Protests are taking place in Haiti amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, and while the government faces allegations of corruption. Opposition supporters continue to call for the president's resignation. WorldAware is monitoring the security situation in Haiti. Protests and riots continue to cripple transport throughout Haiti and force businesses to close. Below are the alerts that have been released regarding unrest in the nation, click on each of the alerts to get an expanded intelligence analysis as the situation has evolved.

Navigate to each of the alert updates below:

March 28 | Warning Alert: Opposition groups to hold anti-government protests nationwide in Haiti, March 29. Heightened security, disruptions likely. Clashes possible.

March 6 | Warning Alert: Opposition groups to protest nationwide in Haiti, March 7-8, to demand President Moise's resignation. Disruptions, clashes likely.

February 20 | Critical Alert: Opposition groups in Haiti reject government negotiations; nationwide protests planned from Feb. 22. 

February 18 | Critical Alert: Haiti's Prime Minister unable to appease the opposition; protests likely to persist through February.

February 15 | Critical Alert: Violent protests to continue in Haiti, especially after president refuses to resign Feb. 14.

February 13 | Critical Alert: Opposition groups staging protest marches across Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Feb. 13. 

February 12 | Critical Alert: Violent protests escalating across Haiti as of Feb. 12. 

February 12 | Warning Alert: Violent protests escalating across in Haiti, as of Feb. 11. 

February 11 | Warning Alert: Anti-government activists demanding the resignation of the president likely to protest through February. 

February 10 | Warning Alert: Anti-government activists likely to continue nationwide protests in Haiti, Feb. 10. 

February 6 | Warning Alert: Anti-government activists planning nationwide protests in Haiti, Feb. 7. 

February 3 | Warning Alert: Activists and unions call for nationwide strike in Haiti, Feb. 4. 


March 28: Opposition groups to hold anti-government protests nationwide in Haiti, March 29. Heightened security, disruptions likely. Clashes possible.
 

This alert began 28 Mar 2019 10:12 GMT and is scheduled to expire 30 Mar 2019 06:00 GMT.

  • Event: Opposition protests
  • Location: Nationwide, especially Port-au-Prince and Cap-Haitien 
  • Date: March 29
  • Impact: Heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; possible clashes

 

Summary

Several opposition platforms, including the Secteur Democratique et Populaire and the Platfom Pitit Desalin party are planning nationwide protests March 29, to demand the resignation of President Jovenel Moise. Organizers have not released details of the protests; however, the largest demonstrations will likely occur in and around Port-au-Prince and in Cap-Haitien. In the capital, common flashpoints for protests include Rue Champs de Mars, Palais National, and Parliament, as well as Delmas and Petionville. Protests are also likely to affect Gonaives, Hinche, Jacmel, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, and Petit-Goave. 

Authorities will almost certainly maintain a heavy police presence throughout Port-au-Prince and near protests elsewhere and could use force, including lethal force, against protesters. Demonstrators are likely to block major roads, including routes leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP). There is an elevated threat of violence at all protests that materialize in Haiti. During previous agitations, protesters have burnt vehicles and vandalized private businesses. Anti-government protesters could also throw rocks at journalists, bystanders, or passing vehicles. The protests are likely to cause significant disruptions to commercial operations and transport, especially in the capital.

 

Background and Analysis

Anti-government protests in Haiti occur sporadically on a near-daily basis; however, the wave of violent protests which began Feb. 7 and has left at least nine people dead, has largely subsided. The protests are in response to the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities, and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds.

On March 18, the lower chamber of deputies passed a vote of no confidence against Prime Minister Jean Henry Ceant, despite his efforts to implement economic measures to address the crisis. Following the vote, President Moise announced Minister of Culture and Communication Jean Michel Lapin as interim Prime Minister. Lapin, who will also maintain his position as minister, will likely continue to face the same pressures as Ceant amid the crippling economic crisis, and until Moise resigns as president.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little-to-no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


March 6: Opposition groups to protest nationwide in Haiti, March 7-8, to demand President Moise's resignation. Disruptions, clashes likely.
 

