Severity: Critical Alert

Exit/Entry: European countries maintain movement and business restrictions due to COVID-19 activity as of July 9.

  • Alert Begins: 09 Jul 2020 03:45 PM UTC
  • Alert Expires: 15 Jul 2020 11:59 PM UTC
  • Incident: COVID-19 restrictions
  • Location(s): Europe (map)
  • Time Frame: Indefinite
  • Impact: Significant travel and business disruptions

Summary
Governments in Europe are maintaining travel and other restrictions to prevent the spread of coronavirus disease (COVID-19) as of July 9. Specific measures vary by country, though major restrictions include the following:

 

  • Albania: International flights to and from Albania have resumed and authorities have lifted the daily curfew and movement restrictions. All land borders are open and authorities have lifted the mandatory 14-day quarantine requirement. Some nonessential establishments remain closed.

 

  • Armenia: Authorities have extended the state of emergency until at least July 13. Most foreigners remain barred from entry and arrivals are subject to a 14-day quarantine. Some nonessential businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Face masks are mandatory in public spaces.

 

  • Austria: Most non-EU foreign nationals remain barred from entry. Travelers from countries with high levels of disease activity, including Bulgaria, Portugal, Romania, Sweden, and the UK, must produce a valid health certificate. Nonessential businesses have reopened with social distancing measures. Face coverings are mandatory on public transport and many enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Azerbaijan: Authorities have extended the quarantine regime until at least Aug. 1; a strict lockdown is in effect in Baku, Jalilabad, Ganja, Lankaran, Masalli, Sumgayit, Yevlakh, Absheron, Goranboy, Goygol, Mingachevir, Barda, Khachmaz, Samukh Siyazan, and Sheki until July 20. Certain businesses and public spaces have reopened in some areas. Public gatherings of more than 10 people are prohibited. International travel remains suspended.

 

  • Belgium: Travel with EU countries has resumed. Most nonessential businesses are open. Public transport has resumed, though passengers are required to wear protective masks.

 

  • Bosnia and Herzegovina: Airports and land border crossings with Croatia, Montenegro, and Serbia have reopened; most other foreign nationals remain barred from entry. Some nonessential establishments remain closed.

 

  • Bulgaria: Authorities have extended the epidemic emergency until July 15 in response to increased disease activity. Many nonessential businesses and public spaces have reopened. The ban on intercity travel has been lifted. Protective masks are mandatory on public transport. Most non-EU residents remain prohibited from entering, with some exceptions. Most arrivals must self-isolate for 14 days.

 

  • Croatia: Residents of the EU may now enter the country, and citizens of neighboring countries may enter without having to prove the nature of their visit; visitors from Bosnia-Herzegovina, Kosovo, North Macedonia, and Serbia are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Many nonessential establishments have reopened. Strict social distancing mandates remain in force.

 

  • Cyprus: Airports have reopened and international passenger flights have resumed with some countries; restrictions on entry remain. Authorities have lifted movement restrictions and reopened most businesses and schools.

 

  • Czech Republic: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excepting residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Protective masks are mandatory in enclosed public spaces and on public transport.

 

  • Denmark: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excepting residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Travel restrictions also apply to Portugal and Sweden. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Protective masks are mandatory in enclosed public spaces and on public transport.

 

  • Estonia: Most foreign nationals from outside of the EU, UK, and Schengen Area are barred from entry. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen.

 

  • Finland: Authorities have lifted restrictions for travelers arriving from Norway, Denmark, Iceland, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania; restrictions with other destinations remain in place until July 14. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Gatherings of more than 50 people remain prohibited.

 

  • France: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Public gatherings of over 10 are prohibited and face masks must be worn on public transport and in many enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Georgia: Travelers from France, Germany, Estonia, Latvia, and Lithuania are permitted entry from June 8 via direct flight only; carriers are unlikely to resume services before Aug. 1. Most other foreign nationals remain barred from entry, land borders remain closed. Businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen.

