical storm over northern Japan by Oct. 1. Because of some lingering forecast uncertainty, anticipate further changes to the track and intensity projections over the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
As of early Sept. 28, the outer rain bands of Typhoon Trami were approaching Japan's Ryukyu Islands. Weather conditions will continue to deteriorate throughout the day as Trami tracks toward the region. Officials with the Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA) have issued high-wave warnings for parts of Okinawa and Kagoshima prefectures; gale, storm surge, and thunderstorm advisories are also in effect for much of the Ryukyu Islands. JMA officials will likely expand these types of weather alerts into parts of Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu as the storm transits the region. There are no typhoon-related alerts ongoing in Taiwan; however, some rainfall, gusty winds, and rough seas are likely in northern and eastern areas through at least Sept. 28.

Heavy rainfall, damaging winds, and dangerous storm surge are likely in southern and central Japan through at least Oct. 1. Widespread rainfall total of over 15 cm (6 inches) is possible in the Ryukyu Islands, Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight delays and cancellations at regional airports in southern Japan, including - but not limited to - those serving Amami (ASJ), Kagoshima (KOJ), Kochi (KCZ), Nagoya (NGO), Okinawa (OKA), and Osaka (ITM). Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.

 


 

September 26 | Update 6: Trami weakens in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 27.
Storm likely to transit the Ryukyu Islands, approach southern Japan Sept. 28-30.

 

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Japan
  • Taipei
  • Keelung

This alert began 26 Sep 2018 17:42 GMT and is scheduled to expire 01 Oct 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Philippine Sea, approximately 565 km (350 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 90 kts (165 kph, 100 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Close approach to Okinawa, Japan (Sept. 28-29); possible close approach or landfall in Kyushu, Shikoku, or southern Honshu (Sept. 30)
  • Affected Areas: Japan; northern and eastern Taiwan

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami has weakened considerably in the Philippine Sea early Sept. 27. As of 0100 JST, the center of circulation was roughly 565 km (350 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Trami is no longer classified as a "super typhoon," and maximum sustained winds near the center of circulation have fallen to an estimated 165 kph (100 mph). Forecast models indicate that the system could gain some additional strength as it starts to move toward Japan's Ryukyu Islands over the coming days. Trami is predicted to make a close approach to Okinawa Sept. 28-29 before turning northeastward. Although track forecast confidence is still low, meteorologists expect the typhoon could make a close approach or landfall in Kyushu, Shikoku, or southern Honshu around Sept. 30. Because of lingering forecast uncertainty, anticipate some changes to the track and intensity projections over the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
Officials with the Japan Meteorological Agency have issued high wave advisories for much of the Ryukyu Islands as of Sept. 27. The advisories will probably be upgraded to warnings in Okinawa and Kagoshima prefectures as Trami approaches in the coming days. Heavy rain and gale-force wind warnings are also likely in the Ryukyu Islands and Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu as the storm transits the region. There are no typhoon-related alerts ongoing in Taiwan; however, some rainfall, gusty winds, and rough seas are likely in northern and eastern areas through at least Sept. 28.

The extent and severity of weather-related impacts in Japan will become clearer as forecast guidance improves over the coming days. Nevertheless, heavy rainfall, damaging winds, and dangerous storm surge are likely in southern Japan through at least Oct. 1. Widespread rainfall total of over 15 cm (6 inches) is possible in the Ryukyu Islands, Kyushu, Shikoku, and southern Honshu. This heavy rain has the potential to cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight disruptions - including delays and cancellations - at regional airports in southern Japan. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.


 

September 25 | Update 5: Trami slows in the Philippine Sea, Sept. 26.
Likely to transit Japan's Ryukyu Islands; could approach Kyushu by Sept. 30.