This alert began 06 Mar 2019 20:05 GMT and is scheduled to expire 08 Mar 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide 
  • Time Frame: March 7-8
  • Impact: Clashes; heightened security; commercial and transportation disruptions; possible shortages of essential goods

 

Summary

The Konbit Oganizasyon Politik, Senkikal ak Popile - an umbrella group of several political, trade, and civil society organizations - plans to hold nationwide protests in Haiti, March 7-8, to demand the resignation of President Jovenel Moise. Organizers have not released details of the protests; however, the largest demonstrations will likely occur in and around Port-au-Prince and in Cap-Haitien. Protest rallies and marches could extend beyond the announced two-day time frame.

Demonstrators are likely to block major roads, including routes leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP), burn vehicles, and vandalize private businesses. Anti-government protesters could throw rocks at journalists, bystanders, or passing vehicles. While there is currently no indication that US nationals are specifically being targeted, anti-US sentiment could escalate.

Authorities will almost certainly maintain a heavy police presence throughout Port-au-Prince and near protests elsewhere and can use force, including lethal force, against protesters. In the capital, Rue Champs de Mars, Palais National, and Parliament, as well as Delmas and Petionville, are likely to remain flashpoints for protests. Protests are also likely to affect Cap-Haitien, Fort-Liberte, Gonaives, Hinche, Jacmel, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Mirebalais, Petit-Goave, Plaisance, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc. 

 

Background and Analysis

Numerous protests and strikes in February turned violent, with at least nine people killed in clashes between protesters and police. The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities, and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On March 1, US Under Secretary of State for Political Affairs David Hale traveled to Haiti and met with representatives of the government, the opposition, and other sectors. While the government celebrated his attempts to facilitate a dialogue, opposition representatives rejected any possibility of negotiation, and continue to demand Moise's resignation as the initial step toward solving the crisis.

In late February, several airlines announced a reduction in the frequency of their flights to Haiti due to the wave of violent protests. JetBlue (B6) plans to reduce the number of flights from New York, Boston, Orlando, and Fort Lauderdale starting in April; Air Transat (TS) will reduce its flights from Montreal in March and April, and Air Canada (AC) has suspended its flights from Montreal through the end of April. 

The US and Canadian governments maintain a "do not travel" advisory to Haiti, while the UK's Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) advises against all but essential travel to Haiti. France's government advises caution to its citizens traveling to Haiti, due to the uncertainty of the situation. 

 

Advice

Consider deferring nonessential travel to Haiti until the situation stabilizes. If currently in the country, avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little-to-no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


February 20: Opposition groups in Haiti reject government negotiations; nationwide protests planned from Feb. 22. Disruptions, clashes likely.

This alert began 20 Feb 2019 13:07 GMT and is scheduled to expire 25 Feb 2019 10:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Clashes, heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; possible shortages of essential goods

 

Summary

Opposition groups including the Secteur democratique et populaire, which has been leading many of the current protests in Haiti, have called for a fresh round of nationwide demonstrations from Feb. 22 to demand President Jovenel Moise's immediate resignation, and to show their rejection of the president's proposed dialogue. There has been a general lull in the protests since Feb. 18, and normal commercial and public service operations have resumed in several areas, especially the capital, Port-au-Prince. However, given that the demands of the opposition have not been met, the political environment remains tense and the forthcoming protests could be well attended. Unannounced protests are possible leading up to and after Feb. 22.

The protests are likely to continue to focus on the capital. Protesters have blocked major roads, burnt vehicles, and vandalized businesses, and could continue with these tactics. Anti-government protesters could throw rocks at journalists and bystanders, or passing vehicles. A group of around 200 protesters burnt a US flag during the protests in the capital on Feb. 15 and accused the US of being responsible for the crisis. There is currently no indication that US nationals are specifically being targeted; however, anti-US sentiment could escalate. 