 

  • Germany: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Social distancing measures remain in effect and protective masks must be worn in enclosed public spaces. Localized lockdowns have been introduced in some areas.

 

  • Greece: Travelers arriving from the EU, and limited other destinations are no longer required to self-isolate but may be subject to a health screening. Travelers from other destinations will be tested and isolated on arrival. Many businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Protective face coverings are mandatory on public transport.

 

  • Hungary: Some businesses are permitted to resume operations. Most non-EU foreign nationals, excluding residents of Serbia, are currently prohibited from entry. Protective masks are mandatory in public places.

 

  • Ireland: Residents may travel nationwide without restriction. International arrivals are requested to self-isolate for 14 days. Many businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Gatherings of up to 50 people are permitted indoors and up to 200 people outdoors.

 

  • Italy: Authorities maintain a ban on non-EU foreign nationals entering the country. Most businesses and activities are permitted to resume under certain conditions. Interregional travel is permitted; protective face coverings remain mandatory in enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Latvia: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Most other foreign nationals remain barred from entry. Gatherings of up to 500 people indoors and 1,000 outdoors are permitted. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Protective masks are recommended in enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Lithuania: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Residents returning from countries with elevated disease activity must self-isolate for 14 days. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions.

 

  • Malta: Most citizens of the EEA, Schengen Area, and associated countries are permitted to enter. Bars and restaurants are open, subject to social distancing requirements. Mass gatherings are prohibited. Protective masks are required for public transport.

 

  • Moldova: International passenger flights have resumed. Most foreigners remain barred from entry and most arrivals are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Authorities continue to ease restrictions on businesses under certain conditions.

 

  • Montenegro: International arrivals are permitted from countries of low COVID-19 activity, though individuals are expected to undergo 14-days quarantine. Most businesses have been permitted to resume operations, subject to social distancing requirements. Protective masks are mandatory for public transport.

 

  • Netherlands: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to operate under strict health conditions. Face masks must be worn on public transport and at public transport hubs.

 

  • Northern Cyprus: Ercan International Airport (ECN) resumed limited operations from July 1; travelers from limited countries are permitted entry under strict conditions. Domestic movement restrictions have been lifted and most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen.

 

  • North Macedonia: All land borders have reopened. Nonessential businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Educational and cultural facilities remain closed. Face masks are mandatory in public indoor spaces and recommended in outdoor spaces.

 

  • Norway: Enhanced border controls remain in effect; arrivals from all countries excluding Denmark, Finland, and Iceland are required to self-isolate for 10 days. Most foreign nationals remain barred from entry. Most businesses and facilities have reopened and gatherings of up to 200 people are permitted. Authorities plan to reopen the country for persons residing in countries with a satisfactory infection situation in the EAA and Schengen Area starting July 15.

 

  • Poland: Most non-EU foreign nationals remain barred from entry. Many businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Social distance should be maintained in public. There are no restrictions on religious ceremonies or funerals; however, other cultural events may not exceed 150 persons.

 

  • Portugal: Passenger flights are permitted with all EU, Schengen Area, and associated countries; as well as all Portuguese-speaking countries, the US, Canada, Venezuela, and South Africa. Many businesses are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Protective masks are mandatory for public transport.

 

  • Romania: The state of alert is extended until July 17. International air, road, and rail travel has resumed. Travelers from countries with low COVID-19 infection rates do not need to self-isolate; travelers from other areas must self isolate for 14 days. Many businesses are permitted to reopen subject to social distancing requirements.

 

  • Serbia: Authorities have declared a localized state of emergency and reimposed a number of restrictions in more than 20 urban centers in response to an increase in COVID-19 infection rates. More lenient restrictions remain in effect nationwide. Travelers to Serbia are no longer required to produce a negative COVID-19 test in order to enter the country.