 

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Taiwan
  • Fukuoka
  • Okinawa (Naha)
  • Nagasaki
  • Laoag City
  • Tuguegarao City
  • Kagoshima
  • Sasebo
  • Kitakyushu
  • Kumamoto

This alert began 25 Sep 2018 17:10 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Sep 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Super Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Philippine Sea, approximately 700 km (435 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 130 kts (240 kph, 150 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date): Close approach to Japan's Ryukyu Islands (Sept. 28-30); possible approach near Kyushu (late Sept. 30)
  • Affected Areas: Japan; northern and eastern Taiwan; possibly far northern Luzon, Philippines

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami (known in the Philippines as "Typhoon Paeng") has maintained super-typhoon strength as it slowly moves through the Philippine Sea. As of 0100 JST Sept. 26, the center of circulation was approximately 700 km (435 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Only minor forward movement is likely through Sept. 27 as the typhoon experiences a lack of steering winds. Because of this slow advancement, forecast models indicate that Trami could start to weaken upon interaction with cooler water temperatures caused by upwelling. Although some uncertainty exists with Trami's forecasted track, current models indicate that the system will approach and transit near Japan's Ryukyu Islands as a typhoon Sept. 28-30; longer-range models indicate that the system could approach or make landfall in Kyushu late Sept. 30. Anticipate significant changes to track and intensity forecasts over the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
As of early Sept. 26, weather agencies in Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines have not yet issued weather-related warnings associated with Super Typhoon Trami. If the system follows current forecast guidance, the most significant weather hazards will occur in the Ryukyu Islands and southern and central Japan, Sept. 28-Nov. 2. The outer rain bands of the system could also produce some light to moderate rainfall in far northern Luzon, Philippines, and in eastern and northern Taiwan during the storm's transit. Gusty winds are possible in coastal areas of northern Taiwan depending on the proximity of the center of circulation.

Heavy rainfall could cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area. The extent and severity of weather-related impacts in Japan will become more clear as forecast guidance improves over the coming days.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight disruptions - including delays and cancellations - at regional airports. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.

 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.

 


 

September 24 | Update 4: Super Typhoon Trami to slow significantly in the Philippine Sea.
Could approach Japan's Ryukyu Islands by Sept. 28.

 

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Taiwan
  • Okinawa (Naha)
  • Laoag City
  • Tuguegarao City

This alert began 24 Sep 2018 17:55 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Sep 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Super Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation:
    Philippine Sea, approximately 790 km (490 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 130
    kts (240 kph, 150 mph)
  • Projected Landfall (Date):
    Possible close approach to Japan's Ryukyu Islands (Sept. 28)
  • Affected Areas: Ryukyu Islands, Japan; northern and eastern Taiwan; possibly far northern Luzon, Philippines

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami (known in the Philippines as "Typhoon Paeng") has strengthened into a super typhoon in the Philippine Sea early Sept. 25. As of 0200 JST, the center of circulation was approximately 790 km (490 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Forecast models indicate that Trami could continue to intensify over the next 24 hours as it traverses an area of high sea surface temperatures. A lack of steering currents will likely cause the system to slow significantly Sept. 25-27 in the Philippine Sea. Minimal movement over that period could result in enough upwelling of cooler water, causing the typhoon to weaken starting Sept. 26.

A significant amount of uncertainty exists in the forecast track of the typhoon as it approaches Japan's Ryukyu Islands, Sept. 28. Current predictions indicate that Trami could make a close approach to the Yaeyama and Miyako islands before turning northeastward and transiting near Okinawa and mainland Japan through at least Nov. 2. Anticipate significant changes to track and intensity forecasts over the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
As of early Sept. 25, weather agencies in Japan, Taiwan, and the Philippines have not yet issued weather-related warnings associated with Super Typhoon Trami. If the system follows current forecast guidance, the most significant weather hazards will occur in the Ryukyu Islands and possibly southern and central Japan, Sept. 28-Nov. 2. The outer rain bands of the system could also produce some adverse weather in far northern Luzon, Philippines, and in eastern and northern Taiwan during the storm's transit.

Heavy rainfall could cause life-threatening flash and areal flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water. Urban flooding is also a concern in areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations. Strong winds could cause property damage, uproot trees, and lead to extensive power outages throughout the affected area.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight disruptions - including delays and cancellations - at regional airports. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.