Authorities will almost certainly maintain a heavy police presence throughout Port-au-Prince and near protests elsewhere. Severe business and transport disruptions are likely to persist, including along routes leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP). In the capital, Rue Champs de Mars, Palais National, and Parliament are likely to remain flashpoints for protests as well as Delmas and Petionville. Protests have also been affecting Cap-Haitien, Fort-Liberte, Gonaives, Hinche, Jacmel, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Mirebalais, Petit-Goave, Plaisance, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc. Widespread shortages of food, drinking water, and fuel have been reported across the country amid the crisis. 

Foreign governments have issued several advisories in response to the civil unrest. The US and Canadian governments maintain a "do not travel" advisory. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) currently advises against all but essential travel to Haiti due to the current unstable and dangerous security situation.

 

Airports

Both PAP and Cap-Haitien International Airport (CAP) remain operational and commercial flights are available, as of early Feb. 20. However, the operational status of these airports could change at short notice. International airlines have previously suspended flight operations in Haiti amid widespread unrest; similar measures are possible in the coming weeks. All Air Canada (AC) flights scheduled for Feb. 20 have been suspended. It is unclear when AC will resume its flight schedule. Regardless of the status of airports, ground travel to and from PAP could be significantly hindered on days when major protests have been planned. 

 

Background and Analysis

The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation, but this did not quell the unrest. Opposition groups continue to view Moise' resignation as the only solution and have rejected the president's calls for negotiations. The Religions for Peace platform has also rejected Moise's request to serve as mediators. Meanwhile, Moise has appealed to various groups and individuals, including the private sector and former provisional president Jocelerme Privert Feb. 19, as part of his efforts to launch a national dialogue. A protracted protest campaign will place increased pressure on Moise to step down as president in 2019; however, a significant challenge for opposition leaders is maintaining the momentum of anti-government protests amid the widespread shortages of food and water. 

 

Advice

Consider deferring nonessential travel to Haiti until the situation stabilizes. If currently in the country, avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


February 18: Haiti's Prime Minister unable to appease the opposition; protests likely to persist through February. Roadblocks, clashes likely.

This alert began 18 Feb 2019 09:14 GMT and is scheduled to expire 28 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Clashes, heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; possible shortages of essential goods

 

Summary

Prime Minister Jean-Henry Ceant announced Feb. 16 that the government would cut the prime minister's budget by 30 percent and withdraw all unnecessary privileges for high-level government officials. However, the announcement has not had the intended effect of appeasing opposition protesters, with fresh protests planned from Feb. 18. President Jovenel Moise also remains insistent that he will not resign, despite this being one of the key demands of protesters. The capital is likely to remain the worst affected by the civil unrest. Protesters have blocked major roads, burnt vehicles, and vandalized businesses, and are likely to continue with these tactics. Anti-government protesters could throw rocks at journalists and bystanders, or passing vehicles. A group of around 200 protesters burnt a US flag during the protests in the capital on Feb. 15, and accused the US of being responsible for the crisis; however, there is currently no indication that US nationals are specifically being targeted. Separately, a group of eight men, including US, Serbian and Russian nationals, were reportedly arrested at a police checkpoint near the Central Bank on Feb. 17, for the alleged possession of illegal weapons. It is suspected that the individuals were part of an armed private security group, but further details are unknown. Authorities will almost certainly maintain a heavy police presence throughout Port-au-Prince and near protests elsewhere. Severe business and transport disruptions are likely to persist, including along routes leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP). While the protests are widespread, in the capital, Rue Champs de Mars, Palais National, and Parliament are likely to remain flashpoints for protests as well as Delmas and Petionville. Protests have also been affecting Cap-Haitien, Fort-Liberte, Gonaives, Hinche, Jacmel, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Mirebalais, Petit-Goave, Plaisance, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc. Widespread shortages of food, drinking water, and fuel have been reported across the country amid the crisis. Foreign governments have issued several advisories in response to the civil unrest. On Feb. 14, the US government upgraded its Travel Advisory to a "Level 4 - Do Not Travel." This is the highest advisory level due to a greater likelihood of life-threatening risks; the US Department of State advises its citizens to not travel to the country or to leave as soon as it is safe to do so. The French and Canadian governments have also issued similar "do not travel" advisories. The Foreign and Commonwealth Office (FCO) currently advises against all but essential travel to Haiti due to the current unstable and dangerous security situation.

