Summary
Several countries and territories in Sub-Saharan Africa continue to report coronavirus disease (COVID-19) transmission. According to data through Oct. 18 from the WHO, the following countries and territories in Sub-Saharan Africa have identified confirmed COVID-19 cases:

Sporadic cases:

 

  • Djibouti: 5,469 cases
  • Somalia: 3,864 cases
  • Eritrea: 425 cases
  • Mauritius: 407 cases
  • Seychelles: 148 cases

 


Clusters of cases:

 

  • Rwanda: 4,992 cases
  • Mayotte: 4,159 cases
  • Reunion: 4,921 cases
  • Lesotho: 1,833 cases
  • Niger: 1,211 cases
  • Sao Tome and Principe: 933 cases
  • Burundi: 550 cases

 


Community transmission:

 

  • South Africa: 705,254 cases
  • Ethiopia: 89,860 cases
  • Kenya: 45,076 cases
  • Nigeria: 61,558 cases
  • Ghana: 47,372 cases
  • Cameroon: 21,570 cases
  • Cote d'Ivoire: 20,324 cases
  • Madagascar: 16,810 cases
  • Senegal: 15,432 cases
  • Sudan: 13,724 cases
  • Zambia: 15,897 cases
  • The Democratic Republic of the Congo: 11,051 cases
  • Guinea: 11.518 cases
  • Uganda: 10,691 cases
  • Namibia: 12,326 cases
  • Gabon: 8,884 cases
  • Cape Verde: 7,800 cases
  • Zimbabwe: 8,159 cases
  • Mauritania: 7,621 cases
  • Angola: 7,829 cases
  • Malawi: 5,860 cases
  • Eswatini: 5,788 cases
  • Mozambique: 11,080 cases
  • Equatorial Guinea: 5,074 cases
  • Republic of Congo: 5,156 cases
  • Central African Republic: 4,858 cases
  • Botswana: 5,242 cases
  • Gambia: 3,655 cases
  • Mali: 3,407 cases
  • South Sudan: 2,847 cases
  • Guinea-Bissau: 2,403 cases
  • Benin: 2,496 cases
  • Sierra Leone: 2,331 cases
  • Togo: 2,071 cases
  • Burkina Faso: 2,378 cases
  • Liberia: 1,381 cases
  • Chad: 1,390 cases
  • Tanzania: 509 cases
  • Comoros: 502 cases

 

 

Background and Analysis
Coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) is a viral respiratory disease caused by infection with the SARS-CoV-2 virus. Human-to-human transmission does occur, primarily through respiratory droplets from infected individuals or contact with contaminated surfaces or objects. Symptoms occur 1-14 days following exposure (average of 3-7 days). These symptoms typically include fever, fatigue, and dry cough; less common symptoms include headache, diarrhea, loss of taste or smell, reddening of the eyes, skin rash, or discoloration of the fingers or toes. Symptoms may worsen to difficulty breathing, pneumonia, and organ failure - especially in those with underlying, chronic medical conditions. Some infected individuals display no symptoms.

Older individuals and people of any age with chronic medical conditions or compromised immunity should consider postponing nonessential travel, including domestic travel, and take special precautions to avoid becoming ill, especially where sustained community transmission of COVID-19 is ongoing. All individuals should monitor their health and limit interactions with others for 14 days after returning from travel.

Advice
Emphasize basic health precautions, especially frequent handwashing with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable. Practice good coughing/sneezing etiquette (i.e., covering coughs and sneezes with a disposable tissue, maintaining distance from others, and washing hands). There is no evidence that the influenza vaccine, antibiotics, or antiviral medications will prevent this disease, highlighting the importance of diligent basic health precautions.

 

Back to the COVID-19 Risk Intelligence & Resource Center