 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.


 

September 23 | Update 3: Trami strengthens into violent typhoon as it continues to track westward in Philippine Sea as of Sept. 24. Severe weather likely.

Click above map for interactive Google Map of Typhoon Trami.

The locations affected by this alert are:

  • Metro Manila
  • Taipei
  • Okinawa (Naha)
  • Subic Bay Freeport Zone (Olongapo City)
  • Clark Freeport Zone (Angeles City)
  • Baguio City
  • Laoag City
  • Tuguegarao City

This alert began 23 Sep 2018 21:47 GMT and is scheduled to expire 26 Sep 2018 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Typhoon Trami
  • Center of Circulation: Philippine Sea, approximately 1,043 km (648 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan
  • Maximum Sustained Winds: 120 kts (222 kph, 138 mph)
  • Affected Areas: Ryuku Islands, Japan; eastern Taiwan; northeast Luzon, Philippines

 

Summary

Typhoon Trami (Philippines name "Typhoon Paeng") has strengthened into a violent typhoon as it continues to track westward across the Philippine Sea Sept. 24. As of 0600 JST, the system's center of circulation was approximately 1,043 km (648 miles) south-southeast of Kadena Air Base, Okinawa, Japan. Forecast models indicate the system will shift to a northwesterly course early Sept. 24, intensifying even further and becoming a super typhoon, with sustained winds of 140 knots (260 kph, 161 mph), by late Sept. 25 or early Sept. 26. Meteorologists are currently predicting that Trami will likely remain a very strong and dangerous storm as it approaches Taiwan Sept. 28. However, there is still significant uncertainty in the long-term forecast; the system's track and intensity could change in the coming days.

Hazardous Weather
As of Sept. 24, no weather agency has issued warnings due to Trami. Depending on the storm's path, severe weather is possible in Taiwan; northern Luzon, Philippines; and Japan's Ryukyu Islands from around Sept. 27. Even if the system does not make landfall, projections suggest Trami may slow Sept. 26-27, increasing the chances of sustained rainfall in these areas. Heavy rainfall could cause flooding in low-lying communities near creeks, rivers, streams, or other bodies of water, as well as in urban areas with easily overwhelmed stormwater drainage systems. Sites downstream of large reservoirs or rivers may be subject to flooding after relatively short periods of intense rainfall. Coastal flooding may occur during significant storm surges. Rain-induced landslides pose an additional threat in hilly or mountainous locations.

Transport
Inclement weather associated with the system could trigger localized business, transport, and utility disruptions. Floodwaters may render some bridges or roadways impassable, impacting ground travel in and around affected areas. Strong winds could down trees or spread debris, which could damage infrastructure (including power lines) or impede access to important thoroughfares. High winds may trigger flight disruptions - including delays and cancellations - at regional airports. Hazardous sea conditions could prompt the temporary suspension of ferry services and port operations in areas near the storm's path.

Disruptions triggered by inclement weather and resultant hazards, such as flooding, could persist well after conditions have improved. If there is severe damage to infrastructure, repair or reconstruction efforts may exacerbate residual disruptions.


 

Advice

Monitor local media for weather updates and related advisories. Prepare for the storm's arrival as early as possible; activate contingency plans if operating in areas where flooding and landslides are possible. Plan for potential delivery delays. Confirm all transport reservations before travel. Stockpile bottled water and charge battery-powered devices in case prolonged electricity outages occur.


Resources

Joint Typhoon Warning Center (JTWC): www.metoc.navy.mil
Japan Meteorological Agency (JMA): www.jma.go.jp
Central Weather Bureau (Taiwan): www.cwb.gov.tw

Philippine Atmospheric, Geophysical and Astronomical Services Administration (PAGASA): bagong.pagasa.dost.gov.ph
East Japan Railway Company (JR-East): www.jreast.co.jp
Central Japan Railway Company (JR-Central): global.jr-central.co.jp
West Japan Railway Company (JR-West): www.westjr.co.jp