 

Airports

Both PAP and Cap-Haitien International Airport (CAP) remain operational and commercial flights are available, as of late Feb. 17. However, the operational status of these airports could change at short notice. International airlines have previously suspended flight operations in Haiti amid widespread unrest; similar measures are possible in the coming weeks. All Air Canada (AC) flights operating in and out of PAP will be suspended from Feb. 20. Regardless of the status of airports, ground travel to and from PAP could be significantly hindered by the protests and could negatively impact persons intending to depart.

 

Background and Analysis

The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation. The declaration includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. However, opponents of Moise contend that the economic state of emergency and the economic measures announced by Ceant Feb. 16 is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest; opposition supporters continue to call for the president's resignation. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and have rejected negotiations with the president; Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Consider deferring nonessential travel to Haiti until the situation stabilizes. If currently in the country, avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation


February 15: Violent protests to continue in Haiti, especially after president refuses to resign Feb. 14. Roadblocks, looting, clashes likely.

This alert began 15 Feb 2019 09:38 GMT and is scheduled to expire 28 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Clashes, heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions

 

Summary

The security situation in Haiti is likely to continue to deteriorate over the coming days and weeks, especially after President Jovenel Moise's first address to the nation Feb. 14, since the unrest escalated earlier in February. During his speech, Moise refused to resign - which has been one of the key demands of protesters - and rejected the possibility of a transitional government. In the immediate aftermath of Moise's speech, protests erupted throughout various parts of the capital, Port-au-Prince, late Feb. 14.

The capital is likely to remain the worst affected by the civil unrest. Protesters have blocked major roads, burnt vehicles, and vandalized businesses, and are likely to continue with these tactics. Anti-government protesters could throw rocks at journalists and bystanders, or passing vehicles. While the protests are widespread, Rue Champs de Mars, Palais National, and Parliament are likely to remain flashpoints for protests. Sporadic gunfire has been reported in Petion-Ville, a relatively affluent suburb where expatriates and visitors often stay; demonstrations there have been centered around President Moise's private residence. Protests have also been affecting Cap-Haitien, Fort-Liberte, Gonaives, Hinche, Jacmel, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Mirebalais, Petit-Goave, Plaisance, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc.

Authorities will almost certainly maintain a heavy police presence throughout Port-au-Prince and near protests elsewhere. Severe business and transport disruptions are likely across the city, including along routes leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP). Roadblocks on Boulevard Toussaint Louverture west of the Carrefour Fleuriot intersection have been occurring daily. 

In response to the protests, on Feb. 14, the U.S. government upgraded its Travel Advisory to a "Level 4 - Do Not Travel." This is the highest advisory level due to a greater likelihood of life-threatening risks; the US Department of State advises its citizens to not travel to the country or to leave as soon as it is safe to do so.

 

Airports

Both PAP and Cap-Haitien International Airport (CAP) remain operational and commercial flights are available, as of late Feb. 14. However, the operational status of these airports could change at short notice. International airlines have previously suspended flight operations in Haiti amid widespread unrest; similar measures are possible in the coming weeks. Regardless of the status of airports, ground travel to and from PAP could be significantly hindered by the protests and could negatively impact persons intending to depart. 

 

Background and Analysis

Protests and riots continue to cripple transport throughout Haiti and force businesses to close. The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation. The declaration includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. During his speech Feb. 14, Moise reiterated his economic plans in response to the country's crisis; however, opponents of Moise contend that, in the absence of a clear economic plan, the economic state of emergency is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest; opposition supporters continue to call for the president's resignation. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and have rejected negotiations with the president; Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Consider deferring nonessential travel to Haiti until the situation stabilizes. If currently in the country, avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


February 13: Opposition groups staging protest marches across Port-au-Prince, Haiti, Feb. 13. Violence highly likely. Shelter in place.