 

  • Slovakia: Authorities are maintaining a list of "safe countries" with which unrestricted travel can resume; travelers from all other areas are required to present a negative COVID-19 test on arrival. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to resume operation under certain conditions. Face masks must be worn in enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Slovenia: Authorities are maintaining a list of "safe countries" with which unrestricted travel can resume; travelers from all other areas are required to present a negative COVID-19 test or self-isolate on arrival. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to resume operation under certain conditions. Face masks must be worn in enclosed public spaces.

 

  • Spain: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. The land border with Portugal was reopened on July 1. Nonessential businesses are permitted to reopen, depending on the region. Localized lockdowns have been introduced in some areas.

 

  • Sweden: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry through at least Aug. 31, excluding residents of limited non-EU countries as recommended by the EU. Shops and other businesses are open, subject to social-distancing requirements. Some educational facilities are currently closed. Public gatherings of more than 50 participants are prohibited.

 

  • Switzerland: Most non-EU and non-EEA residents remain barred from entry until at least July 20. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Face coverings are mandatory on public transport.

 

  • Turkey: Turkish citizens are no longer required to self-isolate on arrival. International flights to limited destinations have resumed. Authorities have lifted restrictions at land borders, excluding at the border with Iran. Many businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen under certain conditions. Protective face coverings are mandatory, and authorities continue to advise against nonessential movement.

 

  • UK: Authorities in England will lift the quarantine requirement for arrivals from more than 50 countries from July 11; devolved governments are responsible for setting their own quarantine requirements. Most businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Local lockdowns have been introduced in some areas.

 

  • Ukraine: International and domestic flights have resumed; arrivals from countries with elevated disease activity are required to self-isolate for 14 days. Many land border crossings remain closed. Certain businesses and facilities are permitted to reopen. Public gatherings are permitted but social distance must be observed. Individuals must wear protective masks and carry an identity document when in public.

 


The EU opened most internal borders June 15; permanent residents and citizens of the EU, the UK, or the Schengen Area may travel freely within the bloc. Additionally, EU authorities have recommended travel resume with 15 non-EU countries deemed epidemiologically safe, effective July 1; national governments may choose not to follow these recommendations.

Freight transport is generally unaffected by border closures, though localized movement restrictions are possible at short notice. Many governments have also imposed quarantine requirements for travelers arriving from areas of high COVID-19 activity. Public transport operators and airlines will likely operate significantly reduced services. Many governments and airlines have suspended or curtailed flight operations; further service reductions, as well as airport closures, could be announced at short notice.

School closures will probably result in increased absenteeism among employees who are parents or guardians of school-aged children. In addition, large numbers of workers will continue to work from home in the coming weeks as a routine health precaution and due to voluntary self-isolation.

Governments could expand their responses in the coming weeks, particularly if COVID-19 activity increases in-country. Immigration delays are possible, especially for passengers from countries with significant numbers of COVID-19 cases. Some countries are likely to incrementally relax restrictions in the coming weeks if they judge the pandemic threat to be under control. As countries ease blanket restrictions, authorities could begin to reintroduce sporadic, highly targeted measures in response to local COVID-19 outbreaks. Such measures could apply to neighborhoods or specific facilities, including schools, factories, or accommodation and office blocks. Mandatory social distancing procedures in public places and on public transport, as well as widespread voluntary “self-policing” by the population, will assist in reducing the potential for contagion, negating the necessity for a nationwide reintroduction of significant restrictions.

Advice
Confirm travel arrangements before setting out. Follow all official immigration and health screening instructions. Allow additional time for immigration and health screenings at all ports of entry. Consider delaying traveling if experiencing symptoms associated with COVID-19, as they may prompt increased scrutiny and delays. Consider and test contingency plans to allow remote working where possible.

Exercise basic health precautions, especially frequent handwashing with soap and water, or an alcohol-based hand sanitizer if soap and water are unavailable. There is no evidence that the influenza vaccine, antibiotics, or antiviral medications will prevent this disease, highlighting the importance of diligent basic health precautions.


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