This alert began 13 Feb 2019 19:48 GMT and is scheduled to expire 14 Feb 2019 08:00 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Port-au-Prince 
  • Date: Feb. 13
  • Impact: Clashes; commercial and transportation disruptions; increased police presence

 

Summary

Several opposition groups, including the Secteur democratique et populaire, have launched a coordinated series of protests in locations across Port-au-Prince, Feb. 13, to call for President Jovenel Moise's immediate resignation. Local sources indicate that the action was planned to consist of 10 separate wings of marchers moving across the Haitian capital; however, organizers have released information for only seven. No specific start times or march routes had been announced, but activist leaders did reveal that the various wings of demonstrators would be moving through the following areas of the city:

  • Protest Wing No. 1: Cite Soleil neighborhood,Trois Mains Crossroads (Carrefour Trois Mains), Airport Crossroads (Carrefour Aeroport), the Nazon and Lalue neighborhoods
  • Protest Wing No. 2: Aviation Crossroads (Carrefour Aviation), Saint John Bosco Church, La Saline, Delmas 2, Bel Air neighborhood, and Place de la Peur
  • Protest Wing No. 3: Kenscoff, Thomassin, Petion-Ville, Jalouzi, Bourdon, and in front of the Musee du Pantheon National Haitien
  • Protest Wing No. 4: Croix des Bouquets, Gerald Bataille Crossroads, Delmas 33, Delmas 32, Place Petion, and the Bureau of Ethnology
  • Protest Wing No. 5: Carrefour Feuille, Premier Avenue, Rue Alerte, Rue Cameau, Rue Capois
  • Protest Wing No. 6: Gressier, Carrefour, Route des Railes, Admiral Killick Naval Base; Mariani, Carrefour Marketplace; Saint Charles Church, Thor, Diquini, Admiral Killick Naval Base
  • Protest Wing No. 7: Fontamara, Martissant, Grand Rue, Rue Champs de Mars, the Palais National, and in front of the Bureau of Ethnology

Authorities will almost certainly deploy a heavy police presence near all demonstrations that may materialize due to the high likelihood of violence. While it remains unclear how long the protests will last, they will probably continue well into the evening of Feb. 13. Severe business and transport disruptions are likely across the city, including along routes leading to Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP). 

 

Background and Analysis

Protests and riots continue to cripple transport throughout Haiti and force businesses to close. The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities, and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation. The state of economic emergency includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. Opponents of President Moise contend that, in the absence of a clear economic plan, the economic state of emergency is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest; opposition supporters continue to call for the president's resignation. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, as demonstrations may occur with little-to-no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


February 12: Violent protests escalating across Haiti as of Feb. 12. Road blocks and looting cripple transport and business operations.

This alert began 12 Feb 2019 23:24 GMT and is scheduled to expire 28 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Clashes; commercial and transportation disruptions; increased police presence

 

Summary

Protests and riots continue to cripple transport throughout Haiti and force businesses to close as of Feb. 12. Demonstrations on the roads leading to Port-au-Prince's Toussaint Louverture International Airport (PAP) threaten to impede access to to the facility and roadblocks have rendered some intercity transport impossible.

The parliamentary opposition called for President Jovenel Moise's immediate resignation as major protests largely brought commercial activity to a halt in Cap-Haitien, Fort-Liberte, Gonaives, Hinche, Jeremie, Leogane, Les Cayes, Miragoane, Mirebalais, Petit-Goave, Plaisance, Port-au-Prince, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc.

Protests were particularly disruptive in Port-au-Prince. Demonstrators set up roadblocks in the Martissant and Nazon neighborhoods, as well as near the SONAPI Industrial Park, and significant looting occurred in the Delmas and Petion-Ville areas. Sporadic gunfire was also heard in Petion-Ville, a relatively affluent suburb where expatriates and visitors often stay; demonstrations there have been centered around President Moise's private residence. Protests have also occurred in the city's shantytowns; demonstrators from Cite Soleil, one of the most impoverished areas of the capital, marched to the National Palace demanding Moise's resignation.

Protesters continue to block major roads by burning tires and vehicles. In Leogane, demonstrators blocked National Route 2, which connects the Tiburon Peninsula and Port-au-Prince. Such roadblocks have significantly disrupted commercial operations and public transportation. Schools and banks were mostly closed as of Feb. 12, and several gas stations were also closed, creating the possibility of future fuel shortages. Police have frequently used tear gas to disperse the protests, sometimes also resorting to firing live ammunition. Several fatalities have occurred in the violence.

Taking advantage of the chaotic situation, prisoners in Aquin revolted, leading to the escape of 78 inmates. The prisoners were not immediately rearrested and pose a threat in the area.

 

Background and Analysis

The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation. The state of economic emergency includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. Opponents of President Moise contend that, in the absence of a clear economic plan, the economic state of emergency is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest; opposition supporters continue to call for the president's resignation. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.
 


February 12: Violent protests escalating across in Haiti, as of Feb. 11. Road blocks and looting likely. Avoid all demonstrations.

This alert began 12 Feb 2019 01:44 GMT and is scheduled to expire 18 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Clashes, commercial and transportation disruptions, increased police presence

 

Summary

Rioting will likely intensify further over the coming days in Haiti after President Jovenel Moise refused to meet demonstrators' demands to resign by 1200 Feb. 11. Major protests and riots followed the deadline, particularly in Port-au-Prince, where demonstrators gathered in front of the National Palace. Looting occurred in the city's Delmas neighborhood. The relatively affluent suburb of Petion-Ville, where expatriates and visitors often stay, has also seen major protests, notably near the president's private residence.

The most recent spate of violence began Feb. 7, and large-scale demonstrations have spread to most major cities, including Cap-Haitien, Gonaives, Jacmel, Les Cayes, Mirebalais, Miragoane, Petit-Goave, Hinche, Port Salut, and Saint-Marc. Clashes between protesters and police have occurred in these cities. Demonstrators have attacked government buildings, including setting fire to the city hall in Saint-Marc. Protesters continue to block major roads and burn vehicles, as well as vandalize and loot businesses. The unrest has significantly disrupted commercial operations and public transportation. Police have frequently used tear gas to disperse the protests, sometimes also resorting to firing live ammunition. Several fatalities have occurred in the violence.

 

Background and Analysis

The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country to address the situation. The state of economic emergency includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. Opponents of President Moise contend that, in the absence of a clear economic plan, the economic state of emergency is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest; oppositionists continue to call for the president's ouster. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.


February 11: Anti-government activists demanding the resignation of the president likely to protest through February. Violence probable.

This alert began 11 Feb 2019 13:00 GMT and is scheduled to expire 28 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Incident: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide 
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Anti-government activists and opposition groups are likely to continue to stage planned and spontaneous protests across Haiti over the coming weeks. Opposition supporters are protesting President Jovenel Moise's administration, and are denouncing poverty, general insecurity, and perceived government corruption. Major protests were organized Feb. 7; however, the protests have since persisted, with at least four people killed and dozens more injured. Some agitators have threatened further protests if Moise does not resign by 1200 Feb. 11. The opposition Famni Lavalas has also called on its supporters to remain mobilized until the president resigns.

The largest protests are likely to continue to focus on the capital. Rallies could occur near the National Palace, Parliament, as well as in Petionville and Delmas. Protesters have blocked major roads, burnt vehicles, and vandalized businesses, and are likely to continue with these tactics. The protest action will continue to disrupt commercial operations and public transportation. Heightened security measures are standard near government offices and in the vicinity of demonstrations. Police have made frequent use of tear gas to disperse the protests; the use of live ammunition has also become increasingly common during protests, especially in the capital.

 

Background and Analysis

The protests take place amid the depreciation of the national currency, increases in the prices of basic necessities and worsening fuel shortages, all while the government faces allegations of corruption within the judiciary and relating to the mismanagement of PetroCaribe funds. On Feb. 5, Haiti's Council of Ministers declared a state of economic emergency throughout the country, to address the ongoing economic situation. The state of economic emergency includes the government's implementation of austerity measures relating to the use of government resources. Opponents of Moise contend that in the absence of a clear economic plan, the economic state of emergency is a ruse to quell the persistent unrest, and continue to call for the president's ouster. These groups currently appear unlikely to alter their demands, and Moise will face increasing pressure to step down in 2019 as violence in the country escalates.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.


February 10: Anti-government activists likely to continue nationwide protests in Haiti, Feb. 10. Violence and disruptions likely.

This alert began 10 Feb 2019 09:00 GMT and is scheduled to expire 11 Feb 2019 12:00 GMT.

  • Event: Protests
  • Location: Nationwide
  • Date: Feb. 10
  • Impact: Heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; likely clashes

 

Summary

Anti-government protests are likely to persist nationwide, including Port-au-Prince, in Haiti, Feb. 10, following three days of opposition unrest. Opposition supporters are protesting President Jovenel Moise's administration, and are denouncing poverty, general insecurity, and perceived government corruption. The authorities canceled pre-carnival activities in several areas of the country, including Port-au-Prince, Croix-des-Bouquets, and Petionville, Feb. 9 and 10, due to the unrest.

The security forces will almost certainly deploy to any further protest sites. Clashes between protesters and the police are likely. Several rounds of clashes have already been reported since Feb. 7, leaving at least four people dead and dozens injured. Protesters have blocked major roads and are likely to continue with this tactic. The protest action will continue to disrupt commercial operations and public transportation.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. Do not travel at night. Maintain contact with your diplomatic representation.


February 6: Anti-government activists planning nationwide protests in Haiti, Feb. 7. Violence possible, especially in Port-au-Prince.

This alert began 06 Feb 2019 00:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 07 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Anti-government protests
  • Location: Nationwide, especially Port-au-Prince 
  • Date: Feb. 7
  • Impact: Heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; possible clashes

 

Summary

Various organizations and opposition groups plan to stage protests in Haiti Feb. 7. The action has been called to protest the administration of President Jovenel Moise, and to denounce poverty, general insecurity, and perceived government corruption. The protests will coincide with the 1986 fall of former president Jean-Claude Duvalier. Details on the times and locations of the demonstrations have not been publicized. 

The largest protests are likely to take place in Port-au-Prince. Rallies could occur near the National Palace, Parliament, as well as in Petionville and Delmas. Unannounced protests are possible leading up to Feb. 7. Heightened security measures are standard near government offices and in the vicinity of demonstrations. Police have made frequent use of tear gas to disperse the protests; the use of live ammunition has also become increasingly common during protests, especially in the capital. Localized road travel disruptions near all protests sites are almost certain to occur.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Do not attempt to pass through roadblocks; wait for authorities to remove them. 


February 3: Activists and unions call for nationwide strike in Haiti, Feb. 4. Likely protests and disruptions to business and transport.

This alert began 03 Feb 2019 00:01 GMT and is scheduled to expire 04 Feb 2019 23:59 GMT.

  • Event: Strike
  • Location: Nationwide, especially Port-au-Prince 
  • Date: Feb. 4
  • Impact: Heightened security, commercial and transportation disruptions; likely protests; possible clashes

 

Summary

Leaders of the Brigade Syndicale Anti-Corruption (BSAC) have called for a nationwide strike Feb. 4, to protest fuel price increases. Several unions in the transport sector have indicated their support for the strike. The work stoppage is likely to cause severe disruptions to business operations and transport.

Unannounced protests are highly likely, especially in Port-au-Prince. Potential protest areas include the National Palace, Parliament, as well as in Petionville and Delmas. Heightened security is standard near government offices and near demonstrations. There is an elevated threat of violence at all protests in Haiti; police frequently make use of tear gas to disperse protesters. Localized road travel disruptions near all protest sites are almost certain to occur.

 

Advice

Avoid all protests due to potential violence; shelter in place if unrest occurs nearby. Monitor local media for information regarding protest activity and road closures, especially in Port-au-Prince, as demonstrations may occur with little to no warning. Confirm all business and transport arrangements Feb. 4, and plan for potential road traffic disruptions.
 


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